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Moon Illusion: Full Moon rose behind Mount Hamilton, east of San Jose, California

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posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by krazyiven
reply to post by ThichHeaded
 


are you serious??? is that really possible or are you joking??


No I am actually quite serious.. Try it sometime and report back with the results..




posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Hey ELE Snf for a comprehensive look at this phenomena. Thanks for the trouble in bringing understanding to ATS.


54 flags in two pages says quite a lot. SnF
edit on 10-3-2012 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by ThichHeaded

Originally posted by krazyiven
reply to post by ThichHeaded
 


are you serious??? is that really possible or are you joking??


No I am actually quite serious.. Try it sometime and report back with the results..

Yes, he's right!!

And this account for discard (or at least take in a partial way) some of the actual explanations, especially the contextual effects:


When we judge the size of an object near the horizon our perception is influenced by familiar terrestrial objects in the field of view (trees, houses, roads). We know from everyday experience that many of the recognizable things we see in the distance are quite far away. But when our gaze is upwards, we have no reference cues for distance, and judge things near the zenith to be closer than those on the horizon. Ibn Alhazan proposed this explanation for the moon illusion around 1000 CE.

Some experiments seem to support this explanation.

1- After-images of bright objects may be produced on the retina. Their apparent size depends upon where you look, being smaller when you look at a blank wall, or up into the sky, but larger when there are comparison objects in your visual field.

2- When one looks at the moon near the horizon through a hole in a piece of paper held some distance in front of the eye the moon appears smaller. The "horizon effect" largely disappears. One interpretation of this experiment is that the paper tube obscures any familiar reference objects. It seems to show that the moon illusion is due to direct comparison with reference objects of known size. Another interpretation is that the paper tube provides a visually dominating reference object already judged to be "near".


However!!


Some experiments cast doubt that these explanations are complete.

1- The moon illusion persists even when viewed on a dark night on a featureless plain, on the ocean, and even by airline pilots flying high above clouds. So reference objects of known size aren't the only basis for the illusion.

2- The moon illusion disappears (for most people) when they bend down and look at the moon between their legs. Or, if so inclined, one can view the moon by hanging from one's heels! At least two hypotheses have been proposed to account for this. (1) Familiar objects in the field of view may become useless as distance references because of their unfamiliar appearance when viewed upside-down. (2) The illusion may have something to do with our inner-ear's balance mechanism that tells us whether the head is upright or upside-down.

3- The method of viewing the moon through a hole in a piece of paper may also be used to view other objects. They too, appear smaller when viewed through the hole. Is our brain using the paper and the hole as a strongly dominant reference object? The nearby reference object is the paper; distant reference objects are hidden.


Source
edit on 10-3-2012 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)
edit on 10-3-2012 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 06:35 PM
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At zenith, the Moon has no 'cue point' / comparison point other than minuscule stars. Closer to the horizon it often has; like buildings, trees etc.

Thus the illusion of a bigger Moon when closer to the horizon (relative to objects in the Moon's vicinity) is created.

/not-so-mysterious non mystery



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 06:56 PM
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The Moon is VERY low in the night sky here in Edinburgh tonight.
Last night it was very high.

What would cause this?



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Regardless of the science behind it... that is just beautiful!



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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Wow very interesting =).



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by shauny
 


It's called precession and the moon didn't go higher, you went lower. The Earth spins like an uneven spinning top.

Precession



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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Absolutely beautiful!
2



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 11:25 PM
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You make very nice and informative threads here elevenaugust, and I want to extend my appreciation that you do so, quite well. Some things I haven't really thought much about, some things I didn't know about, and usually just a very nice addition to some real live earthly wonders, for a space exploration forum, anywhere.



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 11:36 PM
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Great thread, OP.

Any thoughts on the boat moon being seen from the Northern Hemisphere?



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 12:44 AM
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reply to post by ColAngus
 


Our axial tilt in the winter time puts about the 23'rd parallel to where one would think the equator would be in respect to the ecliptic of the lunar orbit which is very close to the solar ecliptic.

It sets as a 'boat' but rises as a parachute, and the world turns.



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 01:20 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Not fully accurate, I concede it, but nonetheless beautiful, don't you think so?

Absolutely. Especially since I live directly between the Lick and where you took this shot from.

Domes on the Hill.


Edit: Further conjunctions of Moon, Venus and Jupiter to the west in late March (25, 27). Got Plans? Seems you have a good wide angle on your camera or telescope... maybe?

Conjunction
edit on 11-3-2012 by intrptr because: additional...



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 03:46 AM
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Tonight, Saturn and Spica provide mouse ears for the moon.
Cool , as they are above the moon and equidistant in appearance, like Mickey Mouse.



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 07:04 AM
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looks like some #ty photoshop work to me.
reply to post by elevenaugust
 



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 07:56 AM
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An intriguing illusion - cheers for taking the time to create a thread about it here on ATS.
An object of majesty whichever size it looks. S+F






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