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SLEEPING Bag Selection - Tips Experience & Recommendations, Anybody?

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posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 01:51 PM
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Getting ready for road trips this spring and dont want to freeze to death at the truck stop or in crappy motels with broken heat.

Or for when TPTBSHTF although I don't plan on being in North America by 2015 anyways.

But in the mean time or plan B, what are the best sleeping bag for temperate? for a bit colder than temperate?

Ideally i want an economical, sleep, easy to clean (polyester) that I can also sleep in/on at home since I am minimalist ( i just threw my coleman out because it got linty (flannel cotton poly mix?) and i have never owned a proper bed)

Thanks in advance!




posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 02:24 PM
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There's a military 3 in 1 sleeping bag system that comes to mind that may fit what you are looking for. You can go to my website to see it at survivalgearup.org. Just type it in the search box and you will see it. I know this is silly but my copy & paste functions aren't working right now so I can't leave you the link...sorry.



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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Not dirt cheap...but Its my opinion that you cant beat a government issued (army surplus or military uniform shop if you have friend or family active duty, gun and knife shows ) unless you get into the high end stuff like Western mountaineering.



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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I've had good four-season success with a sub-zero mummy bag and a fleece liner. Less than $100 for both.

One piece of advice is if elevated up in a harness, tree or hammock the air passing under you will start to freeze your ass despite the sub-zero bag and liner. A foam pad, bunch of clothes packed in or even one of those aluminum looking space blankets will do wonders in such a case.



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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Ex-military surplus sleeping bags are really good + a foil space blanket/foam rubber mat + fleece liner + hammock is worthwhile to get you off the ground (if required). As a general rule keep your head warm and the rest of you will stay warm too.
edit on 9/3/12 by Anon77 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 04:10 PM
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From a backpacking perspective... down bag with a bivy. The 0 degree down bag is approx. 5 pounds (give or take) so very easy to pack around and warm when it needs to be. The bivy is approx. 2 pounds and great for protection from the elements, presuming you don't have or want to pack a tent.

Just something different to consider from that which has already been presented. Best advice: try the different options out for yourself before you need to rely on it. You will figure out what you like best.
edit on 9-3-2012 by LadySkadi because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 07:29 PM
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Sleeping bags are rated for temperature.

But keep in mind that the temperature rating means it will keep you alive at that temperature, not necessarily comfortable.

When sleeping in very cold conditions we used to put the winter bag, inside the summer bag.

Another good thing to know is in cold conditions avoid cotton and change clothes right before bed to keep dry. Moisture in your clothes from wearing them all day is what makes you feel cold.

Wear a knit hat to bed for extra warmth. Most heat escapes off the head.
edit on 9-3-2012 by kawika because: corectolated spel'n err



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by wrecksrme
There's a military 3 in 1 sleeping bag system that comes to mind that may fit what you are looking for. You can go to my website to see it at survivalgearup.org. Just type it in the search box and you will see it. I know this is silly but my copy & paste functions aren't working right now so I can't leave you the link...sorry.


Cant go wrong with that one. I have the black mummy bag out of that system. over the Christmas Holidays I went up to Williston N.D. looking for work. Astro Van slept like a baby with a blanket over the mummy bag.12 degrees Slept like a baby,

big diff between 12deg and a hotel though. 3 pc. sleep system is the cats Pajama's (npi)
edit on 9-3-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 08:45 PM
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ground sheet, sleepin bag, and nice liner
AVOID condensation when its cold - that indoor rain is the worst thing, and damp ground too
so make sure you have good ventilation
stay dry

down bags are nice and they roll up small
over do it, you can always unzip a little
edit on 9-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 08:50 PM
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This last fall we spent a week in the Rocky Mountain National Park at temperatures around or just below freezing at night. I had a 0 degree down sleeping bag and it got warm enough that I had to take my hat off at night. Probably should have went with a 20 degree bag. Don't try to find the warmest bag possible. Get one that is appropriate for the temperature outside.

One word of advice. Don't leave any empty space in your bag because that space will get cold. If you have a 7 foot bag stuff a jacket or blanket at the end or your feet will get chilly.


edit on 3/9/2012 by dbates because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 08:54 PM
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reply to post by dbates
 


dunno
you might guess the temp ahead of time sometimes
most times
trust me
prepare for the worst it might get
because it will



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 09:01 PM
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You could just snuggle up to one of these bonfires. This was taken yesterday in Northern Colorado. Forest service was burning off dead timber. Nothing like a roaring fire on top of several feet of snow.



Photo source: Rocky Mountain National Park - Facebook page
edit on 3/9/2012 by dbates because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 09:09 PM
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Originally posted by dbates
You could just snuggle up to one of these bonfires. This was taken yesterday in Northern Colorado. Forest service was burning off dead timber. Nothing like a roaring fire on top of several feet of snow.



its a tough job
but somebody has to do it right?



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 01:55 AM
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You could try making your own bedroll.. gather a few blankets (thin but tough, warm but light..moving blankets work well) , a foam mat and a tarp and roll them all together (tarp on the outside of course) use some strapping to hold them. you can also roll up other things inside the bedroll like clothes, an axe or a rifle, and turn it into a survival kit. Backwoodsman used to venture into the wilderness with nothing but a bedroll and an axe long before fancy sleeping bags..
edit on 3/10/2012 by DanHogan because: grammar



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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I have to agree with those that suggested the 3 in 1 military issue. I just recently got one before winter and I have to say it is the best bang for your buck. I got mine at an army surplus store and I have to admit it is the best sleeping bag I have owned.



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 11:10 AM
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I'll give an easy nod to down with a good shell fabric. Its money well spent on a good sleeping bag. Down, is light and highly compressible.

I had synthetic (polarguard) bag many moons ago and ditched it after it lost its loft. Synthetics keep evolving but are still tough to match up to down.



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by BiggerPicture
 


These are pretty awesome IMO-You can walk about in it without getting chilly.
I think the Ruskies invented this type,but here is a Japanese version:



The legs can be zipped together into a conventional "bag" as well.



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 05:28 PM
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I know this is not what the OP is looking for but I'll share this here because how often does a sleeping bag thread come up on ATS.

If you deal with ridiculously harsh environments like I do there is ultimately one sleeping bag that you want in with your emergency gear.
The XPD Sierra
It is truly a thing to behold.


edit on 10-3-2012 by dainoyfb because: I typo'd



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


and on warm nights it makes a nice mattress
lol
(just not so good when wet though)
here's to the invention of fire


edit on 10-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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I will agree that the Army issue bags are great, but two things must be considered. One, it is extremely heavy and doesn't compress as much as backpacking/mountaineering bags do, and two, once wet they take forever to dry out. If you are stationary with dry shelter, Army issue is a great choice, but not if you are gonna have to be mobile, chose a backpacking bag. Any of the Marmot, North Face, or Big Agnes bags are great. The REI store brand makes a bag called a Polar Pod that wont kill your wallet like the name brands. Plus with these brands, if it is rated to 0 degrees its good to 0 degrees, as peoples lives depend on this gear. The same can't be said for the bag bought at Walmart. Also, a good bag liner will add about 10 to 15 degrees of warmth and adds little to no weight or bulk.



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