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Can a anti static bag save electronics from solar burst?

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posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:38 PM
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We recently had a solar burst and it has me thinking. So do you think anti static bags would save electronics if their was a large burst that knocked out our electronics?




posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 

I have been in the field of electronics for over 20 years.

give me anyone who can predict the effects of a solar flare 100% and I will answer your question.

IMO. It would help, but there is no guarantee

PS
If you're thinking about a cell phone or other network device I would suggest that without a cell network, the cell device is kind of not very useful





edit on 8-3-2012 by Glargod because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:51 PM
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Need protection from radiation? Lead shielding is an option, but it's probably cheaper to just buy new electronics.



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:52 PM
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Is a cell phone loosing the signal while inside an anti-static bag? no !
You need to rather use a Faraday cage, and the most handy I can think about , is a microwave oven. It is designed to protect you while the chicken is being cooked inside by the microwaves
, it also woks the other way around, protecting your items inside the microwave oven while you are cooked outside

edit on 8-3-2012 by Romanian because: wrong spelling : OVEN



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:52 PM
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i think it would help to an extent. as long as it was sealed, but im sure there is a threshold to it.



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:54 PM
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Am i wrong if i say that it only affects overhanging electrical wires, and not directly electronics like dvd, radio's and such?



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:55 PM
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whats it worth saving your electronics when the power grid is wiped out????



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:55 PM
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A faraday cage would work better
Faraday cage


Faraday cages cannot block static and slowly varying magnetic fields, such as Earth's magnetic field (a compass will still work inside). To a large degree though, they also shield the interior from external electromagnetic radiation if the conductor is thick enough and any holes are significantly smaller than the radiation's wavelength. For example, certain computer forensic test procedures of electronic components or systems that require an environment devoid of electromagnetic interference may be conducted within a screen room. These screen rooms are essentially work areas that are completely enclosed by one or more layers of fine metal mesh or perforated sheet metal. The metal layers are grounded to dissipate any electric currents generated from the external electromagnetic fields and thus block a large amount of the electromagnetic interference. See also electromagnetic shielding.


, maybe a bit better than a static bag. But some protection is better than none



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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i know copper mesh and carbon fiber absorb a whole lot of ( RF )



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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I think it would work if you earthed the bag....maybe

Normaly an earthed container will work, thats why your radio wont work in the freezer.



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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I have a very limited knowledge about electronics. My thinking is, I doubt it would help very much, but it can't hurt either...

This particular solar flare is not strong enough to do any real damage. If you're on a cellphone,your call may drop today. That's about the worst you are going to see, I suspect.

Now, let's say one comes along that is as strong as one you are thinking about...What good is it going to do saving your electronics, if the power grid is gone?



edit on 8-3-2012 by gimme_some_truth because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by camaro68ss
whats it worth saving your electronics when the power grid is wiped out????


There's your answer fishbulb.

If all electronic were wiped out you may be able to save your laptop battery long enough to watch one more movie or listen to a couple of hours of music. But make it a good choice.



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by Romanian
 





Is a cell phone loosing the signal while inside an anti-static bag? no ! You need to rather use a Faraday cage, and the most handy I can think about , is a microwave oven. It is designed to protect you while the chicken is being cooked inside by the microwaves , it also woks the other way around, protecting your items inside the microwave oven while you are cooked outside


seriously? Cause I was wondering about that, but I thought it might be stupid.



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by omegacorps
 


true about the copper mash, we also use it for composite structures on aeroplanes, same reason. I believe the lowest cost solution is the microwave oven, everyone has one or can find a broken one (if the electronics are broken but the oven looks all right inside) . It is very well designed and shielded for a typical Carrington event .. good for storing harrddrives and memory cards etc.
edit on 8-3-2012 by Romanian because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by Mianeye
Am i wrong if i say that it only affects overhanging electrical wires, and not directly electronics like dvd, radio's and such?

No. You are not wrong.

The radiation of a solar flare is absorbed by the atmosphere before it can have any effect on the surface. The charged particles which are produced are captured by the magnetosphere. Geomagnetic storms can affect long electrical conductors like power lines but have no harmful effects on electronic devices.



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


eh, it depends. Microprocessors do have wires (golden ones!
) , on a micro local level it can act like a generator, enough to create added electrostatic load within the processor and knock it down.. micro-waving and RFID is a good example (exaggerated hehe)




posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by Romanian
 

Geomagnetic storms produce currents through induction. It would have to be a pretty high frequency field to affect something a small as the circuits in an electronic device.

The effects of microwaves are a bit different but of course, microwaves of much higher frequencies than the ripples in Earth's magnetic field.



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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Originally posted by Romanian
reply to post by Phage
 


eh, it depends. Microprocessors do have wires (golden ones!
) , on a micro local level it can act like a generator, enough to create added electrostatic load within the processor and knock it down.. micro-waving and RFID is a good example (exaggerated hehe)



do the sums and see how much voltage will be induced by the short wires on a chip by a solar storm. In space it is a different matter, as there is no moisture around to discharge the static buildup. If you have a really strong X5, hitting the earth directly, it will induce less than 2V in a 10m dipole, and your receiver will have back-to-back diodes in any case to protect it from static discharges. The wires on your chips are a couple of millimeters long, so I'll leave you to the maths (in any case, the length of wire will make it an efficient antenna only at a very high frequency). You also need to take into consideration how the components work. Normally nowadays, you have clamping diodes on all the inputs too (it is just the way nature of the CMOS inputs).

and if you are really paranoid, just wrap the stuff in tin-foil, making sure no power leads come out to the mains, and try to ground the tinfoil with an efficient ground (not via your mains ground lead). If you are really, really, really paranoid, put the tinfoil-screened device in a metal box without a hinge, and put some mesh (or copper braid where the cover goes onto the tin), and make sure that the tin is grounded too. That configuration should give you more than 70dB of shielding. If you are really, really, really paranoid, you can solder the lid to the tin lol .....
edit on 8/3/2012 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


Thank you for your reply, always happy to learn some things here! I did not consider that X5 flare would impact processors, this is why I was referring to a Carrington event (en.wikipedia.org...):




On September 1–2, 1859, the largest recorded geomagnetic storm occurred. Aurorae were seen around the world, most notably over the Caribbean; also noteworthy were those over the Rocky Mountains that were so bright that their glow awoke gold miners, who began preparing breakfast because they thought it was morning.[3] People who happened to be awake in the northeastern US could read a newspaper by the aurora's light.


Some people mentioned it was an X45 flare, and the scale as far as I know is not a linear one. Quite curious if we could estimate risk for processors / microchips in this situation.



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
If you are really, really, really paranoid, you can solder the lid to the tin lol .....


LOL no, I'm too lazy . Will get a damaged microwave oven haha.




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