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Secrets Revealed !

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posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by Iamschist
reply to post by II HAL II
 


Is it the Temple Church?




Thats a nice find and I admit I never knew about this place, it does at least put the Templars in the area.

It doesn't feature in this however.... as far as I know anyway.




posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 04:44 PM
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I just took a quick look, Hal.

Could it be the Sheldonian Theatre?



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 04:46 PM
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reply to post by II HAL II
 


Greenwich Hospital?



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by Doodle19815

Originally posted by II HAL II

1. Knights Templar Secret
2. Masonic link?
3. RBS link?
4. Strange statue alignments
5. An area of London the Queen herself has to get permission to enter.
6. Dragons guarding the City treasure

Also, the document Jrmcleod posted is very interesting, thanks.

Think how items 1 & 3 are linked, how 5 & 6 are linked, and to a lesser extent how 2 & 4 are linked.





Originally posted by II HAL II
reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


*snip*

Think about my previous post, the builder of the church (C Wren) and connection to what we have already looked at, is there one?

*snip*




For those just joining, a quick sum-up of how we got where we are.
edit on 9-3-2012 by Doodle19815 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:05 PM
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RBS and Christopher Wren search results returned this.



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by II HAL II
 


en.wikipedia.org...:Christopher_Wren_London_buildings
Is it the Royal Observatory?

The Royal Observatory, Greenwich (formerly the Royal Greenwich Observatory or RGO), in London, England played a major role in the history of astronomy and navigation, and is best known as the location of the prime meridian. It is situated on a hill in Greenwich Park, overlooking the River Thames. The observatory was commissioned in 1675 by King Charles II, with the foundation stone being laid on 10 August.[1] At this time the king also created the position of Astronomer Royal (initially filled by John Flamsteed), to serve as the director of the observatory and to "apply himself with the most exact care and diligence to the rectifying of the tables of the motions of the heavens, and the places of the fixed stars, so as to find out the so much desired longitude of places for the perfecting of the art of navigation." The building was completed in the summer of 1676.[2] The building was often given the title "Flamsteed House". The scientific work of the observatory was relocated elsewhere in stages in the first half of the 20th century, and the Greenwich site is now maintained as a tourist attraction.



The establishment of a Royal Observatory was proposed in 1674 by Sir Jonas Moore who, in his role as Surveyor General at the Ordnance Office, persuaded King Charles II that the Observatory might be built with Flamsteed employed in it.[5] The Ordnance Office was given responsibility for building the Observatory, with Moore providing the key instruments and equipment for the observatory at his own personal cost. Flamsteed House, the original part of the Observatory, was designed by Sir Christopher Wren probably with the assistance of Robert Hooke and was the first purpose-built scientific research facility in Britain. It was built for a cost of £520 (£20 over budget) out of largely recycled materials on the foundations of Duke Humphrey's Tower, which resulted in the alignment being 13 degrees away from true North, somewhat to Flamsteed's chagrin.












en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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We are now at St Pauls (another C Wren building as pointed out before by another poster), where the Temple Bar has been relocated. Along the way finding a little more info on the Knights Templar and other areas of interest........ lets leave this here for the moment. And....



Now to a nearby station with a deadly sounding name,
Sits an object that should really have more fame,
Opposite the station and up along the street,
There is a window being ignored by peoples feet.



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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"The treasure of the Templars is not in doubt, it existed as a result of creating a Check writing system and the commissions received, enough to build a fleet of ships and maintain dozens of castles and constructions. The Check writing system was actually the first Central bank in Europe."

"The bank of England was created by William Patterson, a Scotsman, but is generally accepted as a front for private concerns. William went on to become the sheriff of "the City of London", not to be confused with London itself. The city of London is a private corporation, exists on 677 square acres and is subject to its own laws and rule. As it has for several hundred years, the City of London directs British economic policies to this day."

"To summarize, the Templar treasure was never lost, it is hidden in plain view used to replicate the same banking system that proved successful for the original Knights Templar; It is the Royal bank of Scotland, the Bank of England, Rothschild banking, UBS bank, and all of their cross connected and interbred offspring. This is one very possible location of the Templar treasure, the modern Banking system."


also:
"Child & Co. is a private banking house in the United Kingdom, part of the Royal Bank of Scotland Group.Child & Co. is one of the oldest financial institutions in the UK, and can trace its roots back to a London goldsmith business in the late 17th century"

"In fact, Child & Co also had a second symbol to help pinpoint its location. Its premises were adjacent to the famous London landmark Temple Bar, one of the ancient gateways to the City of London, rebuilt in 1672, probably to designs by Christopher Wren"

so a few ties, i'm not actually sure what it is we are supposed to be looking for,



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by II HAL II
 


'A nearby Station'

Would this be a train station? subway station?



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by II HAL II
 


St Swithin, London Stone was an Anglican Church situated in Cannon Street, City of London. The church gave its name to St Swithin's Lane which runs north from Cannon Street to King William Street.

The church was rebuilt by Sir John Hind in 1405.[2] One of the 86 churches destroyed in the Great Fire of London, it was rebuilt to a design by Sir Christopher Wren in 1678[3] at a cost of £4,687 4s 6d.[4]

??

i am assuming we are talking about Cannon Street station (as in cannon is deadly)
edit on 9-3-2012 by Equ1nox because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:36 PM
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My geography sucks though I am usually pretty decent in picking up patterns, likeness, and esoteric ideas.

King's Cross Station?

Also, it's it the Year of the Dragon?



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by II HAL II
 


All you do here is come across as a massive tool!!.

Whoever "sent" you that amateur childish code is a moron!!

Will all children please leave this board and go suckle on the teet of stupidity!!

DUMBEST post I have ever read on this semi-comedic forum!!



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by HowardCrane
 


If it isn't it should be.


The Stone was originally situated in the middle of Cannon Street and was much larger than it is now. It is shown on the 1550s copperplate map of London, as a large block of stone in Candlewick Street (now Cannon Street) outside St Swithin's Church. The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and rebuilt by Christopher Wren, who encased the old stone in a larger protective carved stone. By 1742, the stone had become an obstruction to traffic, and was moved from the south side of Cannon Street to the north side. For similar reasons, it was moved again in 1798, and by 1828 was set into the south wall of St Swithin's Church, on the north side of Cannon Street. The church was bombed during the Second World War, but the Stone was left unscathed. The stone was moved and put on display opposite Cannon Street station in 1962, although rather inconspicuously situated. The stone and box, with iron grille, were designated a Grade II* listed structure on 5 June 1972.[5] A decorative grille to protect the stone had been provided by the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society in 1869; it is clear from old photographs that the present grille is not the original, but a version made in similar style in 1962. There are current proposals to move the stone further down Cannon Street to allow the building into which it is built to be redeveloped. Like the Ravens of the Tower of London, there is a myth that states the Stone's safety is linked to that of the city itself; "So long as the stone of Brutus is safe, so long shall London flourish". This relates to the myth that the stone was part of an altar built by Brutus of Troy, the legendary founder of London. The nearest London Underground and National Rail station is Cannon Street — the station's main entrance is opposite the Stone on Cannon Street. There is also a pub nearby called "The London Stone".


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 06:01 PM
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Originally posted by Six6Six
reply to post by II HAL II
 


All you do here is come across as a massive tool!!.

Whoever "sent" you that amateur childish code is a moron!!

Will all children please leave this board and go suckle on the teet of stupidity!!

DUMBEST post I have ever read on this semi-comedic forum!!


You do not have to be here!



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 06:06 PM
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I am sure that you knew of the Temple Church
as I am sure that you knew of the Temple Tube line, well perhaps you will show some Hospitlier to the people with less inside knowledge of the structure of London's rebuilding after the dreadfull " accidental " fire of 66. Perhaps some people knew in advance of that date that they would need new churches and significant buildings, before the event, perhaps that is how they were able to submit completed plans for perusal, within a day or so of the event. The fire " started " in Pudding lane, but somehow it had many flashpoints which were mysteriously far from each other. The monument is a significant monument to fire, or sun-dial, as I am sure some others are. I just wonder if there are any significant lay lines in 3 area ? Most of the area was Levelled, but fortunatly Temple Church was spared. Oh what a tangled web !



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by II HAL II
 


Having poured over the London Tube map, I feel I could find my way around London, no problem. I also now have a list of places to go.

Howard, The London Stone pub is nearby, want another pint? I'll buy.



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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It comes in PINTS?



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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Originally posted by II HAL II

Originally posted by Iamschist
reply to post by II HAL II
 


Is it the Temple Church?




Thats a nice find and I admit I never knew about this place, it does at least put the Templars in the area.

It doesn't feature in this however.... as far as I know anyway.


A play on words perhaps


Ground Zero is a neat place to start !

Exlpore on foot, but don't photograph, you may get into trouble with Whitehall !
edit on 9-3-2012 by Qwenn because: spelling



posted on Mar, 9 2012 @ 06:18 PM
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reply to post by Iamschist
 


Absolutely, I could never turn down a free pint!

What I did a few hours ago was start up by the monument in street view. And I walked all the way along our route all the way back to Temple Bar. I noticed so many interesting things. I suggest others try it.

Wren built nearly every old building along this route btw. 86 churches burned down here during the fire and he put 51 back up. And as for Wren's churches that didn't survive, equally interesting new buildings have popped up where they were. I've learned a #load about London today.



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