i was asked to join the freemasons

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posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 01:27 AM
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reply to post by JoshNorton
 

im not here for grammar lessons im here for answers to my questions if you dont wanna help answer those questions then go elsewhere like said i only want some answers not people judging me on my grammar or calling me a liar so can please get past all the nonsense
edit on 7-3-2012 by gdmfs2200 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 01:32 AM
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Originally posted by gdmfs2200
reply to post by JoshNorton
 

im not here for grammar lessons im here for answers to my questions if you dont wanna help answer those questions then go elsewhere like said i only want some answers not people judging me on my grammar or calling me a liar so can please get past all the nonsense
edit on 7-3-2012 by gdmfs2200 because: (no reason given)





From the Fellowcraft degree ritual:


He is not so much "judging you on your grammar" as he is, informing you that Mason's have a higher standard among their ranks. Don't take it personally.




posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 01:39 AM
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I think you should just ask your Grandfather any questions you have about freemasonry.

I contacted the Freemasons of my own free will and 2 of them came to my house and I got to ask them as many questions as I liked.

I've met some of the nicest, humblest and good people ever since joining.

And yes, I've even asked our grand master about many conspiracies including the Da Vinci Code, which he even said himself that there is some truth in! ( and no he didn't turn into am huge lizard and gobble me up!)



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 01:48 AM
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reply to post by JoshNorton
 


I believe that this sounds right up my alley.

I just have mixed opinions on the Freemasons.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 01:52 AM
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reply to post by grantbeed
 
well i will talk to him once i see him again but untill then im going continue looking for answers on here



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 02:36 AM
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Have you been to support any of the masonic fund raisers for your community? You should ask your grandfather when their next fund raiser is and go with him, ask him questions, and help your community. maybe meet some people your age and ask them questions also. I don't think asking people on a conspiracy website about your grandfathers and local community's fraternal organisation is fair to the local lodge or your grandfather, If you are really interested do it the right way and go to the local lodge and ask all your questions first. You should take this as a serious life decision, it does take a good bit of dedication. The more you put into it the more you will get out of it.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 02:46 AM
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i have enough hearing about these pretend masons these days..... they need to change their name



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 05:10 AM
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reply to post by The Sword
 


Exactly my thought when I read that. I know there's a lodge very close to me, but I honestly don't really know much about the masons. It would be an interesting prospect to look into.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 05:43 AM
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Originally posted by metodex
you are never asked to join.They do not invite people in.It goes against some of the Freemasonry rules.You lie,go make a youtube video if you want attention


While it's not supposed to happen, it does. And usually by fathers or grandfathers.
I had a similar experience and gave the same answer. But a seed was planted and I kept getting more curious until I finally joined to find the rest of the answers. On my own.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by network dude
 


thank you so could you tell me is it worth joining what kinds of things do you do at lodge meetings and how often do you have to go to the meetings



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 07:07 AM
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Originally posted by Swills
I do believe the Mason's say they never ask anyone to join their club but if people actually believed that they're probably gullible. Do you think that Mason's don't ask their son's to join?


I never said that they did not. The point I was trying to make is one should nto join because someone asked them. They should join because they wanted to.


His uncle is a high level Mason...


Everyone sounds like they know something until they throw out the 'high level' nonesense. What is a 'high level' Mason?



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by metodex
you are never asked to join.They do not invite people in.It goes against some of the Freemasonry rules.You lie,go make a youtube video if you want attention


He isn't necessarily lying. I must admit, I have been guilty of planting a suggestion in people. I don't exactly invite them, but I have said things like, "You would make a good Mason," or "Why aren't you a Mason yet." Then, when they say they didn't know how to join, and they start asking questions, I am able to answer their questions.

And, there are some states that actively recruit. Most Masons don't like the idea of recruiting, but I have seen giant billboards with Masonic Emblems, the phone number to their Grand Lodge and the logo 2 B 1 ASK 1.

So, the OP isn't necessarily lying, it would not be unheard of for a Grandfather to suggest to his Grandson that he might want to ask about Masonry.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 07:48 AM
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reply to post by metodex
 


The masons will ask people to join and will invite family members to meals and events in the hope that one day they will continue in the craft.

I think with the OPs grandad, he wanted to share the social group of friends that he has presumably been enjoying for many a year - surely that is quite natural.

I used to be a freemason but left as it was quite annioying and not the eye opener that one might have expected. We were specifically told that we can recommend people to join - the reason being that the number of applications is down, the membership base is pretty old and they need young, lively people who are interested in joinnig the 'club'.

I am sure there are more sinister purposes for some masons but these are most probably a by product of meeting regularly with a group of men from different businesses - one of our local lodges was for much more high powered, bankery types! It goes to reason that they will discuss their business affairs (although this against the rules).

All the people I met were genuinely very nice guys who enjoyed the social aspect and the fact thaty they felt it was giving something back with the charity.

FYI my lodge was part of the York rite under control of the grand lodge in the UK (at Holborn, London), not the Scottish rite which appears to be much more common in the US.
edit on 7-3-2012 by SunWuKong because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 08:01 AM
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reply to post by SunWuKong
 


how many rites are there and whats the difference between them



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 08:34 AM
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Originally posted by gdmfs2200
reply to post by network dude
 


thank you so could you tell me is it worth joining what kinds of things do you do at lodge meetings and how often do you have to go to the meetings


Yes sir, it's worth joining. Once you become a "high level" Mason, you are taught to fly! Cool huh?

Having just finished my journey through the York Rite, I'm sad to say that I'm not a "high level" Mason, as I can't fly yet. Maybe it happens in the Scottish Rite?

In meetings, we mostly exchange kitten recipes.


Most lodges have a meeting once a month. The lodge I belong to has something going on every week. Also, you don't "have" to go to meetings, it's up to you on how involved you want to be.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 08:56 AM
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Originally posted by gdmfs2200


how many rites are there and whats the difference between them


In the United States, there are two rites that are worked: Scottish and York. You will become a Master Mason in a symbolic (blue) lodge of the York Rite. In the USA and Canada, the Scottish Rite recognizes the first three degrees of the York Rite, and so the Scottish begins its own system with the 4th degree.

On a side note, there are several reasons that Masons are not supposed to ask their friends to join. First, it is necessary that one comes of his own free will and accord. If he does it half-heartedly or with lukewarmness, it is unlikely that he will possess the necessary zeal to complete the curriculum and become active in the fraternity.

Secondly, all applicants are required to pass a unanimous ballot in most jurisdictions. So just because a Mason invites one of his friends to join doesn't necessarily mean that he will be admitted.

In my jurisdiction, solicitation for membership is a Masonic offense, and any Mason found guilty of it is subject to Masonic discipline.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 09:02 AM
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Originally posted by gdmfs2200
reply to post by JoshNorton
 

im not here for grammar lessons im here for answers to my questions if you dont wanna help answer those questions then go elsewhere like said i only want some answers not people judging me on my grammar or calling me a liar so can please get past all the nonsense
I'm just answering your question. We have a rule—part of the Master Mason's obligation, actually—not to admit fools. I don't know you beyond this forum, but in this forum you present yourself as an illiterate oaf. If your real-world self image is as base as your online persona, they will not vote you in. Freemasons expect men to hold themselves to a higher standard. If you want people to take you seriously, you have to be able to communicate with them like a serious adult. If you can't do that, you'll never get past the first interview, much less the balloting process.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 09:04 AM
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I was also asked to join, was given a plastic card with info on the masons, they were nice to ask, but I said no because it is a time commitment I am unwilling to make. Basically from what I've read, it is disrespectful to join if you don't intend on regularly attending meetings on a weekly basis, or at least more than one time a month. Because I would not have time to go to meetings even one day a month I have no interest, I know they believe they have the secrets of the universe but I believe those secrets can be found elsewhere, they believe they make good men better, I believe that may be true, but I do believe good men can become better and even great elsewhere.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 09:16 AM
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Originally posted by Razimus
Basically from what I've read, it is disrespectful to join if you don't intend on regularly attending meetings on a weekly basis, or at least more than one time a month. Because I would not have time to go to meetings even one day a month I have no interest,
That's a reasonable response.


I know they believe they have the secrets of the universe
We don't, actually. Nor do we claim to. Just some tools to help you try to lead a better life.

but I believe those secrets can be found elsewhere,
They can, in all the world's philosophies and religions.

they believe they make good men better, I believe that may be true, but I do believe good men can become better and even great elsewhere.
Sure. Nobody ever claimed Masonry was the only way to do it. It's just one path, and one that works well for a lot of people. The main difference, I suppose, is in how Masonry imparts its teachings—the allegorical play as a mode of instruction dates back to the ancient Greeks, but it's not the kind of thing you'll find in formal western educational systems today. That's actually why I joined—because I'd never learned in that manner before.

As I like to say, sure, you don't need a group to become a better person. And you can do good works by yourself without joining anything. You can go down to the Red Cross and donate blood, and that's a perfectly good thing to do. But if you're with a group, and can help organize a blood drive that gets 100 units of blood donated, well, there's strength in numbers, and you'll find you can actually achieve more than you could have on your own.



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 09:21 AM
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Originally posted by The Sword
I believe that this sounds right up my alley.

I just have mixed opinions on the Freemasons.
Feel free to ask, if you have specific questions. There are dozens of us here, more than happy to discuss things.





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