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State agencies, colleges demand applicants' Facebook passwords

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posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:28 AM
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I think more and more people are waking up to the Orwellian nature of social media. It's possible a few years from now facebook will be DOA. People are already wise to their privacy schemes, people are also "de-friending" to a more realistic and factual number, now this whole employment issue and BOOM! - It's not so fun anymore.




posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:30 AM
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Originally posted by soficrow

State agencies, colleges demand applicants' Facebook passwords


redtape.msnbc.msn.com

If you think privacy settings on your Facebook and Twitter accounts guarantee future employers or schools can't see your private posts, guess again.
Employers and colleges find the treasure-trove of personal information hiding behind password-protected accounts and privacy walls just too tempting, and some are demanding full access from job applicants and student athletes.
In Maryland, job seekers applying to the state's Department of Corrections have been asked during interviews to log in
(visit the link for the full news article)



S&F Excellent info. I'm so glad I never trusted Facebook -- or any social site.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by jrod
 



Reminds me a lot of Huxley's Brave New World.


...Just "a lot"?

S&



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by KillerQueen
 


Originally posted by KillerQueen
Some employers are even rating your on-line influence. I guess to see if you could bring in the business and generally how savvy you are at marketing - yourself..

www.snid.eu...



Youtube runs on that principle (just one example).

S&




edit on 6/3/12 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:35 AM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 



Then you have a moral decision to make. Do you want to work for a company that violates the first amendment?


...I don't want to live in a country that violates the First Amendment - but I do.

There are few to NO jobs available. The real questions are:

1. What are the options?

and

2. How do we create more and better alternatives?











edit on 6/3/12 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:37 AM
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reply to post by KillerQueen
 


I dug up this old thread. I think Huxley's dystopia is closer to what we are experiencing today.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by MissPoovey
I also killed my facebook account years ago. 2006 I think.
Recently I bought a smartphone. Then found out it was all "googled up" and returned it. Then after figuring out how to prevent most of the google following, repurchased the phone.
Now I am amazed at the privacy rules on the Ap's. I have no Applications because I refuse to allow the Ap. to know everything and do everything.
The most innocent application wants to be allowed to know all my contacts, be able to adjust my settings and control my phone remotely... what is up with that?
Sorry... did not mean to derail the thread.


Excellent, means they don't have to microchip all of their slaves.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


These things happen all the time. Sometimes the agencies and companies are caught, sometimes they are not.

What is really hard is to get people to call them on it when they are.

And a lot of people don't know their own rights.

But agencies do come under fire for civil rights violations.

And I have had to face these deciions myself, and they are difficult.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:48 AM
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Originally posted by Eidolon23
People might adapt to this by maintaining a "clean" Facebook account. I guess your Facebook page is only as discreet as your friends allow it to be, but many will probably cease to post delicate details of their private lives on a public site.


That may be a good idea -- a "clean" FB page with only "Establishment approved" material on it -- for official use only.
I could never understand why anyone would want to post "delicate details of their privates lives" online under their real name.

Love the artwork in your avatar -- reminds me of Kay Nielsen's work after WWI -- his Art Deco phase.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by jrod
 


Or a bit of both. They use Huxleyan distractions to usher in Orwellian controls. We're too overwhelmed and addicted to notice.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:51 AM
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Beat them at their own game...



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:53 AM
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I would ask for my employers email login and password and facebook credentials as well, and say I just want to be sure I'm not working for a criminal or child pornographer.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:53 AM
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Originally posted by soficrow

That's what I did when Facebook froze my account and demanded my personal info, including ID. I said delete my account please but they didn't - and I still get a mailbox full of Facebook crap - with no access to my own account.





Would you run that by me again? I'm not on FB so I don't know how it works. Are you saying you are not allowed to erase your info when you quit?



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:55 AM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Originally posted by soficrow
reply to post by nixie_nox
 



Then you have a moral decision to make. Do you want to work for a company that violates the first amendment?


...I don't want to live in a country that violates the First Amendment - but I do.

There are few to NO jobs available. The real questions are:

1. What are the options?

and

2. How do we create more and better alternatives?





post by nixie_nox
These things happen all the time. Sometimes the agencies and companies are caught, sometimes they are not.

What is really hard is to get people to call them on it when they are.

And a lot of people don't know their own rights.

But agencies do come under fire for civil rights violations.

And I have had to face these deciions myself, and they are difficult.


The point is, demanding a password is illegal, but extorting "friend" status isn't - especially if it happens during an interview. …People are complying because they really have no other options.

Maybe a legal case can be made to define the practice as extortion - but as you say, these decisions are "difficult" - and few people are in a position to pursue legal action (unemployment, looming bankruptcies and foreclosures, etc.).

So we're back to my questions:

1. What are the options? [Rhetorical - there aren't many, if any.]

2. How do we create more and better alternatives? [Dead serious.]


With respect and thanks,
sofi





edit on 6/3/12 by soficrow because: format



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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I have a facebook and I listed my religion as Rastafarian. That is public information but I am certain that an employer or even law enforcement could use that information against me, be it more 'random' drug screens or something far more sinister. Frankly I don't care, I am not scared, and I am not afraid to stand up for what I believe in.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:59 AM
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..gosh, so what's next?...'they' gunna ask you what kind of music you listen to, what kind of movies do you watch, what kind of books do you read......oh, wait.....sorry , forgot that FB is all that AND a bag of chips


the govt wants to know more about us and our habbits for all sorts of reasons, 'they' have tried repeatedly to centralize our info, but they public doesn't want it (REAL ID, ect) but..................we freely do centralize it online for all the world to see. showcasing our lives and opinions to anyone who will read it. i want privacy like everybody else but i realize that on the web is not really the best place for it. it does give an opportunity for expresion that otherwise may not have happened AND has given a portal to others, people who we wouldn't befriend in physical life and wouldn't share some thoughts and opinions with. we dug our own hole..sorta of a mute point now 'cause its all over but the cryin'



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 11:01 AM
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Originally posted by KillerQueen
reply to post by jrod
 


Or a bit of both. They use Huxleyan distractions to usher in Orwellian controls. We're too overwhelmed and addicted to notice.


Yes, I agree. Both Huxley and Orwell were right. One does not necessarily exclude the other.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 11:01 AM
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If they fired me using my facebook information, I would sue them for discrimination, and unlawful access of computer information across state lines, pain suffering, lost wages, humiliation, violation of my privacy, stealing personal information, conspiracy to commit crimes using personal information, just to start off. I would keep adding to the list of things.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 11:02 AM
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People can combat this easily! Start another account, a dummy account of sorts that has nothing but rainbows and cats in it!

The other issue I find disturbing is that people share private info every day. Try getting furniture from a rent to own store without submitting a SIN! The ONLY time you are supposed to submit your SIN is only WHEN you get a job. These RTO companies do not rent to you if you don't add it to your application for furniture. How many other companies do this? Many!

Even when you are walking home, the police can demand to see your drivers license!



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Options: Create a business related page via a professional media site (LinkdIn as an example) and provide that site as a reference/addendum to the resume. You're being up front, you're showing you have some knowledge of current technology and strategies for good use, etc. If asked about other sites used, be honest and state that either you do not use them or that they are for "family" only. You are showing that you are able to separate personal from work and showing good judgement by exempting anyone who does not fit that category from access.

This really comes down to presentation in the interview. Are you confident and able to project that,while establishging boundaries and without alienating the potential employer? If so, that shows you can play the politics of the job and that also is a good quality in an employee. This is about attitude and presentation. How do you package yourself?

Business Schools are teaching strategies to students now, people will know how to handle these situations as as they crop up more and more. Those who don't adapt, will be left behind or seek employment where it is not an issue.


edit on 6-3-2012 by LadySkadi because: (no reason given)




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