It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

State agencies, colleges demand applicants' Facebook passwords

page: 2
39
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 08:47 AM
link   
reply to post by soficrow
 


These companies protect these passwords so strictly that now people are having trouble accessing the sites of teh deceased. This is starting to become a huge issue. Even if the creator dies, the sites won't let those that inheritors, have the information,a nd there maybe accounting or other information in emails or something else.

So what these agencies are doing is forcing people to breach a contract.
edit on 6-3-2012 by nixie_nox because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 08:49 AM
link   
reply to post by marg6043
 


I understand that, but that doesn't stop people from still hacking it. Cyber security is starting to become the biggest threat to the US.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 08:54 AM
link   
Social media, slick iphones and ipads, 24/7 access, We are slaves to technology. This technology which is meant to make life easier and more connected ends up making it more complicated and possibly hindering us. It seems like every month reveals a new way in which it is used to oppress and control us.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 08:59 AM
link   
abandon facebook and twitter, if you value any privacy. send the message back "no thanks!"



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 09:07 AM
link   
reply to post by KillerQueen
 


Its a double edged sword.

I saw a picture the other day of a solider in Afghanistan watching his daughter being born through webcam. Ten years ago, that would not of been possible, he would of gotten a letter and a picture.
So it ialso does amazing things.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 09:18 AM
link   
People might adapt to this by maintaining a "clean" Facebook account. I guess your Facebook page is only as discreet as your friends allow it to be, but many will probably cease to post delicate details of their private lives on a public site.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 09:24 AM
link   
reply to post by Eidolon23
 


I do have a huge issue with fb for that. That you get tagged in photos by friends, I think it needs to ask your permission.

Again, while job hunting, a friend got nostalgic and posted senior week pictures.

sigh



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 09:31 AM
link   
reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Well, you can de-tag photos, but I agree. I know it would be a pain, but they ought to give a permission option. I might not have time to de-tag that photo of me making out with a Box Elder tree before a prospective employer happens upon it.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 09:39 AM
link   
reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Agreed.

IMO there is a tipping point, a point in time where the benefit out weighed the cost. As people are starting to lose job opportunities, divorce and commit suicide because of it, I'd say we are way past the tipping point.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 09:48 AM
link   
reply to post by KillerQueen
 


I am torn. To me, it seems that when people choose to engage in activities like infidelity, binge drinking, or gossiping; they are now documenting what they used to hide. The damage is more immediate this way, but was hiding any better? The long term damage any less?

If you want a part of yourself or your activities to be private, there are ways to ensure it doesn't end up on the internet. To fail to take those precautions almost signals to me a desire to be caught out. Everybody is hanging out their dirty laundry. We get to see what we used to hide from each other.

I wonder if there couldn't be a positive upshot?



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 09:58 AM
link   
There a a few jobs that require a Top Secret security clearance where it would be a good idea, maybe even necessary for the employer to know one's social media and email passwords. For a college or prison guard job demanding such information is just insane.

I am sure many applicants in need of work will bend over and give a would be employer this information. I probably would too, but I would give out phony passwords and if they ever called me out for it I would simply say I change my passwords on a weekly basis for security purposes and have a business card of a good civil rights lawyer handy if they really wanted to push the issue.

Our technology is enslaving the masses and our privacy is disappearing. Reminds me a lot of Huxley's Brave New World.
edit on 6-3-2012 by jrod because: typO



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:00 AM
link   
reply to post by jrod
 


I agree with you. And I would do it because the higher security clearence you have, the more job opportunities you have.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:07 AM
link   
Some employers are even rating your on-line influence. I guess to see if you could bring in the business and generally how savvy you are at marketing - yourself..

www.snid.eu...



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:14 AM
link   
reply to post by KillerQueen
 


Now you hit on an interesting point.

How good of a free advertiser can you be?



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:15 AM
link   
reply to post by MissPoovey
 



I have no Applications because I refuse to allow the Ap. to know everything and do everything.
The most innocent application wants to be allowed to know all my contacts, be able to adjust my settings and control my phone remotely... what is up with that?
Sorry... did not mean to derail the thread.


Not a derailment - related and extremely relevant.

S&



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:19 AM
link   
reply to post by nixie_nox
 



what these agencies are doing is forcing people to breach a contract.


Exactly.


The Facebook contract explicitly prohibits members from giving their password to anyone else. Refusing to comply with that demand is easy and defensible.

But what about the agencies, organizations and corporations that extort "friend" status? Applicants comply because they don't want to lose scarce opportunities, and the law is less applicable.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:21 AM
link   
reply to post by soficrow
 


Then you have a moral decision to make. Do you want to work for a company that violates the first amendment?



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:21 AM
link   
reply to post by LittleBlackEagle
 



abandon facebook and twitter, if you value any privacy. send the message back "no thanks!"



That's what I did when Facebook froze my account and demanded my personal info, including ID. I said delete my account please but they didn't - and I still get a mailbox full of Facebook crap - with no access to my own account.





posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:27 AM
link   
reply to post by nixie_nox
 


When a person is broke, hungry and in need of a paycheck they are not concerned about their Bill of Rights anymore.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:27 AM
link   
reply to post by nixie_nox
 



Its a double edged sword.


All the greatest, best and finest things in life seem to have that capacity, don't they? ...Kinda like when kids fight over a toy, and parents take it away - along with the kids' opportunity to learn to work together. I suspect if parents used those moments to teach kids to share and cooperate (when the stakes are minimal), we'd all be better able to do right when the stakes are real.




new topics

top topics



 
39
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join