Senator Barry Goldwater UFO Files Now posted (Very Interesting-so far)

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posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


Go into photoshop/paint or any other editing software. Run a line across the bottom of the text on the lines, and then down the margin.

Measure the distance.... look at the line....

Now do it with your document....measure the distance between lines....angle of the line...if anything intrudes upon the line.

Its simple




Nice and symmetrical, everything lines up...as on a computer.



Then your version.....look at the words that are lost behind the red line....deviations of the hammer/bar/typewriter.
edit on 5-3-2012 by loves a conspiricy because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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Yawn... the document in question could have been done on an electric typewriter. Say maybe an IBM selectric typewriter introduced in 1961. It would have produced even, consistent strokes much like a modern printer. And before you get into a font tizzy, yes the fonts could be changed and done quite easily since they were on a device called a typeball. Younger posters unfamiliar with typewriters would easily dismiss the notion of an electric typewriter since they've mainly seen only manual ones in action.

So loves a conspiricy, what else do you got in your debunking bag? Because this angle has been torpedoed.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by loves a conspiricy
 


This letter here looks pretty well alligned.
www.lelands.com... l-Content

Was it done on a computer, too?



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


Looks like an IBM Selectric or similar brand to me...



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by CAPT PROTON
 


So now everyone owned a $500 typewriter.........which today is what $4000-$4500.

I dont think so
I dont know anyone who could have paid $500 back in 67 for a typewriter.

Fair enough, big companies and some government departments may have one, but they were certainly not the norm for everyday folk.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by CAPT PROTON
 


I agree. I think lovesaconspiricy is really grasping at straws. Typewriters were much better than he believes them to be. Unless the person was using a typewriter that had mechanical problems or they were manually winding/adjusting the wheel after each line, the line spacing was usually consistant and evenly spaced.
edit on 5-3-2012 by Afterthought because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by loves a conspiricy
 


True, but Mr. Barry Goldwater was not an "everyday folk".



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:13 AM
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We're not talking everyone. The letter in question is by Barry Goldwater or more likely his secretary. So yes, most likely he would have had a Selectric for official business. Cost is a moot point. He had the cash, and would have purchased a good quality machine for polished letters. This isn't some share cropper you know.

So now that point is blown out of the water. What else you got?



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by CAPT PROTON
 


The question is....what else have you got?

A few letters to and fro is what? Evidence of aliens? lol

So what, he wanted to know what was in an army base and was refused. If a government is to keep its secrets (weapons/jets/etc) safe they stick to a "need to know" basis.

If the letters are legit, it adds no weight to existence of aliens. Just a person who believes, asking others for information he is not entitled to.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by loves a conspiricy
 


He was more than simply refused, he was basicly fired, then black balled by the UN according to some of his correspondences.
Did you even read any of the letters?



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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man this sad debunk attempt needs to just go away... absolutely absurd assumptions with no evidence, even the doc you so carefully took time to draw lines on which you claim the font is faked and perfectly lined up... doesn't even line up at all! there's millimeter deviation like every 2 or 3 letters, some of them are partly overlapping the red line at the very bottom, some sit just on top of it. you should be very embarrassed sir. just what IS your motivation?? seems to be a total influx of people who called bluff on UFOs and aliens at the very beginning; now the attempts to debunk are just getting more and more feeble and the assumed level of superior logic that was assumed by joining the skeptic camp is crumbling. it just seems like the quicker anyone is to jump on potentially legitimate information leaks like this with a gung-ho debunking theory the more desperate and clueless they look. you say you have dealt with not being listened to before, may i suggest thinking about your theories a little more and researching what you throw on the table before anything has been discussed by open-minded people??

will read these all later, sounds like pretty standard stuff. the numbers of professionals in the military etc who are standing behind ufo sightings is just too overwhelming to ignore. if you are willing to condemn these hundreds of people putting their careers and lives on the line as dishonest or mentally ill, then i think that says a lot about you and your faith and connection with humanity. take everything with a pinch of salt obviously; but at some point one must embrace the implications of even simply ONE of these accounts being true.

something big is happening this year.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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My father was in the US Navy from 1959 to 1985 as a Yeoman.

I remembered him using an IBM Selectric when I was a kid in the 70's. I just got off the phone with him and asked what he was using in 1967. His answer:

"I was using a Selectric by then, but that's because I was stationed in Newport. Guys on ships were still using old manuals. But by 1970, everyone had the Selectric."

I remember learning to type on a Selectric II in high school.

I asked my dad about things not lining up. He said a few cuss words, and reminded me that I was in the Navy too, hehehe. Then he understood what I meant. Here was his answer:

"You never were an Admiral's Writer. You think a flag officer would sign a letter that was all misaligned? The whole point of taking short hand was to quickly jot down what the Admiral wanted to say, and then spend quite a long time making it look nice on his stationary."

Just my input. Selectrics were around by then, and yes, those that typed even before then, especially if it was high level letters would take a lot of time making it look good, and aligned.

edit on 5-3-2012 by eriktheawful because: spelling



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 06:27 PM
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I used to be a disbursing clerk 2nd class before we became personnel specialists and I can tell you, every command I've been to, whether sharing an office with other people or having my own office, there was always one constant: an electric typewriter. So, if the government can spring for an electric typewriter for an office ran by one disbursing clerk who wasn't even a 1st class then a person of Goldwater's status definitely had one.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 07:05 PM
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"There is also a key letter written to Goldwater by Marie Galbraith who directed the “best Available Evidence” report that was prepared for Laurance Rockefeller in 1996."

In later life, Rockefeller became interested in UFOs. In 1993, along with his niece, Anne Bartley, the stepdaughter of Winthrop Rockefeller and the then-president of the Rockefeller Family Fund, he established the UFO Disclosure Initiative to the Clinton White House. They asked for all UFO information held by the government, including from the CIA and the US Air Force, to be declassified and released to the public. The first and most important test case where declassification had to apply, according to Rockefeller, was the Roswell UFO incident. In September 1994, the Air Force categorically denied the incident was UFO-related. Rockefeller briefed Clinton on the results of his initiative in 1995. Clinton did produce an Executive Order in late 1994 to declassify numerous documents in the National Archives, but this did not specifically refer to UFO-related files.

He also had an interest, gained via his mother Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, in Buddhism and Asian cultural affairs. He funded the research of Harvard Medical School Professor Dr. John Edward Mack, author of Passport to the Cosmos. He also supported the work of Dr. Steven M. Greer of the Disclosure Project.


en.wikipedia.org...

Interesting



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 07:23 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 08:31 PM
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Reply to post by Afterthought
 


I have been around typewriters also, since the mid 80s, I have no idea what the heck he is trying to point out. And you are right, the government uses the best of the best of the best. The debunkers are getting lazier day by day.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 09:43 PM
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Can we talk less about margins/fonts etc and more about aliens??? Just saying...



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:17 PM
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Too bad there has been so many attempts to side track the thread.

Keep reviewing folks. I haven't seen anything to convince me these aren't real.

And, you don't here his family/foundation/library saying anything to the contrary.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 12:53 AM
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Originally posted by loves a conspiricy
reply to post by CAPT PROTON
 


The question is....what else have you got?

A few letters to and fro is what? Evidence of aliens? lol

So what, he wanted to know what was in an army base and was refused. If a government is to keep its secrets (weapons/jets/etc) safe they stick to a "need to know" basis.

If the letters are legit, it adds no weight to existence of aliens. Just a person who believes, asking others for information he is not entitled to.


I usually enjoy your posts, however I disagree with you here, as others have pointed out there were very decent typewriters at the time, that could print letters with great precision and consistency.


The IBM Selectric typewriter was a highly successful model line of electric typewriters introduced by IBM on July 31, 1961


Old IBM Advertisement.

I think we should be reviewing these materials before making judgement on them.

-B
edit on 6-3-2012 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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The letter was likely written on an IBM electric typewriter in vogue at the time, which had an electric return button (like Enter today on your computer), and used a spherical printhead. They were very accurate. To change fonts, you merely replaced the spherical printhead with another of equal size and different font. Like Captain Proton said above, it was an IBM Selectric. Here's one: www.google.com...:&imgrefurl=http://tinalewisrowe.com/2008/02/13/ibm-correct ing-selectric/&docid=v_TBUr5weTO45M&imgurl=http://tinalewisrowe.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/02/ibm-correcting-selectric-iii-red.jpg&w=1195&h=1139&ei=a LVVT_2ZLsjYiAKXn4XqBw&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=141&sig=100009807927181474526&page=1&tbnh=172&tbnw=185&start=0&ndsp=8&ved=1t:429,r:3,s:0&tx=72&ty=79
e dit on 6-3-2012 by jimscott because: Name of typewriter and image.
edit on 6-3-2012 by jimscott because: (no reason given)





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