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X-Class Solar Flare. (just happened)

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posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:03 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


That's always a risk. I was just looking and it looks like the sunspot is still growing as it turns twoard us. Could be a busy week for communication networks.




posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:06 PM
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Originally posted by GeminiTwin
Perhaps this solar flare helped contribute to the new fissure eruptions in Hawaii near Pu`u O`o that happened yesterday. I believe this is in Volcano National Park and is already a very active area, but I'm no expert. Anyone with more knowledge of this subject care to share if this activity is out of norm?

Here's a link to some very cool videos that were taken very close to the fissure eruptions. Hope this posts correctly as I'm new here.

pacificislandparks.com...


That would be interesting if they were related. Another member put a thread about the possibillity of this producing earthquakes that was interesting. It is linked on the 2nd or 3rd page of this thread if you are interested.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


lol. Thats funny.

I'm surprised this is'nt obvious to everybody.

Sun = gynormous.

Something I've come to accept since the day i realized the sun doesn't get put out in the ocean as it goes over the horizon. That day.... yesterday.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:03 PM
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Originally posted by ClydeFrog42
reply to post by intrptr
 

lol. Thats funny.
I'm surprised this is'nt obvious to everybody.
Sun = gynormous.
Something I've come to accept since the day i realized the sun doesn't get put out in the ocean as it goes over the horizon. That day.... yesterday.

Yah, thats pretty funny... You reminded me: my dad used to tell me to listen for the hissing of steam when the sun touched the water. It was really hard cause the noise of the ocean sort of covered it. There we were standing on the beach together with our hands to our ears, leaning forward, straining...

Cracks me up now when I think of it.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:12 PM
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Originally posted by GeminiTwin
Perhaps this solar flare helped contribute to the new fissure eruptions in Hawaii near Pu`u O`o that happened yesterday. I believe this is in Volcano National Park and is already a very active area, but I'm no expert. Anyone with more knowledge of this subject care to share if this activity is out of norm?

Here's a link to some very cool videos that were taken very close to the fissure eruptions. Hope this posts correctly as I'm new here.

pacificislandparks.com...

That was awesome... Thanks for bringing it! Is that this year? The date on the site says 2011?



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by usmc0311
 


For what it's worth I got 5 alerts today on my cell phone running the Solaris Alpha app.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:42 PM
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Auroras are starting to pick up from the M-Class flare from the other day.

helios.swpc.noaa.gov...




posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:45 PM
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OOOH, will we be able to view the Auroras in the next couple of days? I hope so. That would be like totally cool to get it on camera. When should we go out and look and about what time do you think it will happen towards the Eastern side?
edit on 5-3-2012 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


The x flare isn't going to hit us dead on, but a glancing blow could still spark some auroras. This sunspot could deffinitely produce more flares and give us some great auroras in the lower 48. If only I lived on Lake Superior. That is one of the best places in the lower 48 to view auroras when they get rockin.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:57 PM
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Ah bummer, hopefully will get a little glimpse. That would just be totally wild and breathtaking to see.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 04:27 AM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


do you realize how big the sun is???????? it's 109 times bigger than our little rock.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 04:32 AM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


please stop talking just to talk

thank you



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by usmc0311
 


Go get a good inexpensive pair of welders glasses they are better for you. I have a pair that flip up so I can see what I am doing too!

It was Cloudy yesterday but if it is not today when I get off from work I will do some photographing if not as soon as the weather is clear!

I will make my first post about this sunspot I think



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by Ilyich
reply to post by Manhater
 


do you realize how big the sun is???????? it's 109 times bigger than our little rock.


That depends on how you interpret the word "bigger"


Both Sun and the Earth are sort of almost perfect spheres. The Sun’s equatorial diameter is 1,391,400 Km and the Eearth’s equatorial diameter is 12,756 km. If you do the calculations the Sun is about 109 times bigger than Earth. If by size you mean volume, then the sun occupies about 10^3, or over 1,295,000 times the volume of the Earth. In case you want to go step further and compared them by mass, then the Sun has a mass of about 1.99*10^30 kg, and the Earth’s mass is 5.98*10^24 kg, thus the Sun is about 332,776 times as huge as the Earth. This is different from the ratio of their volumes because the Earth has a larger average density than the Sun.




Source



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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X-5 flare just happened. Well this one should give us some auroras I hope. Also expect some communication blackouts.

www.spaceweather.com...


MAJOR SOLAR FLARE: Earth-orbiting satellites have just detected an X5-class solar flare from big sunspot AR1429. The blast peaked on March 7th at 00:28 UT. Radiation storms and radio blackouts are possible.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by usmc0311
 


I am guessing that this X5 will be much closer of an impact than the X1 from the other day. That sunspot is huuuuuge. I might even get some aurora where I live in a couple days... I think it is supposed to remain clear out too.


Comms blackouts would be a good thing for me. Need an excuse to unplug for a day or two.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 08:54 PM
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reply to post by nydsdan
 


Here is a link to an auroral site that will tell you how to figure out if you will be able to see them by the data.

helios.swpc.noaa.gov...

Just click on the viewing auroras tab and it will show you how to find your magnetic lattitude and what the kp index needs to be to produce auroras in your area.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 09:51 PM
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I just put in my coordinates and I have no clue how to read it.


Magnetic view is 45.0M 10++

So what does that mean, I may or may not be able to view it? Or, I have 45% chance of seeing it?



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:12 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


I believe the expected viewline is at 48. I sit at 52 and 9kp here so I should see some, but keep your eyes peeled if you have a clear northern view. You may catch glimpses as it hits. The best time will be when the sun is completely opposite from us so that the solar wind is blowing staight over us.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 10:18 PM
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We have had extreme weather here in the Midwest with 50mph sustained winds and gusts far greater, this always happens when we have a sunspot explode, I would hate to see the energy of one when it does face the earth,,,

and I do think it will happen in the next year or so.

Edit: And Yep, there go the astounding auroras too...
edit on 6-3-2012 by antar because: (no reason given)






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