NASA discovers gigantic structures 25,000 light-years tall at center of milky way.

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posted on Mar, 4 2012 @ 10:22 PM
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That's effin' beautiful!




posted on Mar, 4 2012 @ 11:20 PM
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Originally posted by CraigSnedeker
That's effin' beautiful!
Yes it is,the cgi artist did a very good job depicting what scientists think this super massive,violet colored bubble,near and around the milkyway galaxy...might look like...



posted on Mar, 4 2012 @ 11:50 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by LilDudeissocool
 


If the Milky Way had its own magnetic field that was strong enough to form such structures, we should expect to see jets rather than plumes... much like a Pulsar. As charged particles interact with a strong magnetic field, they are channelled to the poles where they escape in a spiralling, energetic, particle jet. They don't form plumes.

This may be more closely related to a galaxy-scale hypernova-esque event, as is suggested in the NASA link above (one of their suggestions, linking it to early energetic star formation).

As for the possibility of a galactic magnetic field...
Geomagnetic fields are generated by the interaction between the electric field of the outer (molten metal) core and the inner (solid metal) core having different rotation speeds. Solar magnetic fields are generated by a similar rotation differential (shear), with the electric field sustained by the ionized gas.
Any electric field sustained by the ionized gases throughout the galaxy - the interstellar medium - would be minuscule (no matter what the Electric Universe folk say); though, in fact, the interstellar medium does sustain very chaotic galactic magnetic fields. Also, the shear caused by the central black hole's difference in rotation wouldn't do much to help it. If anything could cause a cohesive, galactic magnetic field, it's the central supermassive black hole itself (and getting a black hole to have a magnetic field is another issue). This is another possible source of the plumes, though, again, we would expect jets instead.

So, again, a galactic magnetic field shouldn't lead to the plumes we observe. They should lead to energetic particle jets.



Lets concentrate then on, Q- " it's the central supermassive black hole itself (and getting a black hole to have a magnetic field is another issue). This is another possible source of the plumes, though, again, we would expect jets instead."

If this is true then can the plumes are a product of the same dynamic? The same dynamic being, "Geomagnetic fields are generated by the interaction between the electric field of the outer (molten metal) core and the inner (solid metal) core having different rotation speeds. Solar magnetic fields are generated by a similar rotation differential (shear), with the electric field sustained by the ionized gas." ?

An interaction between electricity and magnetism. Why are so many electrons present? The collection of gamma rays are apart of stars being born. There is a lot of that process going on in the location of the center of the Milky Way, but so many electrons? Why? Is there a process of high energy collisions happening? Is the center of our galaxy acting as a super collider? As super collider is a series of upload.wikimedia.org... after all.

I'm just poking in the dark here. I'm just asking if this is a possibility?

I do appreciate you taking the time dealing with my ignorance.


PS
The plumes maybe are a precursor to a jet?

I read the answers you gave to my questions in pm. I guess I am asking again because I don't fully comprehend why jets have to be created so soon in the process. The plumes doing something like this> upload.wikimedia.org... Not in the same way, but with a similar dynamic in mind. Does that make sense? I dunno how else to articulate what I am asking.
edit on 5-3-2012 by LilDudeissocool because: I added a PS.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by LilDudeissocool
 
Maybe this gigantic violet colored structure is like a magnetic field,but also like the aurora borealis seen hear on earth,only on a super massive scale and size? An aurora is caused by the collision of energetic charged particles with atoms in the high altitude atmosphere and the charged particles originate in the magnetosphere...

edit on 5-3-2012 by blocula because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by LilDudeissocool
 


It's not possible to just have plumes instead of jets. The mechanism responsible for sending particles out into space (the strong magnetic field) is what accelerates them to near the speed of light, which fires them out like a laser.

However... along those lines, this may be evidence that our galaxy used to be a quasar a few billion years ago. Quasars are active galactic nuclei which send out jets of high-energy particles. If the early Milky Way were a quasar, then these jets would long since have stopped, leaving behind these balloon-like regions of high-energy electrons. That's very possible.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 08:36 PM
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Is it possible that these are in someway connected with the Super Massive BlackHole at the Galactic center ?



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by essanance
Is it possible that these are in someway connected with the Super Massive BlackHole at the Galactic center ?


Yes a very strong probability that they are connected the central black hole



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 08:56 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


No, its only picked up with certain equipment that pick up the gamma rays. Its not particles, its Gamma Rays and I highly recommend Pane Andov's research:

paneandov.com...

Also, this event roughly equates the processional wobble, 26,000 year cycle. Roughly the same distance in light years to the galactic center.

Which I think explains alot.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


It's a region of highly energetic electrons. These electrons are exciting photons to the gamma ray range. That's where the gamma rays that we detect are coming from.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by Unity_99
 


It's a region of highly energetic electrons. These electrons are exciting photons to the gamma ray range. That's where the gamma rays that we detect are coming from.
And gamma rays travel at light speed and this massive violet bubble is 25,000 light years across,does that also mean that our milkyway galaxy is only 25,000 years old? because the charged electrons could only be emanating from our galaxy for as long as the galaxy has been here,before the galaxy existed,there would be no electrons...

And 25,000 light years is equal to > 1.46962495 × 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 miles across...

edit on 5-3-2012 by blocula because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by blocula
 


Nope, that just means that the plumes have existed for at least 25000 years. In fact, their source is probably older...they were probably first formed back when the galaxy formed, a few billion years ago. Since then, their source is long gone, but the plumes of high-energy electrons (not simply charged, which all electrons are... these electrons are ultrarelativistic, or very-near-light-speed) remain, and remained at least up until a few thousand years ago, though they probably still exist if they lasted that long.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:13 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 
Hmmmm?...Okay,maybe...But the charged electrons which make up this 25,000 light year sized violet plume can only exist for as long as the galaxy has been here and the galaxy can only exist for as long as the electrons have been here,there cant be one without the other and so they both must have existed for the same amount of time,how is that not true?

And so our galaxy must be only 25,000 years old.Because the electrons are going to start emanating from the galaxy as soon as the galaxy came into existence,its not like the electrons are going to wait around a few million or billion years and then start realeasing themselves into a plume,thats going to start happening right away,how is that not true?

Lets say that our milkyway galaxy is a billion years old,then this electron plume should also be a billion light years across,not just 25,000 and so as big across as this electron plume is,is also how old our galaxy must be,25,000 years,how is that not true?
edit on 5-3-2012 by blocula because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by blocula
reply to post by CLPrime
 


... and the galaxy can only exist for as long as the electrons have been here,there cant be one without the other and so they both must have existed for the same amount of time,how is that not true? and so our galaxy must be only 25,000 years old.Because the electrons are going to start emanating from the galaxy as soon as the galaxy came into existence,its not like the electrons are going to wait around a few million years and then realease themselves into a plume,thats going to start happening right away,how would they not?


It's not a standard process for the Milky Way to be producing these electrons. The plumes were probably formed in a single massive event. For instance, they may have been from a brief period of star formation a few million years ago. The Milky Way existed for billions of years before that.
Compare the plumes to a vehicle's exhaust. Exhaust is only expelled when the vehicle is running, right? In the same way, the plume were only created when the process that formed them was "running" as well. The process probably wasn't running for the entire history of the Milky Way.

But, even if the plumes were created when the Milky Way first formed, why can't they be older than 25000 years? They can be 10 billion years old, and, as long as they still existed up until at least 25000 years ago, we'd still see them. What we're seeing is those plumes up until 25000 years ago, but that certainly doesn't mean they didn't exist before then. That's like saying your best friend didn't exist before you met him.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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Originally posted by blocula
reply to post by CLPrime
 


Lets say that if our milkyway galaxy is a billion years old,then this electron plume should also be a billion light years across,not just 25,000 and so as big across as this electron plume is,is also how old our galaxy must be,how is that not true?


Why? The plumes aren't growing at the speed of light.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:39 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 
Electrons travel at the speed of light in a vacum if they are interacting with a medium,which in this case their medium is the milkyway galaxy > en.wikipedia.org...

edit on 5-3-2012 by blocula because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by blocula
 


Electrons do not travel at the speed of light under any conditions, and the Wikipedia article on Electrons confirms what I say. Electrons can, at high energies, approach (but not reach) the speed of light, and that's exactly what these electrons have done.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by blocula
 


Electrons do not travel at the speed of light under any conditions, and the Wikipedia article on Electrons confirms what I say. Electrons can, at high energies, approach (but not reach) the speed of light, and that's exactly what these electrons have done.
Read under motion and energy in the link because it says there that electrons temporarily travel faster than light in a dielectric medium.As they interact with the dielectric medium,they generate a faint light called Cherenkov radiation > en.wikipedia.org...

Dielectric Material > whatis.techtarget.com...
edit on 5-3-2012 by blocula because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by blocula
 


Okay...seems we need a physics lesson.
Light has two different velocities: phase velocity and group velocity. Phase velocity is the speed of the phase of the light wave (I usually compare this to the speed of waves moving through water). Group velocity, on the other hand, is the speed of the photons themselves (akin to the speed of the water).

In the case of light, phase velocity can be changed (it can even be negative - in the opposite direction as the photon's direction, in the same way water waves can, in theory, travel upstream), but group velocity (the speed of the photons) cannot be changed under any circumstances.
It is the phase velocity which changes in different media. Electrons can travel faster than the phase velocity of light in any given medium, thereby producing Cherenkov radiation, but this is not the same as those electrons travelling faster than the actual, physical speed of light (its group velocity), which can never happen...ever.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


I agree I've always thought that to myself as well. I've always thought that we could be the cells of the planet, and the planet could be one of the organs of our universe and so on and so on, and I feel that this loop is infinite, and all things at the end of the day work together in harmony for the better functioning of something bigger. This is also why our world is doing so #ty because we (the people of earth) are not working in synchronization or looking at the bigger picture, everyone is looking out for him/herself without a care to what happens to the person next to them; we're behaving like cancerous cells which we all know eventually leads to death if not treated. Take time to appreciate the awesome beauty of our universe once in a while. It might just change your mind state simply by acknowledging that our universe is a spectacle of mysterious and boundless beauty.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 04:49 PM
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very cool, i wonder if it is moving and expanding or if they are somewhat static





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