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Gas prices? What about WATER prices? Expected to TRIPLE

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posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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But eh, no inflation... and you don't need water right? Oh wait, if you don't have water, you die within 3 days.... oops.

Water bills expected to triple in some parts of U.S.

Study finds repairing, expanding drinking water system to cost at least $1 trillion

Many consumers could see their water bills double or even triple, as the country attempts to overhaul its aging water system over the next 25 years.

A new study by the American Water Works Association found that repairing and expanding the U.S. drinking water system between 2011 and 2035 will cost at least $1 trillion, an amount that will largely be paid for by jacking up household water bills.

"The amounts will vary depending on community size and geographic region, but in some communities these infrastructure costs alone could triple the size of a typical family's water bills," the report said.


You think of collecting rain water? Remember 2000 in Bolivia... Bechtel bought the water suppliers in the country... and privatized rain water. People were poor so they collected rain water... Bechtel thought it cut into their profits... so they hired cops to go beat the hell out of anyone who was collecting rain water.

Of course it took 2 weeks and Bechtel and the government were kicked out of power...

Ya think this kind of things can't happen in the US??
Collecting rainwater now illegal in many states as Big Government claims ownership over our water

How long before it becomes as bad as in Bolivia?
edit on 28-2-2012 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 04:56 PM
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Meh, we could've updated infrastructure 5 years ago instead of pushing our military might onto starving 3rd world countries in the name of the "War on Terror"

I suspect control of all major utilities is at hand. Gulf Power is hiking rates up pretty soon.. I can't complain too much, I know more and more demand for power is stressing the infrastructure, and on some occasions I see them replacing old power poles and doing other little things, but I also know a lot of these problems could've been handled a long time ago if the funds were allocated to the right places.

This further proves to those who don't believe corruption and control is all around them.

It's coming time to get my solar panel set up, set a filter up for the pump, and start relying more on nature. =]



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 04:57 PM
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You're under no obligation to use the water provided by these companies, it falls out of the sky for free.

However, if you want the water they provide because you don't want to go through the hassle of collecting it yourself, then you pay for it.

Not sure I am seeing what the thrust of your argument is. Besides, I thought round these parts people were convinced the "PTB" were trying to kill us all with flouride and other nastiness, so surely we shouldn;t be using their water anyway and collecting our own?

Which is it?



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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What happens if you boil rain water, does it work for the same as regular water? I just know rain water curls my hair but regular water doesn't. Wonder what's up with that?



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by stumason
You're under no obligation to use the water provided by these companies, it falls out of the sky for free.

However, if you want the water they provide because you don't want to go through the hassle of collecting it yourself, then you pay for it.

Not sure I am seeing what the thrust of your argument is. Besides, I thought round these parts people were convinced the "PTB" were trying to kill us all with flouride and other nastiness, so surely we shouldn;t be using their water anyway and collecting our own?

Which is it?


Not everybody has the means to collect rain water, unless they convince their high rise management to set up a storm water collection tank for them to drink from, I don't see it happening.

Some places it doesn't rain very much, so you'd practically die of dehydration before the next down pour.



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by Manhater
What happens if you boil rain water, does it work for the same as regular water? I just know rain water curls my hair but regular water doesn't. Wonder what's up with that?


Perhaps it's the minerals, and you can just boil rain water, or drink it by itself if you'd like.

Now if your collection method wasn't the most sanitary, I'd recommend a filter system, maybe 3 stage if you are really paranoid, then you could boil it.

But rain water should be good to drink straight from the sky depending on your collection method


Now, I dunno about drinking rain water in LA...



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


Ive always thought that any new housing should incorporate some sort of water catchment to supplement existing water infrastructure. How much rain water goes to waste down stormwater drains etc.
This would also drive growth in jobs as a whole new industry would evolve from it..



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by eXia7
 


Anyone with a window and a bucket could collect rain water, even in a high rise.

Anyhoo, you're kind of proving my point. No one is forcing anyone to live anywhere, especially places with little rainfall. Surely, the whole basis of society is that if you cannot do a job yourself, then you pay someone else to do it.

If you think water rates are too high, then collect your own to supplement the supply (or replace it altogether) or, if there isn't enough rainfall to do so and you still don't like the utility bills, then move.

Or are we now expecting to get treated, clean water, piped directly into our homes, for free now?



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by stumason
 



You're under no obligation to use the water provided by these companies, it falls out of the sky for free.

That's why I said the government/corporations would make this illegal as they have done in the past in other countries.

Only a matter of time.



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by stumason
 




Or are we now expecting to get treated, clean water, piped directly into our homes, for free now?


You pay taxes now don't you? It should be included in the taxes if you own a home.



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


I'd like to see them try and enforce such a thing though....

Illegal to collect water that falls out of the sky? A rediculous notion, although not surprising such a thing has been thought of!



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:07 PM
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Well...water costs tripling sucks...but we have to have water. Of course, this will only affect people in urban areas and those who are unable to have a well.



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


At this point, I think the situation changes between the UK and US, so I can only say how it is here, but our taxes go to local and national Government, not private corporations.

All of our water systems are operated by private firms, not one is Government run. Is that the case in the US, I honestly don't know? If so, then yes, I would have thought your local rates would pay for the utility....



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by stumason
reply to post by eXia7
 


Anyone with a window and a bucket could collect rain water, even in a high rise.

Anyhoo, you're kind of proving my point. No one is forcing anyone to live anywhere, especially places with little rainfall. Surely, the whole basis of society is that if you cannot do a job yourself, then you pay someone else to do it.

If you think water rates are too high, then collect your own to supplement the supply (or replace it altogether) or, if there isn't enough rainfall to do so and you still don't like the utility bills, then move.

Or are we now expecting to get treated, clean water, piped directly into our homes, for free now?



I think you are understanding this wrong, or have a very narrow view of the reality of "collecting water to drink"

It doesn't rain everywhere, all the time. Then depending on where you are, if you are AT your job making money, you obviously can't be outside catching rain water to drink.

Nobody is expecting water to be "free" as it's already pretty cheap per 1000 gallons you use, but what people do want is a fair chance at having clean water to drink, and provide for their family.

Again, not everybody has the tools, time, or know how to properly collect rainwater, but they are pigeon holed into relying on a service to meet their basic needs.



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by stumason
reply to post by Vitchilo
 


At this point, I think the situation changes between the UK and US, so I can only say how it is here, but our taxes go to local and national Government, not private corporations.

All of our water systems are operated by private firms, not one is Government run. Is that the case in the US, I honestly don't know? If so, then yes, I would have thought your local rates would pay for the utility....




We have a mixture, the town i live in has a county municipal water supplier. the town over where I work has a private buisness running it.

I will say that the private water company is a non profit organization, and they spend all their money back into the infrastructure. I have no problems with private water suppliers doing the job, as it has potential for people to gauge people, but basically the people who pay into the company are basically "share holders" so they have the right to speak against poor service.



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 

Dear Vitchilo,

Thanks for another interesting and important topic.


I went to your source and found that your voice and other's raised in protest have had some good effect.

Salt Lake City officials worked out a compromise with Miller and are now permitting him to use "their" rainwater, . . .
Utah isn't the only state with rainwater collection bans, either. Colorado and Washington also have rainwater collection restrictions that limit the free use of rainwater, but these restrictions vary among different areas of the states and legislators have passed some laws to help ease the restrictions.

In Colorado, two new laws were recently passed that exempt certain small-scale rainwater collection systems, like the kind people might install on their homes, from collection restrictions.

It sounds like your concerns have been at least partly addressed, keep up the good work.

With respect,
Charles1952



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by eXia7
 


Oh, I understand ok enough, but what I am saying is it isn't something you're being forced to pay for. It's like complaining that food costs money. You need it, for sure, but if you don't grow your own then you have to expect to pay someone else to do it and at the price they deem suitable. Again, if you live somewhere where this isn't possible, move or pay for your food. You have a choice.

Like I said, if you live somewhere where it doesn't rain enough to collect your own and you still wish to live there, then you have to rely on the water firm to pipe it in, which costs. If you don't wish to pay that much, then move somewhere where it is cheaper or where you can collect more...

As for being at work and unable to collect rainwater? You don't need to stand there and watch a bucket fill up! It is one of those things that kind of does it itself! With a simple set up, you could boil and then condense the vapour to get pure, clean drinking water, or use filters..



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by eXia7
 


That's kind of the way our firms run. They can make a profit, but we have an industry watchdog that sets prices and makes sure that a significant amount of the revenue is reinvested every year. Thames Water has been spending £1 Billion a year for the past several years upgrading London's Vistorian era water system and rates have remained fairly flat, thanks to OFWAT (the regulator)



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:21 PM
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Originally posted by stumason
reply to post by eXia7
 


Oh, I understand ok enough, but what I am saying is it isn't something you're being forced to pay for. It's like complaining that food costs money. You need it, for sure, but if you don't grow your own then you have to expect to pay someone else to do it and at the price they deem suitable. Again, if you live somewhere where this isn't possible, move or pay for your food. You have a choice.

Like I said, if you live somewhere where it doesn't rain enough to collect your own and you still wish to live there, then you have to rely on the water firm to pipe it in, which costs. If you don't wish to pay that much, then move somewhere where it is cheaper or where you can collect more...

As for being at work and unable to collect rainwater? You don't need to stand there and watch a bucket fill up! It is one of those things that kind of does it itself! With a simple set up, you could boil and then condense the vapour to get pure, clean drinking water, or use filters..



I'm not disagreeing with you, that's for sure. Despite some people's situations, it does all burn down to the fact that you don't have to pay them for the service, and you can do it yourself.

But that's the problem, people are just so reliant on the system they are so used to, they don't ever care to try and provide for themselves. They are comfortable turning on a water facet, taking a shower, and going out, not caring anything about the water that made journey to get to their home.

I personally am fascinated by water, it's something that I "cherish" so to say, it's just so awesome. I plan to try and off grid solution as soon as I can set funds aside to do it, Luckily I have a water pump, I just need to set up a solar panel system to run it so I know I'll at least have water on sunny days



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by eXia7
 


Likewise, I'm not trying to be difficult, just trying to say their are choices. But you hit the nail on the head by saying many people have become so accustomed that they could not think of an alternative...




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