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Distributing Krishna books at Salvation Army during community service: Right or wrong?

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posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 07:39 PM
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The young blogger in this clip admitted to getting community service for a license offense.
Although some of the narrative isn't that clear, it appears his charitable work brought him into contact with Hare Krishna devotees.
It also appears that he was converted to ISKCON beliefs, and helped devotees with websites and book/pamphlet distribution.

He assumed that distributing Krishna books was doing good and spreading the love of God.
Part of his community service was ringing a bell at the Salvation Army, where he started giving a Krishna book to everybody who donated.

However, soon he would get a visit from his community service director, who told him that he was distributing "cult literature". It doesn't seem to have stopped him either, because he said he'd gotten several complaints since then.

Can they actually stop him?
He is distributing recognized religious literature, no matter what people from another religion might think.

Does the director have any right to criticize or stop him?
I think the community service director is a bigot and should be fired.
Surely if you can do service for one religion, only bigotry would argue that it has to be the Christian religion.

They may be cults, but religious brainwashing is not illegal either way.




edit on 25-2-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 


Salvation Army is a Christian organization, so distributing non-Christian literature seems very rude.

On the other hand, I don't think a court should be ordering people to serve a Christian organization. That violates separation of church and state in my opinion. The court should make him pick up trash on the freeway or something like that.

edit on 25-2-2012 by cloudyday because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 08:27 PM
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Sorry, I haven't seen the vid yet. Was he doing mandatory community service? If so, slippery slope.


I know a few hard core Hari Krishnas who believe that they are Christians too, because Jesus was an Avatar, or, as the mood fits, the reincarnation of Krishna. I don't see how S.A. would have a legal leg to stand on.



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by cloudyday
 

Good points, and I can't really disagree.

Perhaps one could add that from the Krishna teachings it is not "rude", because they also view Christianity as God-consciousness, so from that position those distinctions don't exist.
I can see where this guy was coming from in his thinking, however I doubt it's something that would be really sanctioned higher in the Krishna movement.
But perhaps that also shouldn't matter - religious freedom is religious freedom.



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 08:45 PM
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reply to post by windword
 

He says something about some license offense (a term I don't don't know, and was hoping some US posters could perhaps explain).
I doubt it was anything too serious.

Strangely there are no court cases or legalities about this, which suggests that his director was not acting out of wholly professional interests when he basically told him to stop giving out free literature for another religion.


edit on 25-2-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 08:59 PM
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Originally posted by cloudyday
reply to post by halfoldman
 


Salvation Army is a Christian organization, so distributing non-Christian literature seems very rude.

On the other hand, I don't think a court should be ordering people to serve a Christian organization. That violates separation of church and state in my opinion. The court should make him pick up trash on the freeway or something like that.

edit on 25-2-2012 by cloudyday because: (no reason given)


I was going to say something similar but decided to just star you for it. You took the words out of my mouth. It's just bad to do community service for a christian organization and push paganism. Thats like going to a church on sunday and preaching about Shiva to the congregation. It's just wrong.



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 09:18 PM
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On the point of making offenders do something harsher and non-religious in community service: this is actually a bit of an issue here, because organized labor and unemployed people don't like the idea of free labor doing something they would do for a minimal wage. Courts are finding it difficult to place people into community service.

It also depends if there is trash on the freeway in this guy's town, and how harsh a sentence should be.

A lot of the charity organizations are religious, or have a religious character about them. That is problematic for cases like this.



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 09:21 PM
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Oh heck, just send him to the army.

Compared to ISKCON he'll finally have some hot showers, and he can grow his hair long and sleep late.


edit on 25-2-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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Originally posted by halfoldman
...
It also depends if there is trash on the freeway in this guy's town, and how harsh a sentence should be.

A lot of the charity organizations are religious, or have a religious character about them. That is problematic for cases like this.


There is never a shortage of trash where I live. I'll find him some trash to pick up.



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 06:35 AM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 
Don't know if it's right or wrong, but it sure is bloody funny.



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 


Does the director have any right to criticize or stop him?

In my opinion, no, they do not. Freedom of Religion does not mean just Christians. It means any and all Religious Faiths. Do you happen to know all of the Religious Symbols allowed on Military Graves?
Available Emblems of Belief for Placement on Government Headstones and Markers
Quote from site:

CFR 38.632 rule states that the following individuals may request a new emblem of belief for inscription on a headstone or marker: the decedent's next-of-kin (NOK), a person authorized in writing by the NOK, or a personal representative authorized in writing by the decedent.



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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I suspect that if Salvation Army has strict written guidelines for the behavior of their volunteers then they are fine. For example if their guidelines say that a volunteer should follow a script and this person deviated from that script it would not matter if he deviated to promote his religion or deviated to promote a political party or deviated to sell Amway.

The real crime is that a court forced a person to volunteer for a religious organization. How can government worry about Christmas trees on government property when they are providing free labor to religious organizations?

edit on 26-2-2012 by cloudyday because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 01:35 PM
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I think the Salvation Army didn't start as being socially accepted either.
At first they were pelted with projectiles, and their music set to popular tunes was considered "worldly".
en.wikipedia.org...
Not sure that's all true, but it's strange how some movements become almost "outside history", as if they've always been part of the very fabric of society.

Interesting how some hardcore mainstream religions can be pushed by the judicial system (especially in prisons), but others can not.

I'd say if they're standing in public it's not wrong, but on private Salvation Army ground it is wrong.
edit on 26-2-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by halfoldman
I think the Salvation Army didn't start as being socially accepted either.
At first they were pelted with projectiles, and their music set to popular tunes was considered "worldly".
en.wikipedia.org...
Not sure that's all true, but it's strange how some movements become almost "outside history", as if they've always been part of the very fabric of society.

Interesting how some hardcore mainstream religions can be pushed by the judicial system (especially in prisons), but others can not.

I'd say if they're standing in public it's not wrong, but on private Salvation Army ground it is wrong.
edit on 26-2-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)


I noticed in the wikipedia article that the U.S. issued a stamp in 1965 celebrating the 100th birthday of the Salvation Army. That seems unconstitutional for the U.S. Postal Service to give free advertising to a religious charity.

I think the Salvation Army is a good charity, but government involvement eventually leads to dependence and regulation.



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by cloudyday
 

I didn't even notice that.
Perhaps they could make a Krishna stamp to equal out the unfairness?



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