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The Temple of The Fox

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posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 07:34 PM
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Besides the 13 Towers of Chankillo, already mentioned sometimes here in ATS, there is another evidence of ancient astronomical science and its connection with the agriculture in pre-columbian America, “El Templo del Zorro” ( The Temple of the Fox).

If the search engine is right, this one haven't been discussed yet. It deserves a thread in ATS in my opinion. As is usual in my threads, most of the sources are not english, this time I was lucky and won't suffer to much with those anoying google translations.

The temple of the Fox seems to be the oldest obervatory in America, 4,200 years old.



The discovery in Peru of a 4,200-year-old temple and observatory pushes back estimates of the rise of an advanced culture in the Americas.

Archeologists working high in the Peruvian Andes have discovered the oldest known celestial observatory in the Americas — a 4,200-year-old structure marking the summer and winter solstices that is as old as the stone pillars of Stonehenge.

The observatory was built on the top of a 33-foot-tall pyramid with precise alignments and sightlines that provide an astronomical calendar for agriculture, archeologist Robert Benfer of the University of Missouri said.

The people who built the observatory — three millenniums before the emergence of the Incas — are a mystery, but they achieved a level of art and science that archeologists say they did not know existed in the region until at least 800 years later.



Among the most impressive finds was a massive clay sculpture — an ancient version of the modern frowning "sad face" icon flanked by two animals. The disk, protected from looters beneath thousands of years of dirt and debris, marked the position of the winter solstice.

"It’s really quite a shock to everyone … to see sculptures of that sophistication coming out of a building of that time period," said archeologist Richard L. Burger of Yale University’s Peabody Museum of Natural History, who was not involved in the discovery.

The find adds strong evidence to support the recent idea that a sophisticated civilization developed in South America in the pre-ceramic era, before the development of fired pottery sometime after 1500 BC.

Benfer’s discovery "pushes the envelope of civilization farther south and inland from the coast, and adds the important dimension of astronomy to these ancient folks’ way of life," said archeologist Michael Moseley of the University of Florida, a noted Peru expert.

The 20-acre site, called Buena Vista, is about 25 miles inland in the Rio Chillon Valley, just north of Lima. "It is on a totally barren, rock-covered hill looking down on a beautiful fertile valley," said Benfer, who presented the find last month in Puerto Rico at a meeting of the Society for American Archeology.

The site is remarkably well preserved, Benfer said, because it rains in the area only about once a year.

The name of the people who inhabited the region is unknown because writing did not emerge in the Americas for 2,000 more years. Some archeologists call them followers of the Kotosh religious tradition. Others call them late pre-ceramic cultures of the central coast. For brevity, most simply call them Andeans.

Benfer and archeologist Bernardino Ojeda of Peru’s National Agrarian University have been working at Buena Vista for four years. The site contains ruins dating from 10,000 years ago to well into the ceramic era in the first millennium BC.

The large pyramid and a temple occupy about 2 acres near the center of the site. Radiocarbon dating of cotton and burned twigs found in the temple’s offering pit place its use at about 2200 BC.

That is about 400 years after the first pyramid was built in Egypt and about the same time that the peoples who would become the Greeks were settling into the Mediterranean region.

The temple is built of rock that was covered with plaster and painted, although most of the white and red paint has long since flaked off.

Benfer calls it the Temple of the Fox because a drawing of a fox is carved inside a painted picture of another animal, probably a llama, beside each doorway. According to Andean myth, the fox taught people how to cultivate and irrigate plants.

As the team mapped out the site, Benfer observed that a person standing in the doorway of the temple and gazing through a small, flap-covered window behind the altar is aligned with a small head carved onto a notch of a distant hill. The line had an orientation of 114 degrees from true north, pointing southeast.

Benfer does not normally deal with archeoastronomy — the science of ancient astronomy — so he contacted a childhood friend, Larry Adkins of Tustin, and asked him what that angle signified.

Adkins, a physicist who is retired from Rockwell International and who now teaches astronomy at Cerritos College, told him 114 degrees pointed the way to sunrise on the Southern Hemisphere’s summer solstice, Dec. 21, the longest day of the year.

"That really got the ball rolling," Adkins said.

The summer solstice marks planting time, as the Rio Chillon begins its annual flooding, fed by melting ice higher up in the Andes. The flooding deposits fresh soil on the land, fertilizing the crops and eliminating the need for manure from domestic animals.



www.smithsonianmag.com...
terraeantiqvae.blogia.com...
articles.latimes.com...
edit on 25-2-2012 by Trueman because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 03:44 AM
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I forgot to mention something important to take in consideration. The weather in Lima is cloudy most of the year and is not usual to see the stars at night unless you go up to the mountains, towards the Andes. Anybody who knows Lima can confirm that.

That would be a clear evidence of how the weather changed since the days this observatory was used. The weather probably changed before we started using fossil fuel. Lima had to have a clear sky in other times in order to practice astronomical observations.



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 04:39 AM
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wow, nice find.

I love this sort of find that pushes the origin of cultures farther back than accepted archeology would like to admit.

They just have to push back another couple thousand of years and they start to be correct. I´d say at least 50 thousand years or so. Just to start.


S&F great!



posted on Feb, 26 2012 @ 06:34 AM
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reply to post by casenately
 


Thank you. I believe soon we will accept openly that the origin of ancient cultures can't be traced anymore on Earth and will need to consider foreign influence as a fact.



posted on Feb, 27 2012 @ 06:21 PM
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Very nice, thanks.

I like:

"According to Andean myth, the fox taught people how to cultivate and irrigate plants. "

Thought I'd add this nice link to the South American fox myth + cosmology:
journalofcosmology.com...


Mesoamerica and South America share common features in cosmology such as origin accounts. Further, the geographical breadth of these shared myths suggests considerable time depth. In South America, a mythical fox is linked to the moon, the sky, crops, marine foods, and irrigation. Review of ethnohistory and ethnography show that this mythical fox is restricted to Andean and tropical lowland South America, a range that still suggests considerable antiquity for the myth. Archaeological investigation offers a way of testing proposed antiquity. Four representations of foxes in the site of Buena Vista, Chillón Valley, Perú, date to between 2000 and 2200 BC. They are associated with temples on platform mounds, which show general astronomical orientations. Several temples have a complex set of astronomical alignments. A hierarchy of priests must have directed constructions of mounds, temples, and astronomical systems by the end of the third millennium BC in South America. The archaeological data are consistent with the cosmology of the Andes as known from ethnohistoric and ethnographic sources."


edit on 27-2-2012 by yampa because: (no reason given)



heh:


Fig. 1 Fox investigating excavations of his temple at the site of Buena Vista; he had not been seen in three previous seasons and showed up the day we found the Temple of the Fox and left, coincidentally, the day we finished covering it back up (image courtesy of Neil A. Duncan). Note crescent‐shaped eye.

edit on 27-2-2012 by yampa because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2012 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by casenately
wow, nice find.

I love this sort of find that pushes the origin of cultures farther back than accepted archeology would like to admit.

S&F great!


Aah, this discovery was by an archaeologist. It's accepted...does that now mean you feel it has to be wrong?




reply to post by casenately

Thank you. I believe soon we will accept openly that the origin of ancient cultures can't be traced anymore on Earth and will need to consider foreign influence as a fact.


Please explain


edit on 27/2/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 02:57 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Manytimes we found archeological founds don't match with history and it's chronology. That's when I start to think the so called "ancient astronauts" are the puzzle piece missing.

As I declared many times here, that was always accepted in the most natural way in many cultures. I believe one day we will recognize many of these ancient cultures as "branches" of an universal knowledge lost in time and/or hidden by an small group.




posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 03:00 AM
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reply to post by yampa
 


Thank you, I also find Andean cosmology fascinating. The constant reference to animals shows how much they were connected to the nature.



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Manytimes we found archeological founds don't match with history and it's chronology.


such as?



That's when I start to think the so called "ancient astronauts" are the puzzle piece missing.


...but that would be filling in a missing piece with - another missing piece


As I declared many times here, that was always accepted in the most natural way in many cultures.


Not sure what you mean here, that they accepted aliens or that they had a pantheon of gods?



I believe one day we will recognize many of these ancient cultures as "branches" of an universal knowledge lost in time and/or hidden by an small group.




Well you'd need a massively large group to control all the archaeologists, other scientists and looters involved in this so I think we can dismiss your 'small group', simply impossible.

'Universal knowledge', I think that might be man's innate cleverness



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 11:53 AM
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Originally posted by casenately
wow, nice find.

I love this sort of find that pushes the origin of cultures farther back than accepted archeology would like to admit.

Actually, the archaeologists believe cultures originated several million years ago -- but they weren't advanced, city-dwelling cultures. And there's some evidence that humans were in America some 20,000 years ago.


They just have to push back another couple thousand of years and they start to be correct. I´d say at least 50 thousand years or so. Just to start.

Even Australopithecus had organized cultures at a family and small group level, according to archaeologists.



posted on Feb, 28 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Trying to respond your questions.

2 great examples would be Tiwanaku and Nazca. Pointless to post pics or videos. Another example that makes me think that way is the Hatunrumiyoc (12 angles stone).

enperublog.com...

Regarding aliens, you have to excuse me. To go deeper would be out of topic.
edit on 28-2-2012 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 29 2012 @ 03:02 PM
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Originally posted by Trueman
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Trying to respond your questions.

2 great examples would be Tiwanaku and Nazca. Pointless to post pics or videos. Another example that makes me think that way is the Hatunrumiyoc (12 angles stone).



Sorry Trueman I must have missed this earlier

There is nothing there out of context, out of line with our historical chronology - except of course they were thousands of years behind the old world. Good masonry takes skill and time, the Killke and Incan probably had both. Nasca just requires imagination and moving (a lot of) small rocks

I would associate that with rosaries, pilgrimages and other historic actions
edit on 29/2/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 29 2012 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


About Nazca, I believe it took a lot of skills. I've been there many years ago, when there were less restrictions. I was so close that I touched the stones. I got to tell you, I was like
first, then I end like

edit on 29-2-2012 by Trueman because: (no reason given)




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