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Software to Reduce Cell Phone Radiation Emissions Which Cause Cancer To Improve Safety.

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posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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Originally posted by abecedarian

Originally posted by Anon77

Originally posted by Hellhound604
reply to post by Anon77
 


Sorry for your dad's RF burn. On an antenna, it just depends where you touch. The weird thing with RF burns is that you don't feel a thing, you just smell something burning. Afterwards it becomes extremely painful, lol....


Thanks, That's pretty much what he said too. I don't think he noticed it getting painful and the skin going red until and hour or so later. Had my share of electric shocks, but no RF burns yet... hmmm possibly I shouldn't temp fate.


I've yet to be seriously burned by anything but have experienced a bite, no marks left, from an old AT&T / Ericsson 882 TDMA 850 cabinet: the radio tried to key up while I was repairing a connector on a sector that was supposed to be control blocked... NOC tech brought down the wrong sector. And burned once on a GSM 1900 cabinet that a NOC tech tried bringing online before I was done- my hand was on the top of the bulkhead connector when that happened. I felt that one instantly and it left a small, annular burn in the palm of my hand which took about 7 weeks to heal. If you know the 7/16 DIN connector type, you know what the center conductor / pin looks like.

Any time I'm near anything if even remotely, possibly online, RF monitors are in use; when around radome or similar, it's either off (I power the cabinet down completely) or am in an RF suit; and in an RF suit around any UHF/VHF/FM/AM/TV antennas or anything whose power is questionable.


Yeah I've seen the 7/16 DIN connector. I'm not surprised that one hurt, all that energy over the small area of the center pin. I hope you gave the NOC tech some 'robust' advice about not bringing kit online whilst it was still being worked on?

I've used RF monitors and the kit is always powered down anyway, you know what health and safety rules are like these days!. I've seen the conductive RF suits but never worn one. They kind of reminded me of the chain-mail suits the electrical supergrid workers use for working on live 200 - 400kv lines from a helicopter. Apart from the chain-mail ones are about 50 times heavier and aren't provided with a strip of conductive tape to repair them if they rip!




posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:18 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
reply to post by abecedarian
 


You guys work with RF suits???? lol, in Africa we had no such luxuries, so a lot of youngsters were quite scared to go in front of antennas, or always kept their nuts covered, lol....

But seriously, what is a RF suit? I guess some coverall with metal fibers embedded?

Reminds me when I came to Europe, and saw workers with all sorts of protection, hearing protection, face masks, RF monitors, etc. I guess I now know one of the reasons why the average life-span is so much shorter in certain parts of the world.

edit on 24/2/2012 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)


Lol 'kept their nuts covered'


Yeah it's got metal fibers embedded in it. Take a look at this link. I've never used one myself but I've seen them being used. They come with a roll of conductive tape to fix rips and stuff.

Oh yeah, Health and safety has gone mad these days! 58 bits of paper and 19 people have to sign you off first or some amount of similar rubbish. 7 hours paperwork for a 20 minute job. Ridiculous. But as you say, in other parts of the world I'm not sure that safety is a word that's even used! Hopefully some day somebody will come up with a decent balance between safety and practicality.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 07:34 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
reply to post by abecedarian
 


You guys work with RF suits???? lol, in Africa we had no such luxuries, so a lot of youngsters were quite scared to go in front of antennas, or always kept their nuts covered, lol....

But seriously, what is a RF suit? I guess some coverall with metal fibers embedded?

Reminds me when I came to Europe, and saw workers with all sorts of protection, hearing protection, face masks, RF monitors, etc. I guess I now know one of the reasons why the average life-span is so much shorter in certain parts of the world.

edit on 24/2/2012 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)


The RF suit is a cotton or Nomex suit with stainless steel wire woven in. You get full head covering with a little wire mesh window to look out of (sort of like the window on a microwave oven), booties to cover your feet and gloves for your hands. It's quite hot inside, even when cold outside... and that's before getting in front of the antennae.


It's all about safety regulations now. I'm not supposed to climb more than 6' up a ladder without fall protection, have to have plenty of cold water and clean cups to last all day for 4 people minimum, have to have extra hard hats in case someone dumb shows up, and have to fill out a 4 different forms including a 6 page report of any and every potential safety and environmental issue I can envision at the site, down to what to do if I encounter a wasp nest, snake, endangered animal, weather or stubborn person that won't follow the safety rules.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 07:42 PM
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Originally posted by Anon77Yeah I've seen the 7/16 DIN connector. I'm not surprised that one hurt, all that energy over the small area of the center pin. I hope you gave the NOC tech some 'robust' advice about not bringing kit online whilst it was still being worked on?
Oh yeah! He got an piece of my mind, as did his supervisor, the project managers and safety officers. Suffice it to say I never had the enjoyment of speaking with that tech again.

I've used RF monitors and the kit is always powered down anyway, you know what health and safety rules are like these days!. I've seen the conductive RF suits but never worn one. They kind of reminded me of the chain-mail suits the electrical supergrid workers use for working on live 200 - 400kv lines from a helicopter. Apart from the chain-mail ones are about 50 times heavier and aren't provided with a strip of conductive tape to repair them if they rip!
OH YES! The paperwork...

The suits utility workers use are designed to direct that level of energy around the worker, mostly, so they can dis/embark the heli safely. I've seen some videos of them doing that, cleaning insulators and such, and it's fascinating that they have to discharge static from the helo to the line, and charge the heli with the line voltage from the line before they can transfer.
Like I say to guys I work with, as long as you only touch one wire at a time, and aren't grounded, you're okay.



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 06:54 AM
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reply to post by abecedarian
 


LOL, all your regulations. Makes me sort of glad that I practiced my black arts in a less civilized area, as paperwork is something I hate.





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