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Video of Apollo 17 Astronauts Singing and Dancing on the Moon (looks real-but...)

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posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 08:10 AM
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Okay, okay.... here we go. More footage from an Apollo mission to be reviewed and discussed. I see the date on the video is from 2008. I searched but didn't find any thread or mention of this event. Interesting. I thought they would be able to get hirer in the air when they moved. It appears the gravity there is well-there and very similar to earths-possibly.

Also, watch the dirt/dust at the feet. It seems to fall fastly (?) and no linger around... just saying.

Now, for the naysayers... you have to admit... if this was done on some "stage" of NASA's, they dam sure put one heck of a lot of thinking into it. Look at the size of the hill.



MODS. If this was done already and I missed it, Sorry.

Enjoy and looking forward to any thoughts.
edit on 2/24/2012 by anon72 because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 08:59 AM
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every time I see a video of the men on the moon surface it always looks like they are being pulled up by their backpacks. Looks like it is giving them a wedgy. I am sure it is just an optical illusion, but I keep looking for the string.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 


If you want analysis of something one would think a source would be kinda important.

You are conveying a poor understanding of kicked dust trajectory in zero atmosphere.

Why are threads like this not closed as trolling and one where it is stated as fictitious information closed here. It was my point that if I believed the 9,600 year old cities on the moon the thread would not have been closed.

Did you really want a discussion OP or a cheerleading section?



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 09:07 AM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 



I see you got your internet armchair biceps all pumped up. Happy Friday.

The source it the source. Of course I don't know HENCE why I put it up here. TO learn. Feel free to check out any of my space oriented threads.

I think the thread was nicely set up... both sides addressed. Sorry if you don't like it. Go cry somewhere else.

Have a good weekend.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 09:55 AM
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Originally posted by anon72
Okay, okay.... here we go. More footage from an Apollo mission to be reviewed and discussed. I see the date on the video is from 2008.





Hey anon72...

Some of us [who are older] have seen this video many, many times in the past. I guess 2008 is when it finally made it's Youtube debut.

As far as the moon dust. Very low or Zero atmosphere vs Low gravity?

The dust should still fall

No?



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Yes, of course it would fall.. but like on earth?

Again, I am not genius at the whole moon thing. I only ask as when I see some of these vids.. it just looks like it was as if it was shot on earth.

But, I was/am really hoping to get the nay-sayers in here to try an pick it apart....

But, after this one is done... I will have been edumacated.....


PS did you see my thread on the Pervuian cut rock? If we get to the moon and actually look at things etc. I will be freaked out if we find moon rocks (or any others) with the same indicaitons... hehehe.

Anyway, at the video site, the side videos also are interesting. The "falling on the Moon" etc. Of course, if NASA faked one...... they most likely faked more.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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I'm not sure what your issue with this video is. Notice how slowly they fall back to the surface when they hop. That is nothing at all like the gravity of Earth. The dust settles rapidly because there is no air for it to hang in. As for their silly behavior, had you been alive back in 1972 to watch hour after hour of their live transmissions, you would probably have begun to worry that they were beginning to experience the mostly highly visible incidence of "space madness."



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by anon72
 


I see what you're getting at but, The video in question is in such crappy condition we can't see clearly how exactly the dust falls nor clearly enough to tell how long exactly it takes for all of it to fall etc.

But I'm with you.
Question everything and think for yourself.

PEACE



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by anon72
 


The fact the dust doesn't linger tells me there was no atmosphere (to speak of) where these astronauts were.
For dust to linger, it would need an atmosphere to linger in.

The dust does seem to fall a bit more slowly than what we are used to seeing objects fall, but that could be attributed to the 1/6 gravity.

As for the singing: So these astronauts were acting like humans. While I think it would be normal for a person to be a bit giddy while walking on the Moon, I bet it also could be that NASA wanted these guys to put a little more "fun" into the mission, for PR purposes.


edit on 2/24/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 01:57 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
Question everything and think for yourself.

Every moon mission was closely monitored by the Soviets, including listening in on all the radio chatter going back and forth between NASA and the astronauts on the moon. If there were reason to doubt the authenticity of the moon missions, we'd have heard it from the Soviets at the time, and RT videos today.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by anon72
 


That was lovely! Thank you!
It is so good to know that they actually enjoyed the experience.
Doesn't it look like fun!?



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by anon72
 


OK, for starters this video clip is a compilation of different locations, different EVAs and different missions (the entire sequence from 0:07 to 0:25 is from Apollo 16, EVA-3). Also, the audio is not synch'ed. It is from different times and different missions. The singing is Gene Cernan & Jack Schmitt on Apollo 17. The "Dum-dee-dum-dum-dum" is Pete Conrad on Apollo 12. The "I like to skip along," "Not me, boy!" exchange is Charlie Duke & John Young (respectively) on Apollo 16.


Originally posted by anon72
I thought they would be able to get hirer in the air when they moved.


Higher in the WHAT?
To jump high, you need to bend at the knees, which is difficult to do in a pressure suit. Most of the time they didn't bother. However, they had to do it in order to make the 4-foot jump up to the first rung of the LM's ladder. In your clips, you can see that their knees are barely bending as they move across the ground. This brings us to your next comment...


It appears the gravity there is well-there and very similar to earths-possibly.


Not at all. If you tried that lope in Earth's gravity (or anything close to it), your knees would bend a lot more. Perhaps you are getting fooled by the fact that their limbs are moving at normal speed. Notice, however that they stay off the ground too long for it to be Earth's gravity.


Also, watch the dirt/dust at the feet. It seems to fall fastly (?) and no linger around... just saying.


The behavior of the dust is the single best visual cue that they are actually on the Moon.

The dust is very fine - like flour or portland cement. If you kick it on Earth, in an atmosphere, it billows and particles stay suspended in the air for several seconds. In a vacuum, with no air to support the particles, it falls quickly to the surface. Mind you, an inadvertant kick (such as when you or an astronaut lopes across the ground) only lifts the dust a few inches off the surface. Even on the Moon, gravity pulls it down at over 5 feet per second per second. In one second, a dropped object falls 32 inches; so particles just a few inches off the ground will land in a small fraction of a second.

The neat thing is, without air to slow it down, the dust in low gravity flies horizontally surprisingly far. You can see this in nearly every step the astronauts take. This behavior cannot be faked, even with modern CGI (a recent film tried to do it, but the result was not convincing).


Hope this helps.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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I can vaguely remember a video (from the 70's) on which an astronaut took a fall. My brain isn't sharp enough to recall on what mission that was, but now that I saw that famous clip of the astronauts going a bit nuts
, I remember that video. I am sure it must be on you-tube somewhere.

Don't know how you can fake that low-g fall on earth, but heck, what do I know? lol

btw. I see it was also on the Apollo 17 mission. (maybe they smuggled a bit of vodka with them? )

Ok, found it, here it is...


edit on 24/2/2012 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)

edit on 24/2/2012 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


A fall is documented in the Apollo 17 video archives, and it happened on almost every mission on way or another. It isn't as hard as one might think to get back up, the thrust of an arm to the surface only has to lift 1/6th of the downforce, but mobility would take anyone off guard and the gravity would make reactions awkward. But more so than the movements of the astronauts IMO it is the movements of the regolith powder that clinches these videos could not be faked in a movie studio then, and quite a computer generated graphic challenge today, the whole scene including the actors would have to be computer modeled down to the dust and that is a lot of memory burden.

I do novice 3D animation myself in over a half a dozen different programs and it would take me a year to make a minute video, with the software and processing power I have, which isn't anything near production studios, but still. Sometimes it isn't the processing power one has, but what can kill a good animation drive is a loose nut behind the wheel.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by Hellhound604
 


I do novice 3D animation myself in over a half a dozen different programs and it would take me a year to make a minute video, with the software and processing power I have, which isn't anything near production studios, but still. Sometimes it isn't the processing power one has, but what can kill a good animation drive is a loose nut behind the wheel.


hmmm, and we are expected to believe that they (NASA) had CGI in the 60's and 70's that could do all that??? I think getting a real man on the moon in that era, was more doable than faking it with CGI with computers from that era.


jra

posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 05:58 PM
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Originally posted by anon72
I thought they would be able to get hirer in the air when they moved. It appears the gravity there is well-there and very similar to earths-possibly.


Well they also didn't try to jump as high as they could. It would be a rather risky thing to do. With the PLSS on there back, there center of gravity is off. If you tried to jump really high, you'd have a tendency to tip over backwards. Which means you will end of landing on your life support system. This actually happened to one Apollo astronaut (I forget which mission now), so it's really not wise to go jumping around. It's just not a safe thing to do.

You also have to remember that just because the astronauts might weigh around 50lbs on the Moon, they still have a mass of about 300lbs to deal with.


Also, watch the dirt/dust at the feet. It seems to fall fastly (?) and no linger around... just saying.


That's one thing I point out to HB's as evidence of Apollo being real. On the Moon there is no atmosphere to keep the dust suspended like it would on Earth. Dust (or any object really), in a vacuum when kicked up, will tend to follow a parabolic like trajectory and simply fall back down to the ground. If the dust were to linger around, that would be a sign of air resistance and thus a hoax.
edit on 24-2-2012 by jra because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:34 PM
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The mass of the life support and an average 185 pound man on earth would be just shy of 400 pounds, in fact the weight of two astronauts on the lunar rover was calculated to be 800 earth pounds.

So 400 pounds on the moon is 66.4 earth pounds, a good percentage of that on your back. I have seen a lunar video that looks like an astronaut got nearly 4-feet of 'air', would blow away any wide receiver at the NFL combine next week for sure.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 08:53 PM
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Originally posted by jra
Well they also didn't try to jump as high as they could. It would be a rather risky thing to do. With the PLSS on there back, there center of gravity is off. If you tried to jump really high, you'd have a tendency to tip over backwards. Which means you will end of landing on your life support system. This actually happened to one Apollo astronaut (I forget which mission now), so it's really not wise to go jumping around. It's just not a safe thing to do.


"Their", not "there". Twice. Thank you.


You were referring to Charlie Duke on Apollo 16. IIRC, he fell four times. the first three were forward. John Young helped him up the first time, but he learned to do it on his own for the other two. The fourth fall was on his back while, he admitted, he was "goofing-off":


Charlie Duke, from his book "Moonwalker"
"[I] made a big push off the moon, getting about four feet high. 'Wow!', I exclaimed. But as I straightened up, the weight of my backpack pulled me over backward. Now I was coming down on my back. I tried to correct myself but couldn't, and as my heart filled with fear I fell the four feet, hitting hard - right on my backpack. Panic! The thought that I'd die raced across my mind. It was the only time in our whole lunar stay that I had a real moment of panic and thought I had killed myself. The suit and backpack weren't designed to support a four-foot fall. Had the backpack broken or the suit split open, I would have lost my air. A rapid decompression, or as one friend calls it, a high-altitude hiss-out, and I would have been dead instantly. Fortunately, everything held together."



posted on Feb, 25 2012 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by hanyak69
 





every time I see a video of the men on the moon surface it always looks like they are being pulled up by their backpacks. Looks like it is giving them a wedgy. I am sure it is just an optical illusion, but I keep looking for the string.

When they jummped the leg force had to be applied through the center of the mass. ie some point aft of the spine.
Otherwise it would have been a back flip.



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