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Space ball: UFO shocks Brazilians (VIDEO, PHOTOS)

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posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 05:58 AM
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reply to post by GLontra
 



They do carry small amounts of propellant for altitude or orientation maneuvers. This does look like a piece of space junk.




posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:01 AM
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Originally posted by judus
reply to post by GLontra
 



This



This one in Brazil was larger, probably more like this 769L tank.

cs.astrium.eads.net...



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:01 AM
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Originally posted by judus
Excuse my naivety.

But wouldn't something this size just burn up on re-entry ?


edit on 24-2-2012 by judus because: (no reason given)


Not if the object truly is what you're guessing it be. They're composite material meant to survive the re-entry to Earth. As to "why" they're falling... Anyone been keeping an eye on some of the more interesting objects up there?

edit on 24-2-2012 by SoulVisions because: grammer



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:02 AM
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reply to post by DAVID64
 



Look at the vid and see how easy the people move the object. It seems very light but not a dent on it and yet still created a crater.

Some smells fishy and its not my fish



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:02 AM
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lol its space debris.


Debunked.


this human made extra terrestrial satellite is now completely terrestrial again!



PS. They should not be touching that thing, it could be doused in cosmic radiation...... I saw a little girl touch it.. thats sad
edit on 2/24/2012 by truthinfact because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:03 AM
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Originally posted by SoulVisions
Thee writer/author of that article, above linked to Gawker, sounds as if he is a sophomore in high school with all of the balls "jokes."


LOL, yeah... Gawker uses humor in their articles, like Cracked.

Both decent sites to browse from time to time.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:05 AM
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Originally posted by SoulVisions

Originally posted by judus
Excuse my naivety.

But wouldn't something this size just burn up on re-entry ?


edit on 24-2-2012 by judus because: (no reason given)


Not if the object truly is what you're guessing it be. They're composite material meant to survive the re-entry to Earth. As to "why" they're falling... Anyone been keeping an eye on some of the more interesting objects up there?

edit on 24-2-2012 by SoulVisions because: grammer


But do you not have to re-entry at a certain angle thus minimizing the burn up. The locals also said that the sphere had liquid inside surely this would have boiled in some way of burnt if coming though the atmosphere.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:07 AM
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Originally posted by SoulVisions

Originally posted by judus
Excuse my naivety.

But wouldn't something this size just burn up on re-entry ?


edit on 24-2-2012 by judus because: (no reason given)


Not if the object truly is what you're guessing it be. They're composite material meant to survive the re-entry to Earth. As to "why" they're falling... Anyone been keeping an eye on some of the more interesting objects up there?

edit on 24-2-2012 by SoulVisions because: grammer


Perhaps some country's space program is conducting launches for analysis and rocket research. This is just speculation of course.
edit on 24-2-2012 by DaTroof because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:17 AM
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Besides the re-entry damage, I wonder that the impact in the ground would have made a big damage in that thing, if it was a piece of space debris that fell from more than 70 thousand meters...


But the thing looks almost intact...


It has fell in SOLID ground, and made a crater. It didn't fell in a water body...


Guessing by the fact that the sphere remains almost intact, don't you think it fell from a much smaller height than the 70 thousand meters of a satellite?



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:23 AM
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Looks like "Phobos grunt" satellite fuel tank to me..
edit on 2012.2.24 by amfis because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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If it's the propeller tank mentioned by DaTroof (and I think it is, even the size and weight are an almost perfect match), it's made of a titanium alloy called Ti6AlV, which has a melting point around 1600C (3000F). Pretty remarkable material, more info here:

asm.matweb.com...



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:25 AM
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Sure...survive re-entry...but what about the impact? It is curious that it looks intact structurally...it doesn't look dented.

What is this thing made of...titanium?

By the way...Hydrazine Bladder Tank is apparently made from EPDM...or rubber

This thing in the video sounds metalic in nature...



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:31 AM
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A few questions that come to mind when looking at this thing.

1, Why do they not show the impact crater on the video? An object this size striking the ground would create a large hole 'if it came from orbit'.

2, It looks like it is made of aluminium. Aluminum rarely survives re-entry, and even if it did it would be vapourized on impact... This thing does not have a single dent on it.

The most likely explanation is a hoax, the village idiot having a laugh at the at the expense of others
Or a nutter from the next town over built himself a catapult/cannon and launched this thing out of it. There is no chance this object came through the earth's atmosphere, nonsense.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:33 AM
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Some toughts about "terminal velocity":

Based on wind resistance, for example, the terminal velocity of a skydiver in a belly-to-earth (ie:face down) free-fall position is about 195 km/h (122 mph or 54 m/s).[2] This velocity is the asymptotic limiting value of the acceleration process, because the effective forces on the body balance each other more and more closely as the terminal velocity is approached. In this example, a speed of 50% of terminal velocity is reached after only about 3 seconds, while it takes 8 seconds to reach 90%, 15 seconds to reach 99% and so on.

Higher speeds can be attained if the skydiver pulls in his or her limbs (see also freeflying). In this case, the terminal velocity increases to about 320 km/h (200 mph or 90 m/s),[2] which is almost the terminal velocity of the Peregrine Falcon diving down on its prey.[3] The same terminal velocity is reached for a typical .30-06 bullet dropping downwards—when it is returning to earth having been fired upwards, or dropped from a tower—according to a 1920 U.S. Army Ordnance study.

source: en.wikipedia.org...



What do you think was the terminal velocity of this metallic sphere if it fell from a satellite?

200 km/h ?

300 km /h ?


Can a metallic ball hit the ground at 200 km/h and remain almost intact?



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:35 AM
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Originally posted by Atzil321
A few questions that come to mind when looking at this thing.

1, Why do they not show the impact crater on the video? An object this size striking the ground would create a large hole 'if it came from orbit'.

2, It looks like it is made of aluminium. Aluminum rarely survives re-entry, and even if it did it would be vapourized on impact... This thing does not have a single dent on it.

The most likely explanation is a hoax, the village idiot having a laugh at the at the expense of others
Or a nutter from the next town over built himself a catapult/cannon and launched this thing out of it. There is no chance this object came through the earth's atmosphere, nonsense.



It doesn't looks like a hoax.

People in small villages on Northern Brazil don't seem to have the habit of creating space-related hoaxes...



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:40 AM
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If this thing fell from a satellite, and impacted the ground at a terminal velocity of 200 km/h or more, don't you think the DEFORMATION of the sphere would be much greater than that?



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:41 AM
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Originally posted by Atzil321
A few questions that come to mind when looking at this thing.

1, Why do they not show the impact crater on the video? An object this size striking the ground would create a large hole 'if it came from orbit'.

2, It looks like it is made of aluminium. Aluminum rarely survives re-entry, and even if it did it would be vapourized on impact... This thing does not have a single dent on it.

The most likely explanation is a hoax, the village idiot having a laugh at the at the expense of others
Or a nutter from the next town over built himself a catapult/cannon and launched this thing out of it. There is no chance this object came through the earth's atmosphere, nonsense.


Actually, a hollow spherical object made of titanium would not make a large crater. When an object re-enters Earth's atmosphere from orbit velocity, it still travels "forward" much faster than it travels"downward". After passing through the various layers of atmosphere (the stages where heat damage are present), the object succumbs to gravity and eventually plummets faster "downward" than "forward". Upon reaching terminal velocity, the crater would be no larger if the object fell from space, or was dropped from a high enough building.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 06:44 AM
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From wiki

Debris at higher altitudes At higher altitudes, where atmospheric drag is less significant, orbital decay takes much longer. Slight atmospheric drag, lunar perturbations, and solar radiation pressure can gradually bring debris down to lower altitudes where it decays, but at very high altitudes this can take millennia.[52] Thus while these orbits are generally less used than LEO, and the problem onset is slower as a result, the numbers progress toward the critical threshold much more quickly. The issue is especially problematic in the valuable geostationary orbits (GEO), where satellites are often clustered over their primary ground "targets" and share the same orbital path. Orbital perturbations are significant in GEO, causing longitude drift of the spacecraft, and a precession of the orbit plane if no maneuvers are performed. Active satellites maintain their station via thrusters, but if they become inoperable they become a collision concern (as in the case of Telstar 401). There has been estimated to be one close (within 50 meters) approach per year.[53] On the upside, relative velocities in GEO are low, compared with those between objects in largely random low earth orbits. The impact velocities peak at about 1.5 kilometres per second (0.93 mi/s). This means that the debris field from such a collision is not the same as a LEO collision and does not pose the same sort of risks, at least over the short term. It would, however, almost certainly knock the satellite out of operation. Large-scale structures, like solar power satellites, would be almost certain to suffer major collisions over short periods of time.[54]


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 07:00 AM
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There might be damage to it, we are seeing photo's of a few sides of it, not all 360 degrees of it.

They are not showing the impact site either and "hard ground" is a bit vague.

To me it looks like a fuel bladder, and a lot like the pictures of the object that was talked about on the news a few months ago.



posted on Feb, 24 2012 @ 07:19 AM
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This was written about the one that fell in Namibia, but it also shows another one that fell in Brazil in 2008 and one that fell in Australia
www.universetoday.com...

news.discovery.com...


Exhibit A looks like a dusty "Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel" (or COPV for short) and although it did drop from orbit, it's simply an exotic-looking chunk of space junk.


COPVs have a variety of space applications, but they all provide the same function -- they store gases under pressure in a space environment.

What's more, to maintain the high pressure within the COPV, they are made of very tough material, often wrapped in carbon fiber or Kevlar. This is why COPVs can remain intact on reentry.




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