Survivalist Super Food: Traditional Korean Kimchi recipe

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posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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This is not just a recipe, but a DIY for making a SUPER food that provides a huge tasty payoff for all your hard work, and if the SHTF then you will be able to provide a valuable, sustainable health product to your community. Its easy to raise nappa, onions, and chiles yourself as well.

Oma's Traditional Family Korean Kimchi:

2 large (3 med) Nappa cabbages, sliced into 2" chunks
1 large peeled daikon radish (1/2 grated fine, 1/2 juilenned)
1 large peeled carrot, grated (optional)
4-6 large red salad radishes (optional)
2 tsp fresh grated ginger
2 tsp Korean anchovy sauce (or viet nouc mam works ok)
8-10 green onion tops, cut lengthwise then into 2" pieces
6 cloves garlic crushed
10 Tb total (assorted coarse and fine, hot and mild) Korean roasted Chili powder
salt (iodized or fine sea salt)
flour and water

It first helps to have one large 5 gallon food grade bucket, as well as several 1/2-1 gal glass jars with lids. Start by cutting all cabbage into 2" segments (DONT wash yet, it get rinsed later) then place a layer down in your bucket (about 1-2" thick) then salt generously, keep layering until all cabbage is down and well salted. Turn cabbage every 30 minutes for at least 2 but preferably 3 hrs, until cabbage has let loose of some of its water and has turned limp and darker in color. Rinse all of the cabbage well in a strainer, let drain well, then return to rinsed bucket, add garlic, ginger, onions, carrot, chili powder, and fish sauce. In a small sauce pan bring about 1-2 c water to a boil then slowly add 1Tb flour to make a paste, add this to the bucket, let cool for a minute, then mix all ingredients well with your (gloved) hands, then transfer contents to glass jars, leaving at least 2-3" on top for gas expansion (it can explode!). Cover jars loosely with plastic wrap and place in a cool dark place for 3-6 days. Check contents with a wooden spoon after the 2nd day and every day after that, pressing contents down into accumulated liquids releasing gasses (bubbles) and after about 6 days (will have fermented smell and making many bubbles) transfer to fridge and put lids on jars (loosely for first few days) and let sit another 1-2 weeks until ready to eat. Keeps almost INDEFINITELY.

You can find several different types of uniquely Asian radishes for use with this, as well as many different types of smoked chili powders (the bigger the variety of chilis you use the deeper the flavor gets) and the type of fish sauce can make a difference as well (some use shrimp paste).

Also you can substitute the korean chili powders with mexican ones, add cilantro and jalepenos and the juice along with some lime, make Mexi-chi, its AWESOME! Great for tacos, adds a crunch and nice spicy sour bite.




posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 11:42 PM
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reply to post by Aliquandro
 


Thank you so much for the recipe!
I especially like the Mexican Kimchee idea. I'll definitely be making some soon!



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by Aliquandro
 


Nice recipe. I have been making kimchi for a number of years. It’s such a versatile food. I usually leave out the fish paste since. I am too lazy to make a 45 min treck to the Asian market to get it. I also make it in a single large batch in a sauerkraut crock.

I can’t wait to try your recipe. I think it’s better than mine.

For those who have never had Kimchee, it is wonderful. If you like sauerkraut you will LOVE kimchi

Nice info post



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by Aliquandro
 


S & F!

The last time I made my own kimchee was in middle school. I've gotten lazy and just buy it now. After reading your recipe I'm gonna start making some this weekend!

The stuff you buy just isn't the same, seems too processed or something.

Thanks again for the recipe and the great idea for a project with the kid!



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 11:59 PM
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Ramen Noodles sound a lot simpler haha



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 12:15 AM
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Dude, you are messing with my head. Kimchi, a General once told me, is an acquired taste. I believe it to be true.

Once acquired, however, it NEVER leaves.

Thanks for the recipes.


An aside: Kimchi has also been scientifically associated with sexual health. Not as in aphrodisiac, mind you, but as in keeping the system, especially female, "clean."



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by The GUT
 


I had some tonight, i typically crave it
And the feminine cleanliness theory is definitely true :p

glad everybody likes, hope it turns out well and always love to hear new tricks!



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 02:36 AM
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reply to post by Aliquandro
 


I absolutely loves me some Kimchi.

Other than Coleslaw, it is the only cabbage I eat.

Thanks for the recipe! Gotta try it out.

S&F!



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by Aliquandro
 


Yes but the jars must remain in tact and not broken...thats the only kicker
Fermented vegetable products are an awesome super food. The most important aspect of making them at home is to avoid high sodium. The natural bacteria and modest sodium content will be enough to preserve them.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 11:04 PM
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Originally posted by RightWingAvenger
reply to post by Aliquandro
 


Yes but the jars must remain in tact and not broken...thats the only kicker
Fermented vegetable products are an awesome super food. The most important aspect of making them at home is to avoid high sodium. The natural bacteria and modest sodium content will be enough to preserve them.


Yes that can be a trick, and people always smell when they make a mistake.
One trick I learned is get your 1 gal glass jars from bars and restaurants. When storing it in the fridge, use Seranwrap, then very loosely on top of that screw on your lid, but it always allows for gasses to escape. If you were clever you could mount a winemakers gas valve to the lid somehow and never have that problem ($ making idea folks).

I think I may try a Hungarian style of Kimchi, just not sure what I'd use it on? Hmm wait a second, how about a spicy Indian Curry Kimchi? actually no better yet, Spicy Red Thai Curry!! Use fermented shrimp paste and some fresh tender lemongrass shoots, also add bamboo shoots for some crunch.

I'll let you know how it turns out



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by Aliquandro
 


I will definitely give this recipe a try!
My first experience of eating kimchi was not a pleasurable one. I traveled from Canada to Korea to visit my daughter who was teaching English in Korea and experience what I would call a sad attempt by the airline to have us try the foods of our new experience we were about to have once in Korea.
Once in Korea however I fell in love with the dish and will give this recipe a try! Thanks for posting!!





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