Tauristercus Thread On Silver Bullion - List Of Silver Containing Everyday Items

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posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 05:59 AM
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Hi All,

Some of you will have read a thread by member tauristercus titled Dummies Guide to EASY silver bullion refining at home as a long term precious metal investment found HERE.

I wanted to post a thread in an attempt to pull our resources together for those of us who found that thread very, very informative.

When i saw the thread title, i initially thought, "i bet its not as easy as the title says", yet to my surprise it was actually one of the best threads and worth-while threads i have ever read on ATS so tauristercus needs to be congratulated.

Were all aware that times are difficult, and anything that is cheap and affordable to boost your income is very much appreciated, well it is by me anyways...so what i was thinking was...

With the large community we have here, can we pull our resources together and contribute to that thread by listing items in this thread that contain silver?

I have browsed the net for a while and the main thing is obviously coins, for the UK its mainly coins pre-1947...but these aren't cheap to come by. I was hoping we could post other ideas for cheaper things that may contain silver, that aren't necessarily collectors items.

I know its a challenge, and maybe tauristercus can help out a bit, but I'm sure there are many members on here who have a chemical knowledge that can maybe provide some input too.

I for one will definitely be trying out tauristercus methods and i will also be scouring the country at car boot sales for old cheap silver items to melt down.

Any input from you all would go a long way...




posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 06:20 AM
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Some sources of easily obtained silver:

1. Old, broken, unused or unwanted silver jewelry
2. Garage sales, car boot sales, jumble sales for any silver containing items
3. Thrift shops and good will stores for any silver containing items
4. Antique shops - not the expensive upmarket ones but the ones selling "junk" stuff
5. eBay is an excellent place to obtain old and out of circulation coins. Many pre 1965 coins have quite high silver contents e.g. the 1965 round Australian 50 cent coin contains 80% silver, Australian sixpences from the 40's, 50's and 60's contain 50% silver, Australian threepences "thruppence" also are a good source of silver.
Many other "older" coins from other countries also can be a good source of easy silver.
6. Estate sales
7. Silver is also used widely in many electronics e.g. computer motherboards. However only in very small quantities and you'd need a heck of a lot of boards.

Good luck, all !
edit on 20/2/12 by tauristercus because: (no reason given)
edit on 20/2/12 by tauristercus because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 06:22 AM
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car boot sales/jumble sales/small charity shops as the larger ones send everything to sorting centres so anything of value is generally picked up and wander up and down the local flea markets for stuff like cutlery



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 07:11 AM
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Me too wants to congratulate the tauristercus! Best thread in a while...

I jumped onto our local auction site, and skimmed eBay, for quite a while after I've read the silver-refining thread - now my question is - How much silver is extract-able from silver plated items? It seems that old crockery might be a cheap option of obtaining silver. I have found that coins pre-1969 from my country does contain up to 50% silver, but even a used and damaged coin go for more than the spot price per ounce!

.../respect
edit on 20/2/12 by PadawanGandalf because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by PadawanGandalf
Me too wants to congratulate the tauristercus! Best thread in a while...

I jumped onto our local auction site, and skimmed eBay, for quite a while after I've read the silver-refining thread - now my question is - How much silver is extract-able from silver plated items? It seems that old crockery might be a cheap option of obtaining silver. I have found that coins pre-1969 from my country does contain up to 50% silver, but even a used and damaged coin go for more than the spot price per ounce!

.../respect
edit on 20/2/12 by PadawanGandalf because: (no reason given)

Congrats on your initiative to research. you along others are finding out that if there is a use there is a market and with coins and other materials containing silver and gold there is a set or going rate. So it is not common to get silver or gold bearing items at a "steal".
Also, I think many here will find that the process of silver extraction using the nitric acid method is easy enough BUT the work, chemical hazards, melting/flame hazards, fume hazards, material costs (acid, propane/mapp gas or oxy acet. torch set and fuel) will make their cost to profit margin less than anticipated.
At this moment silver spot market is $33.47 per ounce. US pre 1965 silver coin spot is $26.00 for a Morgan or Peace dollar (slightly less than an ounce). Us pre '65s are 90% silver 10% copper.
My experience with ebay is you will pay greater than current spot for coins especially after including shipping cost.
Now, personally i am waiting to hear about the gold extraction technique mentioned in the other post. Gold is currently $1731.90 per ounce and I have a steady source of computer scrap at my disposal

edit on 20-2-2012 by grubblesnert because: i initially hit reply with out typing anything.......ughh



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 07:23 AM
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Thanks for starting this thread, this is a perfect follow up to that other thread mentioned above.

I was wanting to ask though, how do you know or ensure that the silver content in some old piece of "junk" is worth more than the market value of the item itself before you melt it down? i.e. is there more than 10 cents worth of silver in an old american dime, or if the dime is say worth 2 bucks due to its year, etc? I guess i need to buy a coin catalog too...



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 07:46 AM
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reply to post by IronDogg
 
Google "pricing guide" or "spot market US silver coins" and you'll have plenty of info at your disposal

Remember google is your friend

Also wanted to add that the spot market price is not what a "we buy silver coins" professional buyers will pay you
That will substancially less say 50-75% of the going spot rate, depending or how many and what type coins you offer
edit on 20-2-2012 by grubblesnert because: wanted to add.........
edit on 20-2-2012 by grubblesnert because: spellin'



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 08:05 AM
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What i was thinking was to find and melt as much silver as i could but not sell it immediately. My plan, once i perfect the method and ensure safety is to obtain as much as possible and then buy a mold similar to this and then cast the silver into bars. Even if it took me 10 years of melting and extracting silver for 1 bar, i think in the long run its best to save it. Keep it secure, you never know when you might need it.

If you happen to get to your death bed with this world still in some civilized shape, the silver bars could be passed down your family as inheritance. If on the other hand there is a real SHTF scenario, then you still have your silver bars.

This is what i plan on doing anyways but first off its going to be a hard fight trying to find that elusive, cheap silver...



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:18 AM
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Look through your change people. I have been pulling pre 1965 quarters and dimes for some time now for this reason. You would be surprised at how many are still in circulation. Here is a link explaining what has silver and what doesn't, coin wisw anyway. Good thread to follow up the other one. Thanks.

www.coinsite.com...
edit on 20/2/12 by usmc0311 because: added content.



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by jrmcleod
 


It's absolutely a waste of time...You can't debunk me on this...How much nitric acid does it take to turn your junk silver into pure silver? How many hours of labor does it take to refine one silver bar?

Do you think Goodwill stores sell sterling/plated silver cheaper than the actually melt value? They don't...

The only way you can make money at this is you obtain the old coins/silverwares for free or next to nothing. Thrift stores no longer give the stuff away.

Another flaw is dealing with nitric acid. It has to be used with extreme caution and one little accident could cause permanent damage for life. It's better to get spot value for the silver than take all the time and risk to refine it.

The only way the silver utopia could do any good is if people would strike their own currrency. But everybdoy knows Americans are too fat and apathetic do anything revolutionary. GIve it up.



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by RightWingAvenger
 


Nitric acid in the UK... 45 litres = 91.96 GBP
www.reagent.co.uk...

Smetling 30 GBP up to 9kg at london goldsmiths company
www.thegoldsmiths.co.uk...
Who will also assay your metal and hallmark it..

current value for 1kg of silver = 680.32 (at time of posting) GBP
silverprice.org...

now re-do your math please



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 07:33 PM
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on a side note ive heard silver has remarkable medical benefits and kills bacteria by contact so its also handy to have around

side note it doesnt discriminate between good healthy bacteria and bad bacteria either so dont just go rubbing and bathing in it either



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 06:59 AM
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Cell phones and old computers.
Not for silver, but for gold. Most cell phones have it, and computers have it as the pins in the boards.
Next time you see a bunch of old outdated computers in a school dumpster.. grab them all out of there.
edit on 21-2-2012 by GogoVicMorrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 07:04 AM
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reply to post by RightWingAvenger
 


I find a lot of sterling silver at estate sales. I don't know why anyone here is talking about refining it. Sterling silver 92.5% pure. All you have to do is use a sterling silver weight conversion/melt value calculator.

Like here: Sterling Silver Calculator



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


go for pre 1990 computers as the gold plating was about 100 times thicker than it is now and a mobile phone/modern computer probably wont have enough gold to make it worth while but some of the rare earths may be worth it but you'll probably need industrial gear to recover them and probably a truck full of stuff will probably make a few kilo's of earths and a few grams of gold



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 08:36 AM
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I frequent the thrift shops etc and have found several collectible baby spoons that are sterling silver. I also wanted to ask OP if that refining process works on silver plated items or if silver plated items are even worth saving. I also believe it is illegal to destroy currency so be wary. Thanks for all the info.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 08:56 AM
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reply to post by quest4info
 


Yeah.. it is illegal to destroy currency, plus I don't see why anyone would want to. People are more likely to buy/trade for metal in a recognizable form and it is already separated out into small denominations.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 09:29 AM
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Thought i'd respond to some of the members here as to why i want to refine silver/gold.

1. I'd rather have 99% pure silver, not 92.5% or 80%
2. I want to melt it into bars (eventually)
3. I want to keep it as a "safe-guard" that can be passed onto my children if need be.

I would rather have it at 99% purity which i will then send to London to have it Hallmarked and authenticated/certified. Whats the point in having 200 silver spoons or plates laying around when it can be in one lump of 99% purity?

Just to clarify, its not actually illegal to melt old US silver coins, its only illegal to melt nickels and dimes because their face value is less than the metal value.

Source
edit on 21/2/12 by jrmcleod because: (no reason given)
edit on 21/2/12 by jrmcleod because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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As I'm from the states, I rarely see coins in circulation that's not ours or Canadas...

1942 - 1945 Silver Jefferson Nickel
35% silver, 56% copper, 9% manganese

1916 - 1945 Mercury Silver Dime
90% silver, 10% copper

1946 - 1964 Silver Roosevelt Dime
90% silver, 10% copper

1916 - 1930 Standing Liberty Silver Quarter
90% silver, 10% copper

1932 - 1964 Silver Quarter
90% silver, 10% copper

1916 - 1947 Silver Walking Liberty Half Dollar
90% silver, 10% copper

1948 - 1963 Silver Franklin Half Dollar
90% silver, 10% copper

1964 Silver Kennedy Half Dollar
90% silver, 10% copper

1965 - 1970 Silver Kennedy Half Dollar
40% silver, 60% copper

1878 - 1921 Silver Morgan Dollar
90% silver, 10% copper

1921 - 1935 Silver Peace Dollar
90% silver, 10% copper

1971-1974, 1976 Silver Eisenhower Dollar
40% silver, 60% copper


Canadian coins

1920-1967 Dime
80% silver, 20% copper

1967-1968 Dime (50% silver)

1920-1967 Quarter
80% silver, 20% copper

1967-1968 Quarter (50% silver)

1920-1967 Half Dollar
80% silver, 20% copper

1935-1967 Dollar
80% silver, 20% copper

The Canadian Mint issued two compositions of the dime and quarter in 1967. The standard 80% silver/20% copper variety and the 50% silver/50% copper type. In mid-year 1968, they changed the quarter and dime again from 50% silver/50% copper to a 99% nickel composition


edit on 21-2-2012 by Athin because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by jrmcleod
 


Why though? It doesn't make that much sense.
The value isn't any more and actually becomes less if you do that. Bars are pointless and clunky.
There is no point whatsoever in melting them into .999 the silver wont be worth anymore. People don't pay less because it's sterling. They adjust the price slightly and pay what it's worth. Also you are going to end up having giant bars that are home made that no one trusts because they are obviously home made.

If you came up to me with a bag of coins I would buy them on the spot, if you came up with an unmarked home made bar, I would probably pass and not trust it.





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