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Intolerable Acts – Against America

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posted on Feb, 17 2012 @ 12:01 PM
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Awesome thread, and even greater responses...

But the question remains...

When will we start to take it back?

It's disgusting to see this take place.
But every person I see around me still keeps the same routine.
Apparently the public doesn't see this as destructive, I know some that agree with it!

I honestly feel that, in my opinion:
Until we shut down the media...
Until we shut off our television programming...
Until the average American sees what is going on...

We won't have an ice cube's chance in hell to start a real change.








posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 11:11 AM
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reply to post by havok
 



But the question remains...

When will we start to take it back?

Virginia just passed a law that prohibits its citizens from assisting the US military in detaining US citizens. This is the kind of thing I hope to see more of until (and if) congress revises or repeals NDAA.

Way to go, Virginia!


On Tuesday, February 14th, the Virginia House of Delegates voted in favor of House Bill 1160 (HB1160). The final vote was 96-4.

The legislative goal of HB1160 is to codify in Virginia law noncompliance with what many are referring to as the “kidnapping provisions” of section 1021 and 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act of 2012 (NDAA). The official summary of 1160:

“A BILL to prevent any agency, political subdivision, employee, or member of the military of Virginia from assisting an agency of the armed forces of the United States in the conduct of the investigation, prosecution, or detention of a citizen in violation of the United States Constitution, the Constitution of Virginia, or any Virginia law or regulation.”

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edit on 18-2-2012 by seabag because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 04:45 PM
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We need a national proposition process like in California and many other states. These propositions enable the people to take back government from the corrupt system of campaign finance and backdoor lobbyist deals that have turn our congress into the minions of the filthy rich.

The CA proposition process has done a good job of putting more control into the hands of the people.



posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


Some people might view the Virginia law as a new doorway for a Fed "takeover" in some situations.

Because "locals" won't be cooperating with a Fed agency, the Feds might simply do it all themselves.

Then what ?

Or did I misunderstand the context and spirit of that new law ?



posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by poet1b

We need a national proposition process like in California and many other states. These propositions enable the people to take back government from the corrupt system of campaign finance and backdoor lobbyist deals that have turn our congress into the minions of the filthy rich.

The CA proposition process has done a good job of putting more control into the hands of the people.



I agree with this 100%


We need to press the legislatures to stop adding unrelated items to the laws also.

Too many laws have passed because the main theme was one that was a "lock" to pass.

Many secondary insertions had no business being part of the original bills.

Keep it simple.

But then again, they know that and that's why we see the deceptive practices.



posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 06:04 PM
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Originally posted by lonegurkha


So how does a person qualify as a potential domestic terrorist? Based on the training I have attended, here are characteristics that qualify:

• Expressions of libertarian philosophies (statements, bumper stickers)
• Second Amendment-oriented views (NRA or gun club membership, holding a CCW permit)
• Survivalist literature (fictional books such as “Patriots” and “One Second After” are mentioned by name)
• Self-sufficiency (stockpiling food, ammo, hand tools, medical supplies)
• Fear of economic collapse (buying gold and barter items)
• Religious views concerning the book of Revelation (apocalypse, anti-Christ)
• Expressed fears of Big Brother or big government
• Homeschooling
• Declarations of Constitutional rights and civil liberties
• Belief in a New World Order conspiracy


Well lets see. Libertarian philosophy...check
second amendment views...Check
Survivalist literature...check
Self-sufficiency....check
fear of economic collapse...check
book of revelation...check
fears of big brother....check
homeschooling....no kids
declarations of rights and civil liberties....check
New world order...check

Well that's all but one. Come and get me. (holds out hands for the cuffs and opens shirt for the tazering to begin)

Like your avatar.S&F good post


Your doomed lonegurkha......


Scary times.......



posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by xuenchen
reply to post by seabag
 


Some people might view the Virginia law as a new doorway for a Fed "takeover" in some situations.

Because "locals" won't be cooperating with a Fed agency, the Feds might simply do it all themselves.

Then what ?

Or did I misunderstand the context and spirit of that new law ?


I think the spirit of the law is “if you won’t uphold the constitution then we, as a state, will.”

At least that’s how I read it…I could be wrong.

The FED is trying to require the states to cooperate with an unconstitutional law and Viginia appears to have said, "UHHHH....NO!" Arizona tried to enforce federal immigration law and they got sued by the FED. Virginia is trying to defend the 6th ammndment of the constitution here...we'll see how the FED reacts. Crazy times when the FED goes after states trying to do the right thing.
edit on 18-2-2012 by seabag because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


I'd just like to say Welcome to the other "terrorist" who are arriving late to the game.
I've been a "terrorist" for quite a few years now, on my stance of questioning the events of 911.
There,s a ID card and "secret handshake" that will be forwarded to you at a later date.



posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 06:50 PM
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Anybody know how many names are currently on the terrorist watch list?

Google gave me many credible, but conflicting, results. Wikipedia had the current number at 400,000. But USA today said it hit 1 million people back in 2009, while other credible sources had the number of people on the list at 1 million back in 2008.


Seems like a hell of a way to spend tax dollars we cannot afford to research, screen, and study all 8 billion people on the planet to know who can be permitted aboard an aircraft, and who cannot.



posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by Tw0Sides
reply to post by seabag
 


I'd just like to say Welcome to the other "terrorist" who are arriving late to the game.
I've been a "terrorist" for quite a few years now, on my stance of questioning the events of 911.
There,s a ID card and "secret handshake" that will be forwarded to you at a later date.


Since being a veteran qualifies me, I’ve been on the list since I left active service in 2004.


Hey, we’re in good company. Based on the criteria laid out by the DHS I’d say the majority of Americans qualify!

I haven’t been issued a special ID and no one has taught me the ‘secret handshake’ yet but I’m a full-fledged member for sure!



posted on Feb, 18 2012 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by ILikeStars
 



Anybody know how many names are currently on the terrorist watch list? Google gave me many credible, but conflicting, results. Wikipedia had the current number at 400,000. But USA today said it hit 1 million people back in 2009, while other credible sources had the number of people on the list at 1 million back in 2008.


I think that list contains the jihadists rather than the new ‘domestic terrorists’. They can’t publish those names for fear of a defamation lawsuit.



Seems like a hell of a way to spend tax dollars we cannot afford to research, screen, and study all 8 billion people on the planet to know who can be permitted aboard an aircraft, and who cannot.


I understand why they do it but I have to seriously question the criteria!



So how does a person qualify as a potential domestic terrorist? Based on the training I have attended, here are characteristics that qualify:

• Expressions of libertarian philosophies (statements, bumper stickers)
• Second Amendment-oriented views (NRA or gun club membership, holding a CCW permit)
• Survivalist literature (fictional books such as “Patriots” and “One Second After” are mentioned by name)
• Self-sufficiency (stockpiling food, ammo, hand tools, medical supplies)
• Fear of economic collapse (buying gold and barter items)
• Religious views concerning the book of Revelation (apocalypse, anti-Christ)
• Expressed fears of Big Brother or big government
• Homeschooling
• Declarations of Constitutional rights and civil liberties
• Belief in a New World Order conspiracy

OP



posted on Feb, 19 2012 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by sonnny1
 


Thanks for the reply LMAO. I'm getting ready to run for the bunker now.LOL Love the avatar sonnny1.

edit on 2/19/2012 by lonegurkha because: (no reason given)



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