It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Germany suggesting regime change in Greece

page: 1
14
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 08:51 AM
link   
Greek rhetoric turns into battle of wills

The battle of wills between Athens and its eurozone lenders has intensified, with Greece's finance minister accusing "forces in Europe" of pushing his country out of the euro while his German counterpart suggested postponing Greek elections and installing a new government without political parties.


Germany is basically talking about forced REGIME CHANGE in Greece... that is a declaration of war.



edit on 16-2-2012 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 08:54 AM
link   
They dont even feel the need to be secretive about it anymore, now they openly talk about overthrowing sovereign nations.

The people of the World really need to take our countries back.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:01 AM
link   
What the hell?

I know it's just one teensy german finance minister who said it out loud, but the fact that it was said at all is disgusting.

How about we install new governments in a few other countries and what's more - let me pick them?



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:13 AM
link   
How about letting Greece elect a democratic government in the first place. Changing one imposed puppet for another means absolutely nothing.

Voteing from a choice of puppets will not alter much but at least they should get to choose what ineffectual fop imprisons them in debt at the behest of thieving bankers and corrupt politicians who now believe bypassing the ballot box is acceptable practice.

Of course there is another choice. Take to the streets, choose as a people to bypass the ballot box their leaders seem to have little respect for and ttTell the Thieves what they can do with their debt and offer of debt slavery.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:22 AM
link   
reply to post by colin42
 


The Greeks dug their own hole. The debt stems from the countless entitlements. It's a shining example of why "nanny states" don't work.

People can, and have, taken to the streets. Shouting blame, and pointing fingers, and of course acting violently. It was predictable that riots would start.

A little individual responsibility, and hard work would have avoided this mess.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:27 AM
link   
reply to post by Heros_son
 
Is that so?

All I see is individuals at the bottom being expected to take on the responsibility and those at the top still signing cheques they cant pay for.

Too right they are in the streets. Too right they are causing violence and lets hope many more in many other countries do when it is our turn to stand up or bend over.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:32 AM
link   
reply to post by Heros_son
 




The Greeks dug their own hole.

And by that you mean the sellout government right?


The debt stems from the countless entitlements.

Which they work for at the rate of 42 hres a week, 20% more than Americans and more so than the rest of Europe.


It's a shining example of why "nanny states" don't work.

Nanny states don't work in a society where nobody wants it. It works in Finland and Sweden.



People can, and have, taken to the streets. Shouting blame, and pointing fingers, and of course acting violently. It was predictable that riots would start.

Of course. Because their government is owned by the banks. If you are pissed at Greek protesters, surely, you hate tea partiers and OWS.



A little individual responsibility, and hard work would have avoided this mess.

The Greek work more than the average American and the average European... so please.

They would have avoided this mess... if their government wasn't working for the banks.

And guess what pal, unless you live in Iceland, Iran or Syria, the banks own your government and your country will be screwed... you're just not as far down the road as Greece is.

So if you are in the US, when it goes bankrupt, you will be cheering for China and Japan to install a puppet in Washington DC to repay all that money to them right?

edit on 16-2-2012 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:39 AM
link   
Seems very strange to me that a captain is expected to go down with his ship, but when the captains of industry sink the ecomony its the crew that is expected to go down whilst the captain sips champagne from his launch.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:41 AM
link   

Originally posted by Heros_son
reply to post by colin42
 


The Greeks dug their own hole. The debt stems from the countless entitlements. It's a shining example of why "nanny states" don't work.

What would these "countless entitlements" be exactly? No, the largest chunk of debt comes from corrupt politicians. Period. It is they who drive the cost of public works up, because of bribery. It is they who decide that we need to spend tremendous amounts on defense. And guess who benefits from those? Germany, France and the USA. Another large chunk of debt stems from the Olympics in 2004.

Originally posted by Heros_son
A little individual responsibility, and hard work would have avoided this mess.

Tell that to our politicians. The working class people are both individually responsible and work hard, while they get paid peanuts.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:47 AM
link   
1 in 3 Greeks works for the government.
Retirement age in Greece is 53.
Government spending accounts for 46% of GDP.
Public debt exceeds 115% of GDP.

These numbers are not sustainable.
edit on 16-2-2012 by Heros_son because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:51 AM
link   
reply to post by Vitchilo
 


The President yesterday said the following:

'I can't accept Mr Schauble taunting my country. I can't accept this -- as a Greek. Who is Mr Schauble... to taunt Greece? Who are the Dutch? Who are the Finns? We always had the pride to defend not only our freedom, not only our country, but the freedom of Europe.'

This is a diplomatic F you!



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:59 AM
link   
reply to post by Heros_son
 


Do you have a source for the numbers you presented? And no the retirement age is not 53 for a worker. It might have been for the military (it's about to change now) and some other special case professions (eg. women in certain professions), but not for the average working class people.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:08 AM
link   

Originally posted by Heros_son

These numbers are not sustainable.
edit on 16-2-2012 by Heros_son because: (no reason given)


Because they're made up



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:11 AM
link   

Originally posted by WalterRatlos
reply to post by Heros_son
 


Do you have a source for the numbers you presented? And no the retirement age is not 53 for a worker. It might have been for the military (it's about to change now) and some other special case professions (eg. women in certain professions), but not for the average working class people.


exactly. That was just for Cops and Military etc.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:13 AM
link   
reply to post by WalterRatlos
 


I'm looking for the links. Dick Armey and Matt Kibbe, of FreedomWorks were where I got my info. I think it was reported by Washington Post. Like I said, I'm looking for the specific article.

Age 53, I derived from 18 yrs old + 35 yrs of work (govt. employees) to reach retirement.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:15 AM
link   
reply to post by Heros_son
 


You can believe whatever, you want too. But sometimes you have to do some research. For example your retirement age.
The first source is from the German "Spiegel", which had an interesting article called :The Myth of a Lazy Southern Europe- Merkel´s Cliches Debunked by Statistics.

The second Source: OECD, based on national labour force surveys.


Peace



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:21 AM
link   
reply to post by Hellas
 


Here is the LINK for the GDP numbers.

As of 2010, Greek GDP public debt was reported as 142%. The site also has info for other GDP stats.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:24 AM
link   
reply to post by Seed76
 

The Huffington Post reported the average age of Greek retirement is 53.
HERE
The Washinton Post reported Greek retirement age is 53.
HERE
edit on 16-2-2012 by Heros_son because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 11:13 AM
link   

Originally posted by Vitchilo
Germany is basically talking about forced REGIME CHANGE in Greece... that is a declaration of war.

No one forces regime change... there is still the option to say no.

Schäuble and De Jager said (according to the article in german FT) they don't trust the new elected greek government to feel obligated to the conditions for the next payment.
An alternative suggestion was to delay the rescue package until after the elections, so the agreement could be assured by the new elected government.
They don't want to agree to more financial aid before they know the necessary reforms will be enacted.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 11:26 AM
link   

Originally posted by Heros_son
reply to post by Seed76
 

The Huffington Post reported the average age of Greek retirement is 53.
HERE
The Washinton Post reported Greek retirement age is 53.
HERE
edit on 16-2-2012 by Heros_son because: (no reason given)


I tell you it's not



new topics

top topics



 
14
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join