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releasing sterile cats into the ecosystem

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posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 08:42 AM
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I've had an idea for a while that rather than euthanizing excess cats the human society should sterilize them, vaccinate them, and release them into the environment. These sterile cats would compete with the other feral cats. It would probably reduce diseases because many of the feral cats would be vaccinated and sterilized. It shouldn't increase the feral cat population.

Has anybody heard of someone trying this idea?




posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by cloudyday
 


There are various trap and release programs already. I don't think as a general rule releasing anything into the wild for any reason other than they belong there is a good idea. We cannot change eco systems randomly and every time we try we end up making matters much worse. Would it also be a good idea to spay and neuter dogs and then re-release them back into the wild? Not really. Besides, there is no "wild" left.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:00 AM
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Originally posted by newcovenant
reply to post by cloudyday
 


There are various trap and release programs already. I don't think as a general rule releasing anything into the wild for any reason other than they belong there is a good idea. We cannot change eco systems randomly and every time we try we end up making matters much worse. Would it also be a good idea to spay and neuter dogs and then re-release them back into the wild? Not really. Besides, there is no "wild" left.


Thanks, I thought they must be doing something like this already. I don't think releasing cats from the humane society should affect the ecosystem, because the new cats would displace some of the less healthy feral cats. Of course it wouldn't be ethical to release too many cats at once, and it would be best to release the cats that were strays to begin with so they would have the best chance of survival.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by cloudyday
 

There are already millions of feral cats in the US, and they are already decimating wild bird populations. Adding more cats to the mix will only make things worse. Also, there are feline diseases that cats usually aren't vaccinated for- FIP is a terrible disease without a reliable vaccine. On top of all that, increasing the already massive population of feral cats will just increase their competition for resources, such as food, water, and shelter, which would make their tough lives even harder. So, releasing more cats to the huge feral cat population would just make things worse, IMO.

Unfortunately, a lot of irresponsible people adopt animals and abandon them without having them spayed or neutered. This adds to the huge number of feral cats, and puts a lot of unlucky animals in shelters that are short on resources to care for them. The only option a lot of those places have is to euthanize perfectly healthy pets. I hate that this happens; it really makes me sick because I've always loved animals. Sadly, the problem will continue if people keep adopting pets without realizing the responsibility that comes with them.
edit on 16-2-2012 by oggleboggle47 because: wanted to add something



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:21 AM
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Originally posted by oggleboggle47
reply to post by cloudyday
 

There are already millions of feral cats in the US, and they are already decimating wild bird populations. Adding more cats to the mix will only make things worse. Also, there are feline diseases that cats usually aren't vaccinated for- FIP is a terrible disease without a reliable vaccine. On top of all that, increasing the already massive population of feral cats will just increase their competition for resources, such as food, water, and shelter, which would make their tough lives even harder. So, releasing more cats to the huge feral cat population would just make things worse, IMO.

Unfortunately, a lot of irresponsible people adopt animals and abandon them without having them spayed or neutered. This adds to the huge number of feral cats, and puts a lot of unlucky animals in shelters that are short on resources to care for them. The only option a lot of those places have is to euthanize perfectly healthy pets. I hate that this happens; it really makes me sick because I've always loved animals. Sadly, the problem will continue if people keep adopting pets without realizing the responsibility that comes with them.
edit on 16-2-2012 by oggleboggle47 because: wanted to add something


I mostly agree with you. However, here is a link to an article about the benefits of feral cats. Apparently cats increase the bird population by killing the rodents that eat their eggs.
What if All the Cats in the World Died

I totally agree with what you say about sterilizing pets. There are so many cats and dogs in the world right now that no responsible pet owner should keep their animal intact. If they want a kitten or puppy they should get one from the shelter.
edit on 16-2-2012 by cloudyday because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:29 AM
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reply to post by cloudyday
 


Thanks for that info! That's really interesting-I forgot to add rodents to the equation.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:44 AM
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I've heard of various veterinarians from various areas doing this. It's helpful, and they make sure that if they take them from a certain area, they are returned to that exact area.


We don't have tons and tons of wild cats in Canada, as far as I know, and they don't destroy our bird population, because they have so many mice and other rodents. They also have their own natural predators, which keeps the population down too.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 11:50 AM
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Originally posted by snowspirit
I've heard of various veterinarians from various areas doing this. It's helpful, and they make sure that if they take them from a certain area, they are returned to that exact area.


We don't have tons and tons of wild cats in Canada, as far as I know, and they don't destroy our bird population, because they have so many mice and other rodents. They also have their own natural predators, which keeps the population down too.



I suppose feral cats might have a hard time making it through the winter in Canada unless they can find a warm spot under a house or in a barn. Maybe that keeps the population under control.
edit on 16-2-2012 by cloudyday because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 01:11 PM
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There are small localised programmes here in some parts of Malaysia that catch feral/stray/abandoned cats, desex, vaccinate, deworm them etc etc then take them back where they found them.

Its not ideal but its better than destroying them.

To drop a domesticated cat out somewhere its chances of survival would be slim and in my opinion just cruel



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by IkNOwSTuff
There are small localised programmes here in some parts of Malaysia that catch feral/stray/abandoned cats, desex, vaccinate, deworm them etc etc then take them back where they found them.

Its not ideal but its better than destroying them.

To drop a domesticated cat out somewhere its chances of survival would be slim and in my opinion just cruel



I see your point, but I think some shelter cats would have a reasonable chance of survival in the wild. I just thought it might be kinder than killing them in those cases where they could take care of themselves. Maybe there could be a trial program where they track the shelter cats to see if they can make it.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 01:40 PM
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I have 2 adopted ferals I adopted as 4 week old kittens, 1 rescue from a breeder, and 1 stray that had been out well over 2 years in the wild and had become quite feral. All are healthy and happy, with the exception of an FIV+ male, who we aren't worried about spreading the disease as he is quite gentle and doesn't like to fight. They also stay inside at all times.

Cats that are outside cats have a life expectancy of about 2-3 years. Indoor cats can live their entire lifespan of some 15-20 years.

I have participated in spay/neuter/release programs, and in the end, it makes for healthier cats. The females aren't having litter after litter, the males aren't fighting as much. This in return not only reduces the population overall, but the population that does exist is healthier. Only one kitten per litter on average survives in the wild.

SK



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by SweetKarma
I have 2 adopted ferals I adopted as 4 week old kittens, 1 rescue from a breeder, and 1 stray that had been out well over 2 years in the wild and had become quite feral. All are healthy and happy, with the exception of an FIV+ male, who we aren't worried about spreading the disease as he is quite gentle and doesn't like to fight. They also stay inside at all times.

Cats that are outside cats have a life expectancy of about 2-3 years. Indoor cats can live their entire lifespan of some 15-20 years.

I have participated in spay/neuter/release programs, and in the end, it makes for healthier cats. The females aren't having litter after litter, the males aren't fighting as much. This in return not only reduces the population overall, but the population that does exist is healthier. Only one kitten per litter on average survives in the wild.

SK


I didn't realize the life expectancy was so short for outdoor cats (I assume you mean feral cats and stray cats).

My previous cat was a stray that had already been spayed. She had some vexing health problems, so I've always suspected she was somebody's pet but that person couldn't afford the expenses and turned her loose on the streets rather than put her to sleep. She was about 6 when I adopted her and she lived to be about 17. She had a serious tooth infection and the vet wasn't sure if she would live when I picked her up. I don't know how long she was a stray. The first few years her health kept declining until I found a good veterinarian that turned it around.

So I guess I see both sides. I know being a stray or feral is tough, but maybe some of them will find a home again.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 08:41 PM
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reply to post by cloudyday
 


Didn't you learn anything from Jurassic Park? Hahaha
But the idea has potential, but I dont think it would be too effective.



posted on Apr, 27 2012 @ 12:42 PM
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A program called TNR, Trap,Neuter, Return
is becoming very popular and gaining ground
in a lot of communities. These cats are returned
to their enviroment in managed,supervised colonies.
There is an estimated 80 to 100 million stray cats in
this country all do to owner neglect. Also, there is no
such thing as a feral cat. Cats have been a domestic
species for over 2000 years. The cat is a timid animal
and is in fear due to not having human contact.
Our sanctuary for sick and injured felines does extensive
work in this area.




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