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Cops to sticker New Orleans homes with a 'Scarlet Letter'

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posted on Feb, 15 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by brainswippin
 


No just politicrats that are potential users, but any political whore that take briberies from big interest as most of the whores in Washington gets inside traiding for been just good whores.

How about a big red W for whore in front of their fancy pristine homes





posted on Feb, 15 2012 @ 09:22 PM
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Glad they cancelled it. Very bad idea and I would wager if challenged would not be allowed. I lived in an apartment complex years ago with some BLATANT drug deals going on but still would despise this idea. It would be fun to make a few anonymous phone calls from a few pay phones and have the idiot neighbor that lets his dog off the leash (yappy little POS) slapped with a scarlet letter though. But that is the problem as I'm sure a few neighbors hate me and I don't do anything illegal (except jaywalk and speed).



posted on Feb, 15 2012 @ 09:37 PM
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As monumentally stupid ideas go this one is way up there.

I picture pissed off ex girlfriends will be having their exes houses stickered along with any neighbor dispute.

Do the police have the authority to devalue personal property based soley on a hotline tip?


Glad to see they axed it, but the fact that anyone thought this was a good idea is scary as hell.
edit on 15-2-2012 by AGWskeptic because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2012 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by AGWskeptic
 


Actually it only shows that from elected officials in your local states and cities to the big Politicians in Washington we are been ruled by nothing but morons.




posted on Feb, 15 2012 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


seriously? you have a home that has gone up in value over the last 5 years? I can go buy a car for 500 bucks and in a week or a year or in 5 years its still a $500 car

Let me rephrase, you have a home in New Orleans that has gone up in value over the last 5 years?

I only have what you are saying to go by here!!!







posted on Feb, 15 2012 @ 10:51 PM
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Reminds me of the time the New Orleans police chief at the time of the Katrina hurricane was at a news conference about the police abandoning or unable to patrol.

He was wearing a hat that said "NO" PD .....

Very appropriate at the time.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 03:43 AM
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Originally posted by rockoperawriter
to me those stickers are a sign of poor losers. "we're losing the drug war miserably" is what it says

Its A bit hard to win A war when your enemy is backed by your government!



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 04:17 AM
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Originally posted by rebellender
seriously? you have a home that has gone up in value over the last 5 years? I can go buy a car for 500 bucks and in a week or a year or in 5 years its still a $500 car.

The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

I am not sure what you’re getting at here.
Yes. I own a house that has increased in value in the last five years. I bought it low after the crash, and did a lot of work to it. It has almost doubled in value since when I purchased it. No. Its not in New Orleans, but that has no bearing on my point.

My point is that "real property" is a whole branch of law, and any negative action taken by a person/group that affects the value of homes in an area is actionable in a court. So, for example, if my neighbor paints his house hot pink, and it makes the property values go down, I can actually take him to court over it:

Neighbors hurting your homes value
If you can't get local agencies to help, appeal to your elected representatives at the city or county level. Sometimes these folks can kick the bureaucracy into gear. A real-estate attorney can tell you if you can pursue a lawsuit against the neighbor, but typically these are expensive and can drag on for months if not years, making them impractical for most people trying to sell a home.

This is where some of the power home owners associations wield comes from. You don’t have the right to do just anything you want to on your “real property”, because your “real property” is attached to your neighbor’s “real property”, and affects his properties value. This is also why almost every state has laws, codes, and/or ordinances regarding what you can do with your “real property”, and they can come out and fine you for non-compliance.

None of this applies to cars, which are not considered “real property”:

Legal Definition of Real Property
real property n. 1) all land, structures, firmly attached and integrated equipment (such as light fixtures or a well pump), anything growing on the land, and all "interests" in the property which may be the right to future ownership (remainder), right to occupy for a period of time (tenancy or life estate) the right to drill for oil, the right to get the property back (a reversion) if it is no longer used for its current purpose (such as use for a hospital, school or city hall), use of airspace (condominium) or an easement across another's property. Real property should be thought of as a group of rights like a bundle of sticks which can be divided. It is distinguished from the other type of property, personal property, which is made up of movable items. 2) one of the principal areas of law like contracts, negligence, probate, family law and criminal law.

Also, I don’t know where you get that your $500 car is not going to depreciate. I assure you that it most certainly will:

Know the deal on Auto Depreciation
Here's a standard rule of thumb about used cars. A car loses 15 percent to 20 percent of its value each year.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.


edit on 2/16/2012 by defcon5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 04:24 AM
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If I was the ACLU the whole anonymous tip=raid thing would bother me a lot more than an orange letter.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 05:16 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 




Thank you for that information Defcon. I've written up many Real Estste articles for companies all over the world but not once did I use the info. you posted here. It was always about the ramifications of lowered property values, not the legal ramifications.

To be honest, I never thought there was any because I never reseached it or even heard about it anywhere.

And to think I actually learned something constructive on ATS today.





posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 06:36 AM
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reply to post by Taupin Desciple
 
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Knowing some “real law” can be pretty handy, especially if you rent.
Landlords tend to think they know the law a lot better then they actually do.

When I was in an apartment I complained about my downstairs neighbor having frat parties until 04:00 am. The neighbor then complained that I “walked too loudly in my apartment”. I received the notice that I was being written a warning by the complex. So I went down to the landlords office to talk to her about it.

She understood that it was all about retribution with me for my compliant, but that she had to write me up. I explained to her that walking is not internally disturbing the peace, it is normal usage of the apartment, and that is why I paid a higher premium for my place on the higher floor. She agreed, but told me that she could write me up for anything she so pleased. I tried to explain that she legally could not write me up for walking, and she respectfully disagreed with me.

So…

The first thing I did after I left her office was to walk around the complex, and write down all the apartments with grills on their porches. Then I called the city fire marshal.
$5000 fine to the complex per apartment with a grill stored under an overhang…


After that, I notified her that she had contractually breached the terms of their lease with me, and that I sought to terminate it with the intent to file for a constructive eviction:

Constructive eviction is a term used in the law of real property to describe a circumstance in which a landlord either does something or fails to do something that he has a legal duty to provide (e.g. the landlord refuses to provide heat or water to the apartment), rendering the property uninhabitable. A tenant who is constructively evicted may terminate the lease and seek damages.
Sighting that stopping me from walking around my apartment was a constructive eviction due to it rendering my apartment uninhabitable for normal use and enjoyment.

When they realized that they were going to have to pay me the monthly rent for the remainder of my lease agreement (Something like $24,000), plus all fees incurred with moving me to a new apartment, suddenly it dawned on here that she could in fact NOT write me up for just anything she wanted too, and that I knew exactly what I was talking about. I am guessing that she contacted the complexes corporate attorney (it was a big national firm), and got her butt reamed out, because I received a VERY polite notice that they had removed my warning, and that I was free to walk a loudly as I wanted around my apartment to my hearts content.

I lived there for an additional 3 years, and they were so polite to me during that time I cannot even begin to explain it. They were even ubber nice about writing in to my lender when I bought my house. Probably they were afraid that if they said anything bad I would sue them for slander/liable.


However, people play on other peoples ignorance of the law to get their way. If you have some idea of what the law really is, then you have an advantage over 99% of the other people out there.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


Hey Defcon5, I totally agree that it SHOULD be the responsibility of the department to fix any damage to the property. Unfortunately, the reality of it is when they bust down a door or destroy a knob to get into someone's house and serve a warrant the renter, homeowner, or family (if they found something) is responsible to fix it.

Dumb move by the NOPD. Good thing they rescinded it because it would have resulted in many lawsuits. Although, if there is ever another Katrina incident the NOPD would just take care of anyone they feel like offing.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 08:06 AM
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reply to post by HellstormRising
 
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

I think that if you are found guilty then its your own fault, but if they don’t find anything you can sue them to pay for the damages. I believe that you have to take them to court over this however, they are not going to just willingly send you a check in the mail.

Dealing with search warrants
Most searches are very destructive. Your property is likely to be thrown about and damaged. So after the police have gone, take three or four dozen photographs of the place, before doing any clean-up. These may be useful in defending against criminal charges and/or in suing the police. Make sure you’ve got good enough lighting that the photos will come out well.


Family gets $333,000 for 2009 raid in which cops killed dog
A federal jury awarded $333,000 to a Chicago family Thursday after Chicago police officers raided its South Side home with guns drawn and shot its dog in a search that found no criminal activity in the apartment.


Maui couple sues police over home search
KIHEI, Maui >> A Kihei couple is suing the Maui Police Department alleging officers raided their home while executing a search warrant on the wrong address.
The Maui News reports that April and Norman Freeland filed the lawsuit in federal court in Honolulu in October.
The lawsuit alleges that on April 15 officers forced the Freelands to wait outside while they searched the residence for nearly half an hour, even after they knew they were at the wrong address.
The complaint claims police violated the plaintiffs’ constitutional rights and seeks $250,000 in damages and $1 million in punitive damages.
County lawyers say officers were inside the Freelands’ home for less than 10 minutes and left as soon as they realized they were at the wrong location.

Of course if they find something, you’re SOL.

NOW...
What really needs to happen is that people who make false accusations also need to also be held legally responsible.I believe that they can be arrested for making a false report, but the police don’t usually do crap about that. They want people to call in tips. So what happens is that us tax payers end up paying the price for this nonsense.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 08:15 AM
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Originally posted by defcon5
What really needs to happen is that people who make false accusations also need to also be held legally responsible.I believe that they can be arrested for making a false report, but the police don’t usually do crap about that. They want people to call in tips. So what happens is that us tax payers end up paying the price for this nonsense.



I was thinking about the "tip" thing this morning. Sure, anyone can call in a tip anonymously for giggles or for vengeance or for being overly paranoid.

But what of police calling in their own "tips" to justify acting on a residence they may not have enough justification to act on?

"We cant get this warrant so Officer Frank go and make an anonymous 'tip' so we can kick a door in" kind of thing.

They already make cell calls from address claiming domestic violence so they can kick doors in.

I cant imagine anything ever being done. Lawsuits already cost taxpayers millions. People have already been killed. And any attention or outrage is basically ignored. These instances get local media attention that lasts a night or two tops when this being a national problem should be getting all of the network muckrackers out in force hammering away at the lives and property lost by over-eager militarized police forces.

Instead the media covers "teabagging" as a method of bullying. How about a paramilitary force kicking your door in, shooting your pets and dragging your family out in their underpants?



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


I am sure the guys dealing drugs will be happy to know that the orange sticker will devalue their homes. I am sure they have some nice properties that dodged the Hurricane. And I am sure the people living in nice homes trying to put their nice homes on the market do not want orange stickers on the doors of the Crackheads next door.

this being said thankyou you have brought me to deny Ignorance.

Help me out with one thing. When did we as a law abiding society start a Robin Hood movement for Drug dealers Child pedophiles and murderers. Oh their Rights...OK...you mean the ones they choose to give up when they commit a crime? Dont even throw the "innocent until proved guilty" or "it's alleged" until they get there day in court Card at me.

Momma turned a blind eye to Jr.'s and Sissy's law breaking activities. I am not Momma Jr. and Sissy get a nice new home. You been paying for their welfare, time to put them way behind bars.

WD-40 takes a sticker off and real fast....soap and water takes off the oil stain.
edit on 16-2-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:59 AM
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reply to post by rebellender
 
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Yeah, despite our governments best efforts over the last few years we stall have that “damn piece of paper” called the Constitution here. Maybe you're just not cut out for life in the US. If I may suggest some places where you might feel more at home:

Democratic People's Republic of Korea
People's Republic of China
Socialist Republic of Vietnam
Republic of Cuba

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 11:06 AM
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I've been reading more about this, and it's pretty obvious this was a bust and a no-starter from the get go...not thought through from any angle. A big waste of some peoples' time and our money.

But along the lines of some of their rationalization for this, I actually don't think it would be a totally bad idea to notify people of known drug dealers in their area and restrict the movement of those convicted of such crimes (not allowed close to schools). Key word here is convicted, and even then, as with the rules for convicted rapists and pedophiles, there are always going to be some resulting injustices and consequences.

I missed this on my first read too...

Previously, Chief Serpas applied the idea to the city of Nashville, Tennessee, where homes were branded with a similar sticker. There, the emblems were two feet wide and neon green.

Seems Nashville was first. On a quick scan, I'm not finding a lot of information about this being implemented there.
edit on 2/16/2012 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 12:12 PM
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Originally posted by defcon5
reply to post by rebellender
 
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Yeah, despite our governments best efforts over the last few years we stall have that “damn piece of paper” called the Constitution here. Maybe you're just not cut out for life in the US. If I may suggest some places where you might feel more at home:

Democratic People's Republic of Korea
People's Republic of China
Socialist Republic of Vietnam
Republic of Cuba

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



Is this how you suggest to Deny Ignorance?
Is this what you suggest when we both have points of value. You stay and I am banished to a Communist Country.

How about the Constitutional right to Pursue Prosperity of Home Ownership without the Drug lords, crackheads,and life long criminals living next door.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 12:23 PM
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Originally posted by defcon5
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


If the police attached anything to my private property, I’d get the house professionally resurfaced and repainted on their dime, and I’d most likely have legal support from whoever holds my mortgage. This will stop after the police department is civilly sued and has to pay out a bunch of money.

Most people who live in a house don’t own it, a bank or mortgage company does. This affects the value of that home, and the police would be civilly responsible for any defacement and drop in the homes value associated with doing it.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.


You nailed it right there my friend, always, follow the money, funny how that usually leads to a bank...
:bnghd:



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 12:57 PM
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Where can I get one of those. I would stick it to my door before family comes to visit. Great conversation starter.



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