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posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 09:29 AM
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Could it be that the galaxy never stops spiralling towards the black hole?

Could it be that when we reach the event horizon, we reach a new area of condensed spacetime where everything increases in intensity, but everything still lives on?

Could it also be that the reason we can't observe the endlessness of this spiralling tunnel is because it is a condensed area of spacetime?

Could it also be that at the outer edge of the galaxy, there are more stars than we see, but the reason we can't see them is because in that region of expanded spacetime, light moves faster than the light in this region of spacetime?

And at the center of the galaxy, the reason it is brighter is because spacetime is more condensed and there actually is more light per cubic inch than there is in our region of spacetime. But if you go far enough, it become so condensed that it can't be observed because the light seems to "stand still."

When I imagine existence and our galaxy, I imagine an endless spiralling tunnel. If its true, that, there is no end to the galaxy and no beginning, but that all is just different spacetime densities, then this could support the idea of hyperdimensional realities that have previously been speculated upon.
edit on 14-2-2012 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 


When I think of the galaxi design to me they look like the oppisite sides of another energy sort of like a root to its tree. So this side of the black hole or galaxi energy as they are called maybe the roots to a much more developed tree of existence. Now how do you get from root level to branch or even leaf?? Maybe thru the various phases of life and death within existence. Intersting thread snf



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 09:37 AM
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To add the ground level of awarness from root level to tree level would be the barrier of the what is called universe inside universe root - outside universe tree.
edit on 2/14/12 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 


Light escaping from a "condensed space-time" would expand along the expanding space-time. So you wouldn't see a bright knot in the center of the galaxy as the light coming from there would expand, too.

You have to look at a place of "condensed space-time" from within - you wouldn't find any difference to places outside that area. So to say, light would still go only 300.000 km/s, even if the km would be "shorter" seen from the outside. Its related to Einsteins theories.



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by ManFromEurope
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


Light escaping from a "condensed space-time" would expand along the expanding space-time. So you wouldn't see a bright knot in the center of the galaxy as the light coming from there would expand, too.


But wouldn't you though? Since the light in the "condensed spacetime" is more densely compacted, then wouldn't it also escape in a densely compacted way? So it would still be densely compacted, but would also be moving at normal speed.


You have to look at a place of "condensed space-time" from within - you wouldn't find any difference to places outside that area. So to say, light would still go only 300.000 km/s, even if the km would be "shorter" seen from the outside. Its related to Einsteins theories.


I kinda see what you're saying. But if light speed reamains constant over a "shorter or longer km", how would it not be observed as moving slower or faster resepectively?

It would be. 300,000 km/s. If a km in compressed spacetime is equal to two km in normal spacetime, then the light is actually observed as moving 150,000 km/s.



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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wait



Your questions and speculations will be answered when you reach the end of the circle.
edit on 14-2-2012 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:45 AM
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Originally posted by smithjustinb

Originally posted by ManFromEurope
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


Light escaping from a "condensed space-time" would expand along the expanding space-time. So you wouldn't see a bright knot in the center of the galaxy as the light coming from there would expand, too.


But wouldn't you though? Since the light in the "condensed spacetime" is more densely compacted, then wouldn't it also escape in a densely compacted way? So it would still be densely compacted, but would also be moving at normal speed.

But as soon as the light leaves that compacted spacetime, it would unravel itself, lenghten itself (under a red-shift into gamma-radiation, I think) and would therefore look like light escaping from a place of normal spacetime. Problem is, WHAT is a condensed spacetime, really? Is there a gravity-well, like a black hole or another highly compressed and very heavy body? How does the condensation work? Spacetime just shrinked - well, that sounds like a blackhole to me.



You have to look at a place of "condensed space-time" from within - you wouldn't find any difference to places outside that area. So to say, light would still go only 300.000 km/s, even if the km would be "shorter" seen from the outside. Its related to Einsteins theories.


I kinda see what you're saying. But if light speed reamains constant over a "shorter or longer km", how would it not be observed as moving slower or faster resepectively?

It would be. 300,000 km/s. If a km in compressed spacetime is equal to two km in normal spacetime, then the light is actually observed as moving 150,000 km/s.


No - as far as I would think, light would be seen at 300.000 km/s regardless of your subjective system, just like in Einsteins relativity formulas. Light goes at 300.00 km/s in vacuum - thats an axiom of Einstein, I will take it for this for granted, as there is no known (or even possible?) counter-evidence. Even if you would ride a rocket going 299.000 km/s and you would light a beam straight ahead, it would still go with a relative speed of 300.000 km/s away from your rocket.

Same goes in condensed spacetime.

Look at a blackhole like Einstein described it: On board a rocket which comes close to the event horizon, you would feel that you are just "right now" are falling into the blackhole. An observer outside would think that your speed declined to very near 0 km/s the closer you get to the event horizon.

This time- and spacedilation would happen in a condensed spacetime, as long as its effects are based on gravity (which defines spacetime under Einsteins rules). Thus there would be effects regarding your light, escaping from that place.
As light "climbs up" the gravity well of a condensed spacetime, it would loose energy, which would NOT slow it down, but shift its wavelength into infrared and deeper (longer) wavelengths, regarding to the amount of lost energy. It would not slow down.

Okay, time for a thought-experiment:
Take a place of spacetime condensation - from the outside it may be 1.000 km in diameter. From the inside 100.000 km.
I think that a beam of light crossing this area would take 1/300 s, if seen from the outside. There would be a massive infrared-emission from the place of intrusion into that area, as the beam of light would be "stretched" by a factor of 100. At the place of extrusion, there would be gamma radiation, as the beam of light would be "compressed".

Fascinating. Nice thing for thought-experiments.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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Originally posted by ManFromEurope

It would be. 300,000 km/s. If a km in compressed spacetime is equal to two km in normal spacetime, then the light is actually observed as moving 150,000 km/s.


No - as far as I would think, light would be seen at 300.000 km/s regardless of your subjective system, just like in Einsteins relativity formulas. Light goes at 300.00 km/s in vacuum - thats an axiom of Einstein, I will take it for this for granted, as there is no known (or even possible?) counter-evidence. Even if you would ride a rocket going 299.000 km/s and you would light a beam straight ahead, it would still go with a relative speed of 300.000 km/s away from your rocket.


Now that is weird. So light never changes speed and if you go faster, it does too, but at the same time it doesn't?

If I'm travelling at 299 km/s the light I see would still be travelling at 300 km/s away from me? I can't understand why a person standing still watching all of this go on would not see the light travelling at 599 km/s.
edit on 16-2-2012 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-2-2012 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:17 AM
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Originally posted by ManFromEurope

Originally posted by smithjustinb

Originally posted by ManFromEurope
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


Light escaping from a "condensed space-time" would expand along the expanding space-time. So you wouldn't see a bright knot in the center of the galaxy as the light coming from there would expand, too.


But wouldn't you though? Since the light in the "condensed spacetime" is more densely compacted, then wouldn't it also escape in a densely compacted way? So it would still be densely compacted, but would also be moving at normal speed.

But as soon as the light leaves that compacted spacetime, it would unravel itself, lenghten itself (under a red-shift into gamma-radiation, I think) and would therefore look like light escaping from a place of normal spacetime. Problem is, WHAT is a condensed spacetime, really? Is there a gravity-well, like a black hole or another highly compressed and very heavy body? How does the condensation work? Spacetime just shrinked - well, that sounds like a blackhole to me.


It is a black hole. Not only does the black hole condense matter into a singularity, it also condenses spacetime into a singularity. The thing about a singularity (a single point) is that it can't be defined. The second you think you have found the smallest point of what it could be, it gets smaller. So everything that gets sucked into a black hole travels toward infinity.

I'm saying the hole itself, at the beginning of the event horizon is the compressed spacetime caused by the presence of the singularity that is free to shrink in size for an infinite period of time. Since the sinuglarity shrinks, it also pulls everything down with it. Eventually, you get to a region (event-horizon) where spacetime is shrinking at a greater rate than normal spacetime. That is condensed spacetime. Light can't escape it because travelling through condensed spacetime is easier than travelling through expanded spacetime.

I'm basically saying that matter can stay intact, but in a different form at the event horizon. You can't see inside a blackhole because light can't leave it. Actually, light does escape black holes as quasars. The light leaves in such a compressed form that we can't tell what we're looking at, but I bet if you could zoom in on a quasar, you could see individual stars.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by ManFromEurope

Look at a blackhole like Einstein described it: On board a rocket which comes close to the event horizon, you would feel that you are just "right now" are falling into the blackhole. An observer outside would think that your speed declined to very near 0 km/s the closer you get to the event horizon.

This time- and spacedilation would happen in a condensed spacetime, as long as its effects are based on gravity (which defines spacetime under Einsteins rules). Thus there would be effects regarding your light, escaping from that place.
As light "climbs up" the gravity well of a condensed spacetime, it would loose energy, which would NOT slow it down, but shift its wavelength into infrared and deeper (longer) wavelengths, regarding to the amount of lost energy. It would not slow down.



But if this were true, how come there are quasars?



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by smithjustinb

Now that is weird. So light never changes speed and if you go faster, it does too, but at the same time it doesn't?

If I'm travelling at 299 km/s the light I see would still be travelling at 300 km/s away from me? I can't understand why a person standing still watching all of this go on would not see the light traveling at 599 km/s.


Light speed isn't changing, time frame of the traveling observer is. A stationary observer has nothing to do with the traveling observer time dilation. The Lorentz factor.











 
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