As Promised, Alonzo Typer Checking In

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posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 10:29 PM
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Great stuff, very interesting.

I wonder, this craft you worked on deep underground, did it look like the cigar shaped craft you had spotted during WW II?




posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 10:30 PM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


To be quite honest, I feel ashamed to say this, but for the first several years of the War, I did nothing more than sand the bulk of the hull, and repaint to prevent rust. This was a constant battle, and I felt awful thinking of the brave Marines who were storming the beaches, while I sanded and painted.

It took years before I was able to be stationed in the position I mentioned. I could go on about this forever, but I figure this is in every History Book



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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I must probe you about a couple of statements you made in this posting.
You say you spent most of your time on the carrier Yorktown as a B-25 radio man. It was sunk early in the war on 5 June, 1942, at the battle of Midway.

As far as I can tell, the only B-25s that ever flew from a carrier were the 16 of the Doolittle raid on Japan about two months earlier on 18 April, 1942. Can you please clarify this for us. I hate to say it, but your credibility is at stake as much as I would like to accept your story.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 10:37 PM
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Originally posted by NuminousCosmos
There was only ONE raid.

Colonel Richard E. Cole, copilot of aircraft #1
Major Thomas C. Griffin, navigator of aircraft #9
Lieutenant Colonel Robert L. Hite, copilot of aircraft #16
Major Edward Joseph Saylor, engineer of aircraft #15
Staff Sergeant David J. Thatcher, gunner of aircraft #7

So, Typer...you are one of these men? They are the last survivors of the Doolittle Raid. Glad we could narrow it down.

Tell me, what year is on that Cognac bottle?
edit on 2/13/2012 by NuminousCosmos because: (no reason given)


Clearly you do not know everything as it went down, I could sit here and argue with you all night or you can read up on your history.


In the Pacific, bombers were used from the outset of U.S. involvement, starting with the Mitchell Raid on Tokyo in April 1942. Bombing of naval and ground targets was first used to defend against Japanese advances, then shifted to support of the American advances, and finally to strategic bombing of the Japanese home islands. Before the war ended on 2 September 1945 with the unconditional surrender of Japan, thousands of heavy bombers were flying around the clock to destroy every valid target. The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6 August and 9 August 1945, were the most dramatic single attacks, but massive conventional bombing operations were also horribly devastating and effective.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 10:42 PM
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You may pick apart every piece of my story if you like. I honestly do not care, I'm simply trying to reference unusual things that occured during my lifetime.

First everyone wanted to know details on so called craft I had seen.

Now, everyone is going to pick apart my details of WWII and try to use that to take away any credibility. If I would have known World War II was going to be the focal point, I would have just taken the time to sit down and dictate every last detail so there would be no doubters.

Once again, my mistake.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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If anything, this thread is interesting.

If you are who you say you are, Kudos to you old timer.

If you're not, then we should you to the lions. Just kidding....sort of.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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In your defense I have to say something.

My business deals in antiques and historical documents. One of my favorite niches is WW2 Era items and documents. I'm also a big fan of the era and it's culture, lingo, etc. Some people may not notice what I do but your written 'mannerisms' are in line with someone of your age who was involved in the military or of that era.

Little things you say pop out at me. They're sublime and may be unnoticed by the average person, but I'm picking up on them.

Just a thought.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 10:50 PM
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As a reminder to everyone:

The Gray Area: The Gray Area is a discussion forum that provides a dedicated area for members to post their confessions, disclosures, and related extraordinary personal experiences. Like the highly speculative Skunk Works forum, The Gray Area will tolerate topics that may be unusually hypothetical or unproven for the purpose of vetting the stories of thread-starters by the ATS membership at large.

As has been said many times, ATS has been hoaxed many times. Tall tales have been told many times. This is not to say the OP is doing this. This is to say, it happens.

The members here are not only sharp and extremely knowledgeable but yes, they do vet stories that are extraordinary. It is to be expected and should be welcomed. However, let us all remember, you may debate and question stories until your fingers bleed but you must do so with Civility and Decorum. Manners are expected.

 


edit on February 13th 2012 by greeneyedleo because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by AlonzoTyper
 


I love history...we live in it everyday. However, you're claiming to have been a pilot on one of the bombers used in the Doolittle raid. This is not something that someone says lightly. If this were true, you are a national hero. Your name is engraved on a silver cup sitting on a shelf among the honored dead that participated in this event, you share in the glory of the Medal of Honor...but that honor only exists if you are who you say you are.

www.history.navy.mil...
Which of these brave men are you?

The War in the Pacific started on a balmy December day in 1941. If you are who you say you are, you were no older than 19 when the raid was launched in April of '42.

It's one thing to lie about alien spaceships, it's totally another to spin tales of virtue in an event of such enormous magnitude.

So, yes, lets talk about history.
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posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 11:10 PM
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Originally posted by PaxVeritas
In your defense I have to say something.

My business deals in antiques and historical documents. One of my favorite niches is WW2 Era items and documents. I'm also a big fan of the era and it's culture, lingo, etc. Some people may not notice what I do but your written 'mannerisms' are in line with someone of your age who was involved in the military or of that era.

Little things you say pop out at me. They're sublime and may be unnoticed by the average person, but I'm picking up on them.

Just a thought.


I do appreciate your support.

As I have previously stated, I am not here to deceive anyone. Only to tell a story



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 11:19 PM
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Originally posted by AlonzoTyper
You may pick apart every piece of my story if you like. I honestly do not care, I'm simply trying to reference unusual things that occured during my lifetime.

First everyone wanted to know details on so called craft I had seen.

Now, everyone is going to pick apart my details of WWII and try to use that to take away any credibility. If I would have known World War II was going to be the focal point, I would have just taken the time to sit down and dictate every last detail so there would be no doubters.

Once again, my mistake.


Yes, sir, I would say you have made mistakes. Starting with your personal history about the war which we would assume would be a truthful, straightforward account without undue elaboration. If you cannot satisfy your story with the facts of that time, then we have no choice but to dismiss your entire story.

There are also problems with your details of the SR-71 and when it came to be first flown. But I see little need to get into that at this time. Actually, you have provided us with little more than rather typical UFO sightings that are a dime a dozen on ATS. Basically, I've found no real meat to your story so far. Now that you have some idea of our standards and expectations, we would like to hear more from you, but I expect it will be less.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by NuminousCosmos
 
I think you should study this history yourself. There are a lot more people in the pictures you linked to than names. Are you interested in finding this mans identity? For what reason may I ask? I don't think I want to post any of the stuff I know here. From now on I'll just observe others. Another thing, the assumption that we need evidence to prove things we see is a tactic used by many organizations to discredit others observations. It is used extensively by the sciences to prove nothing more than their superiority and it's concepts are passed on to new members. It is a control tactic.

edit on 13-2-2012 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 11:50 PM
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Alonzo, you are very obviously fabricating most if not all of your story.

FYI, there are a few ATS contributors, myself included, with bonafide aeronautical credentials who are much better versed in the history of military aviation than yourself, as your poorly researched attempt to spin your tale makes clear.

Coincidentally, there are also a couple of active ATS members who are actively involved with the roadrunners international folks and are well acquainted with a number of the surviving A-12/SR-71 crews so your claims of where you were and who you claim to have known can be easily vetted. (the YF-12 was a prototype succesor to the A-12, there were only three built and anyone with even a small interest in Kelly Johnsons masterwork would know that the A-12 came first)

I am not interested in correcting the multitude of inaccuracies in your post as we both know that your story is a fiction.

I will say that you blew your story early with your claim of operating carrier based B-25's.

There was a single mission famously led by Lieutenant colonel Jimmy Doolittle in early 1942 that saw the B-25 Mitchell operated from the USS Hornet CV-8 one way to the Chinese mainland via Tokyo. The Mitchells could be launched but could not be recovered, the deck was too small to accommodate landing a 30,000 lb aircraft with a 70 ft. wingspan.

All B-25 operations for the duration of the war, excluding the Doolittle raid were ground based and flown primarily by the USAAF with a very few being allocated to the USN which were operated almost exclusively by USMC flight crews from land.

No other U.S. CV, including the USS Hornet's Yorktown class sister ships (Yorktown (CV-5) and Enterprise (CV-6), operated a single B-25 sortie during the entire remainder of the war. Even the much larger Essex class CV's were incapable of supporting flight operations of an aircraft the size of a medium bomber. Among many other obstacles the aircraft elevators were too small to transport the aircraft which means there would be no way to clear the flight deck thus it was physically impossible for you to have done what you claim.

Sorry to pop your bubble but perhaps the next time you should consider choosing a more ambiguous topic, or in the least put a bit more effort into your homework.

If you want to push the issue I will be more than happy to engage in a more technical discussion.

No bad feelings, it was one of the better tries I have read in the last few months.

Better luck next time.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 11:53 PM
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First off, I care deeply about knowing the "truth." I am desperate to know if we have made contact with an extraterrestrial intelligence. A man claiming to have reversed-engineered an alien vehicle would have to have meticulous credentials and a coherent story that was self-supported. History says certain things about the Doolittle Raid, which he claims to have been a part of.



I was stationed on a “Yorktown” class carrier throughout much of the War. I was assigned as a radio operator on B-25’s
reply to post by rickymouse
 


You were on a Yorktown Class ship, of which there where only three: The Yorktown itself, the Enterprise, and the Hornet.

The Yorktown was lost in the battle of Midway.

The Hornet was the ship that the Doolittle raid launched on. This had to have been your ship. The Hornet was lost in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands on October 26, 1942.



You are correct, I was stationed on a Yorktown class for much of the War, but for the last year or so I did take part in the "Doolittle Raids" as you call it. You are very astute, and it is very humbling to be one who experienced the War, yet was so long ago, it is hard to set about stating every last detail


So, you transferred from the Hornet to the Enterprise...yet you also flew bombing mission in B-25s.

BUT since B-25s were not launched from carriers, that means you had to be based somewhere in the Pacific for a portion of the war.

Ship or Shore?

Do I have this right?



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 11:55 PM
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reply to post by Drunkenparrot
 


Beat me to it! Drats!



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 12:39 AM
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Originally posted by AlonzoTyper
You may pick apart every piece of my story if you like. I honestly do not care, I'm simply trying to reference unusual things that occured during my lifetime.

First everyone wanted to know details on so called craft I had seen.

Now, everyone is going to pick apart my details of WWII and try to use that to take away any credibility. If I would have known World War II was going to be the focal point, I would have just taken the time to sit down and dictate every last detail so there would be no doubters.

Once again, my mistake.


Don't let em get to you. We all still want to hear whatever it is you are kind enough to share with us.

At least I am anyways. This is the most interesting thing I've read in probably 2-3 years. If we close our minds to this we could be closing our minds to the truth.

So keep it coming AT I'll keep reading and posting.



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 12:50 AM
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I'd be interested in any details of the shape of the craft and any internal spaces.
edit on 14-2-2012 by thepixelpusher because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 12:58 AM
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That must've been pretty neat to have served on the big "E". Not many ships have a history as illustrious as hers.
My father in law was a B17 ball turret gunner from '43 to the end of the war. He told me he saw the "foos" as he called them but never got a close look.
You 2 could talk baling wire and fabric fortresses all night I'd bet.



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 01:14 AM
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For goodness sakes, people! You guys picking apart this man's story is ruining a perfectly good tale. True or not, what this man has told in both this and his massively long introduction thread is some of the most welcome, if not entertaining stories submitted on this site in quite a while. In these days of war, civil strife, economic breakdown, and hostile corporate takeovers of nations, it is quite imperative to not only listen to, but also learn from, the experiences and tales of our elders.

On the day of my grandfather's funeral, I found out that he was one of only 3 survivors in his platoon in the Assault on Omaha Beach. I realized at that point that there was so much about him that i never knew, and that i would never get the chance to ask him about it. I regret this, but i go on, seeking to learn where i may.

Whether on not "Mr Typer" is genuine is something that one has to decide for ones self. I do know that as time goes on, I get incidents and times mixed up, and i would bet my eye teeth that most of you guys out there do also. This doesn't make any of our experiences any less true, yet while Mr Typer is trying to recall events of 40-70 years ago, you guys are expecting him to recall precise dates and times. One of you is even insisting on Mr Typer in divulging his Identity! In this day and age of cyber warfare over privacy? All the threads on ATS about SOPA and all the the other acts of the government that we so happily complain about and you insist that this man reveal himself. Hypocrites!

Please, Mr Typer, regale us with your tales of yesteryear. Tell us of mysteries, of sea voyages. Tales of flights beyond our wildest dreams. Take us far from the troubles of today, if only for an instant.

Yes, Mr Typer. Please tell.



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 01:19 AM
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reply to post by NuminousCosmos
 


Actually, this is what he said.


I was stationed on a “Yorktown” class carrier throughout much of the War. I was assigned as a radio operator on B-25’s and flew on many successful missions.


The B25s, or PBJs, did have radio operators, and even though he was stationed on a carrier, does not mean that he could not have been part of a naval crew that flew on bombing missions that were not launched off the carrier. It also seems Alonzo isn't all that up on WW II history. Living through the War, and knowing a great deal of history about the war are two different things.

Maybe you guys can back off nitpicking the story to death, and let him tell the tale. Let's see if you don't mix up details when you are pushing 90.



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