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Mistery fog in the Milky Way

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posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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Planck, a billion-dollar European space telescope launched in May 2009, found “a mysterious haze of microwaves that presently defies explanation” during a scan of the centre of the Milky Way, the European Space Agency (ESA) said.


Well another confirmation we don't know so much of our own galaxy.

There are some possible explanations:


Several explanations have been offered, ranging from higher rates of supernovae in the galactic centre to the annihilation of so-called dark matter particles, ESA said in a press release.


Any ideas, ATS?

link




posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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This is what I love about space and astronomy. There's an unfathomable expanse out there, even in our own 'back yard' so to speak, with so many things that we simply have no clue about (yet).

Pure speculation based on absolutely nothing here, just my own imagination.. it'd be nice to think that perhaps its a vast cloud of organic matter, seeding interstellar debris with the stuff necessary to create life, or perhaps even some sort of living being, or a collection of living beings. Yes, yes, I know that's highly unlikely, but it's sort of an elegent thing to think about isn't it?



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:09 PM
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This is the link to the ESA article, much more detailed: ESA

Some more interesting info:




The new results are being presented this week at an international conference in Bologna, Italy, where astronomers from around the world are discussing the mission’s intermediate results. These results include the first map of carbon monoxide to cover the entire sky. Carbon monoxide is a constituent of the cold clouds that populate the Milky Way and other galaxies. Predominantly made of hydrogen molecules, these clouds provide the reservoirs from which stars are born.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:11 PM
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I wondered. About this my self, i also wondered. If space had a smell to it?



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by Monger
 





it'd be nice to think that perhaps its a vast cloud of organic matter, seeding interstellar debris with the stuff necessary to create life,


Are you maybe describing the process that here on Earth is called "God"??


But they say it's just a cloud of microwaves...more mundane explanation




posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by ShamilAbdullah
 


About 20 years ago I got a degree in Astronomy, and though I never worked as an astronomer, (studied many other things and was hooked for 20+ years to electronic engineering and then onto zoology and medical stuff), I am still keenly interested in astronomy. I find it so fascinating as to see how much that field has advanced in the last 20 years. Some fields in astronomy hasn't changed much, but fields like cosmology has changed so much, that I can barely follow it. That is the beauty about science, it keeps your mind sharp


(Of course, the same applies to electronic engineering and zoology as well). As an old professor of mine always said, the more you know, the more you know how little you actually know.

I will follow this with keen interest an see if I can get my hands on the more detailed parts of the study.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by Hundroid
 


It's the Jimmy Hendrix Nebula? Purple Haze! It could happen LOL

Seriously though, an increase in microwave radiation would require a source. Black holes supposedly cause increased paired particle ejection at the event horizon. This is an unlikely source I would think as even Hawking has discounted and denied the integrity of this, one of his past hypothesis on evaporating black holes. I would lean more towards increased gaseous "friction" in the acreation disc area of spinning black holes as a source but masked by a dark nebula (semi translucent) of some kind. Or if the matter jet were made up of antiparticles/dark matter and pointed in our general direction we might not be able to discern its boundaries properly, especially if the speed of the particle ejection was equal to the speed of expansion.

Who knows, some day we'll find out.

Cheers - Dave
edit on 2/13.2012 by bobs_uruncle because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 





As an old professor of mine always said, the more you know, the more you know how little you actually know.


Your old and wise professor must have studied the old greek phylosopher Socrates, who (according to Plato) said I know that I know nothing



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
reply to post by ShamilAbdullah
 


About 20 years ago I got a degree in Astronomy, and though I never worked as an astronomer, (studied many other things and was hooked for 20+ years to electronic engineering and then onto zoology and medical stuff), I am still keenly interested in astronomy. I find it so fascinating as to see how much that field has advanced in the last 20 years. Some fields in astronomy hasn't changed much, but fields like cosmology has changed so much, that I can barely follow it. That is the beauty about science, it keeps your mind sharp


(Of course, the same applies to electronic engineering and zoology as well). As an old professor of mine always said, the more you know, the more you know how little you actually know.

I will follow this with keen interest an see if I can get my hands on the more detailed parts of the study.
super cool guy, this stuff is indeed very interesting .. s+f old boy but



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:40 PM
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Originally posted by Monger
This is what I love about space and astronomy. There's an unfathomable expanse out there, even in our own 'back yard' so to speak, with so many things that we simply have no clue about (yet).

Pure speculation based on absolutely nothing here, just my own imagination.. it'd be nice to think that perhaps its a vast cloud of organic matter, seeding interstellar debris with the stuff necessary to create life, or perhaps even some sort of living being, or a collection of living beings. Yes, yes, I know that's highly unlikely, but it's sort of an elegent thing to think about isn't it?



Don't beat yourself up too much for thinking outside the box.


Actually, your thought process may not be too far off... afterall, the entire universe is "the stuff of life" right ? So the idea of organic matter (for lack of better terminology) is quite plausible indeed.




posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by bobs_uruncle
 


Dave thanks for your contribution. I am not an astronomer nor a professor (I studied economics) but I find anything related to space and space exploration so interesting....I regret for not having such a background as you have. Here at ATS I learned quite a lot and I'm very thankful to this forum and anybody who posts scientific articles. THANKS ATS!!



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by Hundroid
 


They've said that there's a dark alien cloud moving into our solar system that's affecting our sun and planets. I don't know if this is the same cloud you're talking about.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by Magnificient
 


Who are "they"??



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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Originally posted by ShamilAbdullah

I wondered. About this my self, i also wondered. If space had a smell to it?


Ive heard it smells like bacon. No joke.

One can hope.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by ShamilAbdullah

I wondered. About this my self, i also wondered. If space had a smell to it?


I remember reading a couple of years ago about the chemical compisition of one particular cloud out there.

Did a quick google - found this.


Galaxy's centre tastes of raspberries and smells of rum, say astronomers The hunt for chemicals in deep space that could seed life on other planets has yielded a large, fruity molecule



Astronomers searching for the building blocks of life in a giant dust cloud at the heart of the Milky Way have concluded that it tastes vaguely of raspberries.

Curiously, ethyl formate has another distinguishing characteristic: it also smells of rum.


Link

So, space tastes like raspberries and smells like rum. Though judging by your avatar, you wouldn't enjoy the rum smell quite as much as I would.


I kid, of course. I don't judge books by their cover... though frankly my friend your cover is.. well a little bit of a scary one
.
edit on 13-2-2012 by Monger because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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I wonder if there are any planets in the goldilocks zone in the haze; maybe catching some kind of beneficial acceleration from the particiles(if they aren't harmful) increasing the growth rate/evolutionary process of all life in the haze...



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by agentofchaos
 





I wonder if there are any planets in the goldilocks zone in the haze; maybe catching some kind of beneficial acceleration from the particiles(if they aren't harmful) increasing the growth rate/evolutionary process of all life in the haze...


I think you are going too far....the haze is made by microwaves.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by Hundroid

Planck, a billion-dollar European space telescope launched in May 2009, found “a mysterious haze of microwaves that presently defies explanation” during a scan of the centre of the Milky Way, the European Space Agency (ESA) said.


Well another confirmation we don't know so much of our own galaxy.

There are some possible explanations:


Several explanations have been offered, ranging from higher rates of supernovae in the galactic centre to the annihilation of so-called dark matter particles, ESA said in a press release.


Any ideas, ATS?

link



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 05:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by Hundroid

Planck, a billion-dollar European space telescope launched in May 2009, found “a mysterious haze of microwaves that presently defies explanation” during a scan of the centre of the Milky Way, the European Space Agency (ESA) said.


Well another confirmation we don't know so much of our own galaxy.

There are some possible explanations:


Several explanations have been offered, ranging from higher rates of supernovae in the galactic centre to the annihilation of so-called dark matter particles, ESA said in a press release.


Any ideas, ATS?

link



i am only speculation, SHOCK WAVE.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 05:52 PM
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SUDENNLY, a massive amount of jobs, a buildup of what i do not know. Maybe i can get a job there, but not likely. I will not say where, but they want engineers, physisist, administrative, truckers, geo marine biologists,security, the whole page on the internet. mn works.com is full of jobs now. I am not qualified for any of them. WHAT is going on? WHO KNOWS, maybe new tech in the midwest, interesting. I lost my job maybe i can get a job there.




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