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Anyone travelled India + Tibet?

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posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 02:07 PM
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I've been researching for some time now Esoteric teachings and I read that India is the place to visit to understand a great deal of Esoteric teachings and knowledge. Anyone been to India and Tibet and found it worth while? and which areas did you visit?




posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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when i get super powers i might fly over there. but really everything i want is right here, in-between my eyeballs



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 05:32 PM
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I did travel to India about 15 years ago for about 6 weeks. Had some snake charmer try and sell me a necklace for about $1000 near the Pink City. Down south I spent one night in the town with Sai Baba, one of the big gurus there. Heard a few strange stories with what he could do, but not really sure about it all. He did walk past and look at me as well as everyone else when going to one of his meetings, I was happy with that as there was a couple of thousand people there. Some people really get into it and stay their a while.

Sounds like there is a lot going on in India with a billion people and different teachings, so depends on what you are really into. If you ever get to the Taj Mahal try one of the 'Special Lassies' for quite an esoteric night.

I have not been to Tibet, but they seam like very hospitable and friendly people. At the moment with China, their religion and belief systems are under threat as the economic and political intervention is following the military invasion a while back. Considering the current situation, it maybe hard to find a good teacher, but it you do it will be life changing.



posted on Feb, 15 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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Yes, I've done both!

In 2006, I spent three weeks in India for a gut-wrenching "Globalization in Context" class. I also spent all summer of 2007 on a train in Asia; a month driving from Tibet to Kathmandu. You won't regret going to either India or Tibet, even if it costs $10,000. But make sure you're there for at least 2.5 weeks. Although I'd be wary of spending more than six weeks--these are stressful places (and I'm a war veteran).


Here are my general thoughts.

INDIA
.....So many colors and smells! And you've never seen poverty until you've been to India. Some places you might visit will literally be as they were 3,000 years ago. There's an unlimited amount of spirituality centers you can visit if that's what you'd like to explore--but make sure you do some thorough research, there's a ton of bull#. However, I think simply working with a good non-profit in a rural area helping people, will be far more intense and meaningful than hitting a yoga retreat.... (i.e. www.rideindia.org)


TIBET
There's no way to travel Tibet without being in a tourist group. It's Chinese law. Furthermore, it must be a tourist group with a company that has an office in China (my recommendation is Intrepid Travel). They've had many problems with tourists "causing problems," and it's not uncommon for the government to randomly cancel ALL tours of Tibet, without warning. So it's possible that you might have to spend your whole "Tibetan adventure" in a city like Xi'an or Chengdu. "Real Tibet" is bigger than the map says it is. You can start getting into the Himalayan foothills in Western Sichuan Provence where you will find "old Tibet." There is simply no way to write how the Tibetan wind and space feels--it's simply majestic. And some places make you feel as if you're walking on Mars. It can be a cold and lonely place--there is not much to do beyond drink Yak-milk tea, marvel at the scenery, tour monastery after monastery, and wear your winter coat (even in August).

I certainly had my most spiritual experiences in Tibet. It truly is a mystical place. One was at Mt Everest. It was cloudy and we were afraid that we'd not see the mountain at all. I stood in a small dirt street by the local little monastery waiting for my group, I was just starring in the mountain's direction, when at 7:30, the drums and horns in the monastery started to beat and flair next door. As the music echoed through the canyon, there, like a child slyly peaking through a think set of curtains, the clouds started to part and the peak ridge line of Mt. Everest glimmered through the mist! Magic.



It's a big world and fun to get lost in! But be careful, you can get too lost--and you won't fully come back... and this is only something that I've realized years later.
good luck!
edit on 15-2-2012 by RussHaywood because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2012 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by RussHaywood
Yes, I've done both!

In 2006, I spent three weeks in India for a gut-wrenching "Globalization in Context" class. I also spent all summer of 2007 on a train in Asia; a month driving from Tibet to Kathmandu. You won't regret going to either India or Tibet, even if it costs $10,000. But make sure you're there for at least 2.5 weeks. Although I'd be wary of spending more than six weeks--these are stressful places (and I'm a war veteran).


Here are my general thoughts.

INDIA
.....So many colors and smells! And you've never seen poverty until you've been to India. Some places you might visit will literally be as they were 3,000 years ago. There's an unlimited amount of spirituality centers you can visit if that's what you'd like to explore--but make sure you do some thorough research, there's a ton of bull#. However, I think simply working with a good non-profit in a rural area helping people, will be far more intense and meaningful than hitting a yoga retreat.... (i.e. www.rideindia.org)


TIBET
There's no way to travel Tibet without being in a tourist group. It's Chinese law. Furthermore, it must be a tourist group with a company that has an office in China (my recommendation is Intrepid Travel). They've had many problems with tourists "causing problems," and it's not uncommon for the government to randomly cancel ALL tours of Tibet, without warning. So it's possible that you might have to spend your whole "Tibetan adventure" in a city like Xi'an or Chengdu. "Real Tibet" is bigger than the map says it is. You can start getting into the Himalayan foothills in Western Sichuan Provence where you will find "old Tibet." There is simply no way to write how the Tibetan wind and space feels--it's simply majestic. And some places make you feel as if you're walking on Mars. It can be a cold and lonely place--there is not much to do beyond drink Yak-milk tea, marvel at the scenery, tour monastery after monastery, and wear your winter coat (even in August).

I certainly had my most spiritual experiences in Tibet. It truly is a mystical place. One was at Mt Everest. It was cloudy and we were afraid that we'd not see the mountain at all. I stood in a small dirt street by the local little monastery waiting for my group, I was just starring in the mountain's direction, when at 7:30, the drums and horns in the monastery started to beat and flair next door. As the music echoed through the canyon, there, like a child slyly peaking through a think set of curtains, the clouds started to part and the peak ridge line of Mt. Everest glimmered through the mist! Magic.



It's a big world and fun to get lost in! But be careful, you can get too lost--and you won't fully come back... and this is only something that I've realized years later.
good luck!
edit on 15-2-2012 by RussHaywood because: (no reason given)


I wasn't aware of that about Tibet, so there is literally no way of touring it without being part of an organized group?

Did you stay at a monastery at all during your stay there? Tibet is more fascinating to me than India, but I want to visit some of the ancient Indian locations and look at some of the old locations that are mentioned in Hindu texts and Indian mythology.
edit on 15-2-2012 by TheGreatest because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2012 @ 09:14 PM
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I did some voulintary work in India back in the dark ages building houses it was awesome. India is an amazing place.



posted on Feb, 16 2012 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by TheGreatest
 



Yep, you must be apart of a group. Although there could be educational opportunities where you could be "more independent"... but that seems unlikely. There truly is an unjust level of oppression in China that surprises our Western senses. You need an additional entry Visa to even enter Tibet, and there are county by county road checks to make sure that you are where you're supposed to be.

We never got to stay in a monastery with the other monks. Too disruptive (and nobody knows English). But we were always nearby a monastery. My favtorite and the experience closest to what you might like, was staying in Samye. There we lived in a medieval style fort where you poop over the walls, there's a well for water in central court yard, and goats sneak into your second floor "rooms" if you're taking a nap and not careful!



Like I said, both India and Tibet are excellent places and worth the effort. But the Chinese government does make it intentionally hard to stay and learn about Tibet. One option that might be a compromise, is to visit the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, India! It's in the Indian foothills of the Himalayan mountains, and the Indian religious sites would be accessible everywhere (although I thought south India was the most colorful and fun)



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:11 AM
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No experience for Tibet, but I did go to India like about a year ago. MAN! It is not worth it.
I dont know if I am getting too biased or what, but my experience was a total ruin. It was a waste of time, investment and everything.
I visited some of the suburban cities too. The major cities are much developed but as you move to outskirts, it is filthy and yucky.
In short, I would say from experience, Try somewhere else.



posted on Jul, 30 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 10 2012 @ 10:54 PM
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According to me, in India there are lots of places available, South Indian city are beautiful.

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