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E-waste. A Massive Problem In Africa!

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posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 12:32 PM
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Hi ATS.

I just read a heartwrenching article.
i was totally unaware of this, call me ignorant but i truely didn't know this.

so i thought i'd share this with fellow ATS'ers.

our life of luxury has huge negative effects on a continent that is struggling allready.

this really touched my heart.

E-Waste




In the five countries studied in the report "Where are WEEE in Africa?" (Benin, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Liberia, and Nigeria), between 650,000 and 1,000,000 tons of domestic E-waste are generated each year, which need to be managed to protect human health and the environment in the region. The report sheds light on current recycling practices and on socio-economic characteristics of the E-waste sector in West Africa. It also provides the quantitative data on the use, import and disposal of electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in the region. The report draws on the findings of national E-waste assessments carried out in the five countries from 2009 to 2011.


they're so full of E-Waste they're starting to use monitors for bridges.



burning the cables for precious metals.
filling the lungs of the most vulnerable with toxic gasses.
not only that, also polluting their air and drinking water.



read the rest of the report here.

major findings from the report:


In Ghana in 2009, investigators found that around 70% of all EEE imports were used EEE; 30% of second-hand imports were estimated to be non-functioning (therefore E-waste), producing about 40,000 tons of E-waste in 2010.



Field investigations in Benin and Côte d’Ivoire have shown that about half of the imported used EEE is actually non-functional and non-repairable, thus defined as import of E-waste.



An analysis of 176 containers of two categories of used EEE imported into Nigeria, conducted from March to July 2010, revealed that more than 75% of all containers came from Europe, approximately 15% from Asia, 5% from African ports (mainly Morocco) and 5% from North America. A similar distribution could be observed in Ghana, where 85% of used EEE imports originated in Europe, 4% in Asia, 8% in North America, and 3% from other destinations.



The UK is the dominant exporting country to Africa for both new and used EEE, followed with large gaps by France and Germany. Nigeria is the most dominant African importing country for new and used EEE, followed by Ghana.



Altogether it is estimated that during the past few years, at least 250,000 tons of E-waste per annum "illegally" entered the five selected West African countries. "This number is comparable to the total amount of E-waste generated in small European countries such as Belgium or the Netherlands, and equates to approximately 5% of all E-waste generated in the European Union", says Schluep.






after reading and watching all this, i feel guilty.

guilty in a weird way..

guilty for having a computer, iphone, ipad, LED-tv etc.

the world is so UNBALANCED.
edit on 13-2-2012 by kn0wh0w because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 12:51 PM
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Africa is soo rich in natural resources... I don't understand why that continent is soo far behind. It's a shame really.
The resources are there, why isn't there pro active recycling programs? Are they capable to do anything by themselves with out the west intervening? I doubt it. I mean, all that stuff is being dumped there, these countries have governments that can put an end to this illegal dumping or they can take the 'garbage' and recycle it and turn it into profit to benefit their nations. Ugh. Most of Africa will always be third world if everything is left up to them.
edit on 13-2-2012 by kimish because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by kn0wh0w
 


Im confused why I should feel guilty. Just WHO is facilitating the dumping of this electronic equipment onto Africa? Surely this is handled by African corporations?

Definitely a sad affair, but Im more concerned with American landfills full of mercury and cadmium and lead, than with African landfills full of the same, coming from Britain. Once America starts running a clean ship, and mercury is no longer contaminating my own water supply, Ill start fretting about Africa burning plastic wire cables to get to the copper.

We need to help ourselves first, before we can effectively help anyone else.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by kn0wh0w
 

IMHO the people to blame for this are our governments. Who the hell suggested we dump all our waste in Africa? When you burst the bubble you will find that it is a systematic thing. Hospital "waste" (read bloody bandages, things removed during operations and everything in between) gets put in containers and shipped to...Brazil I think the last one was discovered, when trying illegally to offload it. Thankfully the Brazilians stopped it and shipped it back. I've seen videos of little boys burning the (toxic) plastic off electrical cables just to reclaim the copper (quite valuable) in said cables. (I think that was in the Congo but in any case, some poor African country). Meanwhile, our governments charge us royally for "correct disposal" of said waste. It's all a dirty scam and the buck should stop with "us".

ETA It's ether Nigeria or Ethiopia. Our supposedly environmentally destroyed computer hard drives find their way to second hand markets there where people then try to recover whatever data they can find and then use that to do scams, money stuff and suchlike. It's just appalling.


I see you have a vid of the children burning stuff to reclaim the inner metal contents. Nasty nasty nasty...
edit on 13/2/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by CaticusMaximus
 


Thank you!

I don't understand why people are soo up in arms over things like this when we have problems just as severe on our own soil. The African nations have governments. If there governments don't help them that is something that they need to address themselves. In the meantime, while people suffer in our country, we are shipping resources and money to other countries when in reality we could benefit more from OUR resources and OUR money here at home.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by CaticusMaximus
 




Im confused why I should feel guilty.


i never said you have to feel guilty.

i do.

by looking at these pictures, reading this and realising how much better my life actually is.

that is why i feel guilty.



Surely this is handled by African corporations?


No.

a lot of this stuff gets (illegaly) shipped to Africa disguised as '2nd hand goods'.

but a lot of this stuff is broken and unrepairable, leaving them with the mess.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by CaticusMaximus
 




We need to help ourselves first, before we can effectively help anyone else.


the world is 'helping' them.

by giving lots of chariy money to governments we helped install.

plutocracy's.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:13 PM
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There poor so we can be rich.

I should have just air mailed by old CRT monitor to Africa if i had known about this, the bloody council aint gonna lift it.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by kn0wh0w
 


I see, the broken things shipped are the problem.

This seems like a trade issue. Both sides are complicit in this situation in my view. The exporters to Africa shouldnt be being deceitful, but the Importers in Africa just dumping all the waste seems like a lazy way to deal with the problem.

Im sure it all boils to down to its cheaper that way, for boths sides, though.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by Ixtab
There poor so we can be rich.

I should have just air mailed by old CRT monitor to Africa if i had known about this, the bloody council aint gonna lift it.


i hope this was sarcasm.

if not you're on heartless human being.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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Actually this is a big opportunity for them...
There are all kinds of gold platinum, and other precious meteals in these relics as well as copper aluminium, and other recoverable usefull industrial ingredients...
They should set up a giant reclamation factory and they could provide employment that is clean and safe as well as increase the countries exports....



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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reply to post by CaticusMaximus
 




This seems like a trade issue. Both sides are complicit in this situation in my view. The exporters to Africa shouldnt be being deceitful, but the Importers in Africa just dumping all the waste seems like a lazy way to deal with the problem.


you summed it up pretty nicely.

but it's always the 'ordinairy' people that wind up with the crap.

a continent that has been raped, pillaged and exploited doesn't deserve this, nor does any other continent for that matter.

we should start cleaning up our act.

we humans are pretty lazy about that.



and not just in Africa.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by stirling
 


They have all the resources necessary to do all of that but unfortunately the majority of the people there in one way or another are incompetent. The proof is in the pudding, so to speak.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by stirling
 


Thats a great idea, and would be wonderful for them, if not the objective were to profit monetarily.

Reclaimation takes a lot of work, and from a capitalist stand point, it would not turn a monetary profit for the individuals who owned the corporations, so it would never get off the ground.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 02:10 PM
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Can't really blame this on the US, coming in at a mere 5%.
I'm sure that stat really disappointed the US bashers.

Cant really blame this on the big corporations either because they are only supplying what we all demand.
Truth is, everyone is to blame for this,

Crossroads!
Either we keep embracing technology or we put our money our mouth is and stop buying the latest and greatest gadgets.

We can all say we will give up our favorite electonic device, but how long before the withdrawals kick in?

Easier said than done.

We can all revert to using smoke signals as a mode of communication but even that pollutes the skies.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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I find it very difficult to listen to anything Green Peace has to say.



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 02:34 PM
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Originally posted by TFCJay
I find it very difficult to listen to anything Green Peace has to say.


oh the pictures and the video are not real enough for you?



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by kn0wh0w
 


No



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 03:23 PM
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Originally posted by TFCJay
reply to post by kn0wh0w
 


No




much?



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by kn0wh0w
 




No.

Nice picture though. Thanks.



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