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Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service

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posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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These changes will take effect on March 1, 2012.

www.google.com...


Our privacy principles remain unchanged. And we’ll never sell your personal information or share it without your permission (other than rare circumstances like valid legal requests).


Transparency Report




Transparency is a core value at Google.


Is the number of “users/accounts specified” by user data requests a comprehensive count of the total number of users about whom governments have requested data?




No, the statistics primarily cover requests in criminal matters. We can’t always be sure that a request necessarily relates to a criminal investigation, however, so there are likely a small number of requests that fall outside of this category. That said, there are several reasons why the numbers of “users/accounts specified” by user data requests may be over-inclusive or under-inclusive. For example, in some instances the same Gmail account may be specified in several different requests for user data. Each distinct request that we receive would be added to the total, as we have not figured out a satisfactory method for de-duplicating account or user names when tracking requests. On the other hand, we might also receive a request for a user or account that doesn't exist at all. In that case, we would still add both the request and the non-existent account to the total.




As a company we feel it is our responsibility to ensure that we maximize transparency around the flow of information related to our tools and services. We believe that more information means more choice, more freedom and ultimately more power for the individual.





We've created Government Requests to show the number of government inquiries for information about users and requests to remove content from our services. We hope this step toward greater transparency will help in ongoing discussions about the appropriate scope and authority of government requests


What is a content removal request?




Governments make content removal requests to remove information from Google products, such as blog posts or YouTube videos.


How many of these requests did you comply with?




The "user data requests" numbers reflect the number of requests we received about the users of our services and products from government agencies like local and federal police and, for the period from July-December 2010 and onward, the number of requests to which we responded in whole or in part. When we receive a request for user information, we review it carefully and only provide information within the scope and authority of the request. We may refuse to produce information or try to narrow the request in some cases.





We would like to be able to share more information, but it's not an easy matter. The requests we receive for user data come from a variety of government agencies with different legal authorities and different forms of requests. They don't follow a standard format or necessarily seek the same kinds of information. A single request may ask for several types of data but be valid only for one type and not for another; in those cases, we disclose only the information we believe we are legally required to share. Given all this complexity, it's a difficult task to categorize and quantify these requests in a way that adds meaningful transparency, but we may do so in the future.



Laws surrounding these issues vary by country, and the requests reflect the legal context of a given jurisdiction. We hope this tool will be helpful in discussions about the appropriate scope and authority of government requests.





During the period that Google's joint venture operated google.cn, its search results were subject to censorship pursuant to requests from government agencies responsible for Internet regulation. Chinese officials consider censorship demands to be state secrets, so we cannot disclose any information about content removal requests for the two reporting periods from July 2009 to June 2010.





United StatesWe received a request from a local law enforcement agency to remove YouTube videos of police brutality, which we did not remove. Separately, we received requests from a different local law enforcement agency for removal of videos allegedly defaming law enforcement officials. We did not comply with those requests, which we have categorized in this Report as defamation requests.





United KingdomThe number of content removal requests we received increased by 71% compared to the previous reporting period.





ItalyWe received a request from the Central Police in Italy for removal of a YouTube video that criticized Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi and simulated his assassination with a gun at the end of the video. We removed the video for violating YouTube’s Community Guidelines





ArgentinaThe courts in Argentina issued two orders that sought the removal of every search result mentioning a particular individual's name in association with a certain category of content. The number of search results at issue well exceeds 100,000 results. We did not attempt to approximate the number of individual items of content that might be encompassed by those two court orders. Google appealed those orders.





GermanyA substantial number of German removal requests resulted from court orders that related to defamation in search results. Approximately 11% of the German removal requests are related to pro-Nazi content or content advocating denial of the Holocaust, both of which are illegal under German law.





CanadaWe received a request from a Canadian politician to remove a blog criticizing his policies. We declined to remove the blog because it did not violate our policies.



We hope this step toward greater transparency will help in ongoing discussions about the appropriate scope and authority of government requests.


What information is covered by the new Privacy Policy?




Our new Privacy Policy applies to all information stored with Google on March 1, 2012 and to information we collect after that date.


Is Google collecting more information about me?




No, Google is not collecting more data about you. Our new policy simply makes it clear that we use data to refine and improve your experience on Google across the services you sign in to use. This is something we’ve already been doing and we plan to continue doing in the future so we can provide a simpler, more intuitive experience.


Does this change mean Google plans to disclose information about me publicly?




Absolutely not. You still have choice and control in what you share. Our new policy simply makes it clear that when you’re signed in, we use data to refine and improve your own personal experience on Google. We’re making our policy simpler with this change and we’re trying to be upfront about it.





we’re trying to be upfront about it.




editby]edit on 12-2-2012 by ZIPMATT because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-2-2012 by ZIPMATT because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-2-2012 by ZIPMATT because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-2-2012 by ZIPMATT because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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thanks for breaking it down like that , most people see a page with lots of words , walk away lol.

I hope it can ease some of the google fears lol. i was surprised at the number of requests google recieves. I thought it would be alot with some of the gloom stories you hear about google. But it was pretty low . I guess they are not really after us ..


or they just put their pipeline in between your computer and google! so the info is already jacked before google even knows what happened haha .

No wonder its low ! lol j/k


Thanks for sharing



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 06:12 PM
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does anyone know if ebay is in any way connected to google?


and for the german "removal" requests - a lot of normal american documentarys get blocked under the label "not allowed in germany - hate etc." also a lot of original footage from WWII is not available with a german IP - where is the antisemitism or hate (its really not true, even under the german law) in it - THIS IS CENSORSHIP!!!!
edit on 12-2-2012 by Hessdalen because: mindcontrol



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 06:18 PM
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reply to post by seedofchucky
 


the statistics primarily cover requests in criminal matters. We can’t always be sure that a request necessarily relates to a criminal investigation, however, so there are likely a small number of requests that fall outside of this category.



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 06:42 PM
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reply to post by ZIPMATT
 



likely a small number of requests that fall outside of this category


and now define "small" in the context of google ...



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by Hessdalen
 


we’re trying to be upfront about it



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 07:08 PM
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We can’t always be sure



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 07:21 PM
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Well thanks for posting that...

But i'm sticking with Google...

Someone is always watching anyways...

At least Google is telling me that they are...

Honorable really if you look at it right...



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 07:29 PM
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reply to post by EvolEric
 

The requests we receive for user data come from a variety of government agencies with different legal authorities and different forms of requests. They don't follow a standard format or necessarily seek the same kinds of information.
The "user data requests" numbers reflect the number of requests we received about the users of our services and products from government agencies like local and federal
edit on 12-2-2012 by ZIPMATT because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by ZIPMATT
 


I knew google would one day speak as one of us.

Bah humbug to you google. Tyranny and greed are your secret names. Oppression and power are your tools. Maniacs and fools speak your thoughts. I cast thee out into no adsense for you. stick that in your googleanalytic and process it.





posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by ZIPMATT
 




You work for google?

I love google... and there induction into the internet was the best thing since sliced cheese in my opinion...



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by mainidh
 


I think you are confused
I think you meant to say Apple... butyou mistakenly said Google
Itunes is quite the Nazi




posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 09:16 PM
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I don't trust anyone doing things behind my back for my own good--I don't care how innocuous they may paint it to be.

But that's a little bit beside the point. I recently learned that Google "knows" you because of all the information they gather on you, and they "personalize" search results. I don't want my search results personalized. I want them as absolutely "raw" as they can be presented. I will make up my own mind whether they relate to what I'm looking for. (I had been wondering for several years why search results had become so "homogenized.")

Anyway, I've been using Startpage for some time now, and I'm much more satisfied with the results. Google and Facebook and every other information gatherer/aggregator can go to hell....



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 11:02 PM
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Originally posted by EvolEric
reply to post by mainidh
 


I think you are confused
I think you meant to say Apple... butyou mistakenly said Google
Itunes is quite the Nazi



When google was in it's infancy it was the best search engine. Over the years they have accumulated so much and changed their policies so much that now all they care about is revenue.

I've never used itunes for anything, not any apple products.


but I do know google are only after one thing, and if you dare speak out against them where they can strike back, you feel the entire force of their stick...

People were complaining on google forums about not being able to turn off personal advertising, despite the option being there to disable it. It would still find keywords in their Gmail and target them with adverts on the top of their gmail web.

I let them know how google works, revenue is all they care about, just look at the google image search, or all the changes to the search engine that are counter intuitive and then look for people complaining that they do not listen to anyone... and you'll find dozens if not more threads on their own forums of people sick to the back teeth of having changes forced onto them with advertising websites listing first in the results, or things that no one asked for that inhibit a fluid use of their features, and the chirping crickets from google staff is overwhelming.

But I say how every user of google is nothing more than a revenue raising unpaid employee for google, and that you cannot tell google otherwise as they will simply not listen, and BANG... no gmail, no youtube, and all my accounts terminated.

Ohhh they're obnoxious in their behavior. And they know there is nothing anyone can do. They have their fingers in too many pies. and to not use them is to limit your internet experience, but the alternative, is a little more than I'll put up with.

duckduckgo suits me fine. and I can live without youtube if need be. Certainly do not need gmail.

so I sail in uncharted waters on the internet, so be it.
it beats having to pass inspection at every port.



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