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If a heavy planet from solar system will dissapear what will happen to gravity and speed of Earth?

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posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:05 AM
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Scientist say that in a very distant past of our solar system,we use to have 5 heavy planets.One of them'v got ejected by the gravity of Jupiter.


TextWhat did the early solar system look like? A new study has come out conjecturing that there used to be five giant planets in our solar system, and one got ejected by Jupiter through its gravitational influence. It’s an interesting bit of research, based on computer modeling. It’s pretty well established that the outer planets have moved around a bit since the solar system formed, with a possibility that Uranus and Neptune even swapped places! But the models have a hard time explaining how this could’ve happened without Jupiter totally messing up the inner solar system. The models seem to indicate the orbits of Mars and Earth would not look at all as they do today if this were the case. Using the k
source(blogs.discovermagazine.com...

Maybe this is how Earth came to current balance making life possible.


Let's take Jupiter for example.What if Jupiter will migrate out from our Solar system.The entire balance of the planets will be affected.Earth may be affected in terms of the rotational speed , gravity or the tilt axis of rotation.

Or maybe the oceans will disappear.


TextTidal forces could squeeze out planetary water February 9, 2012 By Charles Q. Choi Enlarge This artist's rendition depicts a Neptune-sized planet in orbit around Gliese 436. Most likely tidally locked, the planet only turns one face toward its sun. Credit: NASA Alien planets might experience tidal forces powerful enough to remove all their water, leaving behind hot, dry worlds like Venus, researchers said.
source(www.physorg.com...

Rotation earth orbit around the sun would be irreparably affected as of the other planets,but we don't know in what proportion.

Will our planet freeze, or we will not have night?

How do you think Earth will be affected in such a case scenario?




posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:14 AM
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Depends on which planet, you'd have to be more specific. If its beyond the asteroid belt say past Jupiter.....doubt it would have any real great effect for very long....everything would adjust yes. But distance to the earth and sun is key when you speak of this type of thing.

That and mass also plays a role in gravity and how much is effected throughout the solar system.
edit on 10-2-2012 by BooKrackers because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:18 AM
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reply to post by BooKrackers
 



Depends on which planet, you'd have to be more specific
It's clear if Jupiter will migrate out of Solar system Earth will be affected,but if let's say Pluto or Venus will be ejected I wonder what the effect will be.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:23 AM
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reply to post by BooKrackers
 



That and mass also plays a role in gravity and how much is effected throughout the solar system.
Planets are tied together by gravity together with the sun which means even if Mercury would disappear the entire solar system would suffer.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:34 AM
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Originally posted by diamondsmith
reply to post by BooKrackers
 



That and mass also plays a role in gravity and how much is effected throughout the solar system.
Planets are tied together by gravity together with the sun which means even if Mercury would disappear the entire solar system would suffer.


Perhaps, yet again the effect would be negligible over time. The solar system is a self sustaining organism. The sun is really the only thing keeping everything here. For what you speak of to happen it would have to be a disturbance with a pull of gravity almost equal to the size of the planet it's effecting....and it would have to be close.

Noting that the planets/planetoids that are here have been in a stable orbit for a very long time...it'd have to be one hell of a disturbance to alter that. Your right though in the respect that they do all pull and push on one another. The moon is a fine example of this in regards to the sun and the tidal surges....yet that's merely a small example.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:38 AM
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reply to post by BooKrackers
 



The moon is a fine example of this in regards to the sun and the tidal surges....yet that's merely a small example.
You mean if even the moon will migrate from Earth the solar system will be affected or only the Earth!



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:53 AM
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reply to post by BooKrackers
 



Perhaps, yet again the effect would be negligible over time
Could be as the solar system has formed in billion of years.


TextIn roughly 5 billion years, the Sun will cool and expand outward to many times its current diameter (becoming a red giant), before casting off its outer layers as a planetary nebula, and leaving behind a stellar remnant known as a white dwarf. In the far distant future, the gravity of passing stars gradually will whittle away at the Sun's retinue of planets. Some planets will be destroyed, others ejected into interstellar space. Ultimately, over the course of trillions of years, it is likely that the Sun will be left with none of the original bodies in orbit around it.[
source(en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 10:10 AM
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You have to find out how much is f.a. Jupiter affecting us now. Our main keeper on orbit is the Sun so I think nothing huge would happen.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by PapagiorgioCZ
 



Our main keeper on orbit is the Sun so I think nothing huge would happen.
The sun as the other planets because all counts,if one will be ejected we don't know how the entire solar system will be affected 'cause never had it before.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 10:27 AM
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If Jupiter gets ejected, everything behind Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, even Pluto would shift a bit closer. I think for Earth to get affected, it would either have to be planets in front of it, or Mars.

Saturn might also lose it's asteroid belt ring and send it toward the closest mass
~



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 10:31 AM
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reply to post by luciddream
 



I think for Earth to get affected, it would either have to be planets in front of it, or Mars.
Planets are all interconnected and tied together by invisible lines, so Earth likely would be affected one way or the other.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:32 PM
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The effects of gravity are fairly well known - this thread at Stargazer discusses how much effect Jupiter currently has on Earth - it is about 3/1,000,000 (3 parts in 1 milloin) the effect of the Moon.

Possibly hte main effect of Jupiter on Earth is that it effectively shields the inner solar system from a lot of debris that might otherwise pass through - but hen it's gravity might also cause some debris to peturb out of orbit - I'm not sure which is considerd the more important!!

But in terms of its gravitaitonal effect on Earth's orbit or tides - if it suddenly went away only science would notice the few millimeters extra the earth would speed up or slow down or the few micrometres the tides would differ by.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by diamondsmith
reply to post by BooKrackers
 



The moon is a fine example of this in regards to the sun and the tidal surges....yet that's merely a small example.
You mean if even the moon will migrate from Earth the solar system will be affected or only the Earth!



Only the earth would be effected



posted on Feb, 11 2012 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 



Possibly hte main effect of Jupiter on Earth is that it effectively shields the inner solar system from a lot of debris that might otherwise pass through
it might be a domino effect and all the planets in turn would change various parameters.



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