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Compact Florescent Light Bulbs Gone Wild!

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posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by nkultra
 
more ammo for me...thanks I've been trying to convince my spouse to get rid of them.I swear they cause depression and headaches,not to mention other side effects.

I preferr to not use lighting at night if I can help it,if needed I use a small lamp with a regular bulb in it,I actually feel the difference.




posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by baddmove
 
I think he would have really proven his point by breaking the light bulb! it would have been fun to watch them all scatter.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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It seems funny that the cfl was being filmed just as it burnt up, the way it seemed to fail it would appear the cfl had been damaged before being turn on. If the glass seal has been broken they will burn in this manner.

Florescent light have been around for ever nothing new, broke them all the time as a kid, now these are tiny ones with internal ballast.

The LED are aways off and cost to much, so deal with it, I'm still waiting for the flying cars.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 02:38 PM
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The old incandescent bulb was quite prone to exploding destructively, and often launching the spear-like element like a missile. LED's are the way to go, and there are newer ones now, with a more ambient light akin to the old type bulbs or the totally unreliable halogens. The white LED's just did not cut the mustard, but these newer ones are pretty good, and are as cheap as chips in the UK at least.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 02:59 PM
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Originally posted by Screwed
I can't wait to see how much pollution there will be after 20 years worth of these things filling up our landfills.


Hopefully you're aware that you recycle CPF bulbs, you don't throw them away. You can take them to any Lowes or Home Depot for recycling. But, here's some food for thought courtesy of a continuing education seminar I took (to maintain my architectural license credentials). Mercury is released into the atmosphere as a byproduct of the creation of electricity (mainly through burning of coal). It is true that CPF bulbs do contain mercury, but they save a tremendous amount of energy over incandescent bulbs. So much so in fact that even if they were all thrown away when used up and broke in landfills, there would still be less total net mercury released than is released in generating the energy to drive the equivalent incandescent bulb.

We've been using CPFs in our home for many (10+) years now and have never had a problem. They seem to last forever, we have over 40 bulbs in our home and I can only remember replacing 4 or 5 that have burned out over the years. I was constantly replacing bulbs (2 or 3 a month) before we went to CPFs.

To the person asking why LEDs aren't more popular, it's quite simple. Cost. They are much more expensive than CPFs.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by TWILITE22
 
Glad I could help



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:13 PM
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Is there any reason to believe that some of those faulty and low standard CF(whatever) bulbs, are in fact very low quality put on the market by those concerned businessmen who constantly search for ways to get you really cheap stuff?

There are several cases in Denmark where we get really cruddy quality light bulbs for a low price. And as it is with so many other things - you get what you pay for.

I've had the less cheap quality in my low energy house (except the kitchen) for more than 10 years. Not one has failed me yet.

The only thing that has failed was the power supplies to my first set of six 12 Volt halogen lights (in the kitchen). It burst into flames and luckily my wife heard the sizzling noise and went investigating.
I bought a new - over capacity - power supply and it is still running after 15 years.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:17 PM
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Posting because I had this happen too 6 months back.

The CFL bulb in my rooms overhead fixture started lightly blinking, within 60 sec it started popping and was smoking by the time I got the switch off and bulb out. This was over 2 min.... what if I had left the house for food or a cigg break!



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:25 PM
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I have them in every socket in my house too, been using them for more than 10 years!

I leave 1 on 24 / 7 and THAT particular lamp averages about 8000 hours before it fails.

Not quite like the one in the video, but yeah, It's usually the power supply that fries.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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In California they have outlawed the old kind and are phasing them out starting with the highest wattage ones first. People are hording them.

59 watt light

One thing I know about the CFL is that because of the power factor, they don't save that much power as capacitance has to be added to the circuit to balance the load. So as far as your electric bill, yes, them make it lower. But as far as consuming electricity, they are not as good as people think.

Source


The power factor (PF) is the ratio of real power vs. apparent power of a system. Electric appliances use Real power (measured in Watt, W) to produce work, for instance in the form of heat and light produced by a light bulb. Apparent power (measured in Volt Ampere, VA) is the product of voltage and current and is a rather abstract thing for most people (except for electrical engineers).

Apparent power is stored by inductors and capacitors in an electric circuit during each cycle, for instance in the electromagnetic field of a vaccum cleaner motor, and returned to the source in the same cycle (the generator in the power plant). The AC frequency in the United States is 60 Hz, so this cycle happens 60 times per second. Apparent power is not ‘consumed’ by appliances, and luckily, because it swings in and out of your house in each cycle, the net result on your residential electric meter is zero. Utilities do not charge residential customers for apparent power. However, apparent power requires additional current flowing across the grid, and thus creates distribution losses in transformers and power lines in the form of heat. Therefore, utilities have great interest in minimizing apparent power in the grid. They require industrial plants and other large consumers of electric power to take measures for compensating their power factor, or if that is not possible, will charge a penalty.

While incandescent bulbs have a power factor close to 1, and can be considered an almost ideal load, the electric circuit in a compact fluorecent bulb (also called ballast) causes apparent power and lowers the power factor.



For an 11W CFL purchased at Ikea (a 40W-equivalent bulb), I measured a real power of 9W, an apparent power of 14VA, and a power factor of 0.65.

So what does this mean? It means that almost 50% more current is drawn from the grid to light up this bulb than it can convert into light and heat. But you don’t pay for this extra power, because it is not consumed. It oscillates back and forth between the generator and the (inductive) load. The apparent power causes distribution losses, but because there are so many different loads on the electric grid at any given time, the effect gets lost in the grand scheme of things, and even for a single residence the overall power factor is likely to be close to 1, despite a few CFL bulbs. If every residential customer in the country replaced all incandescent bulbs with CFLs at once, this situation could change. Electric utilities, sensing an opportunity for a new revenue streams, may begin to charge residential customers for apparent power at some point in the future.


ECN Story here


The Better Use of Light Bulbs Act (BULB) has been defeated in the House of Representatives. BULB would have amended the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, thereby staying the incandescent ban. But it was not to be. With no further challenges, the Edison Lightbulb faces mandatory retirement in January 2012.


K
edit on 10-2-2012 by kawika because: added link

edit on 10-2-2012 by kawika because: add text

edit on 10-2-2012 by kawika because: added link



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by smurfy
The old incandescent bulb was quite prone to exploding destructively, and often launching the spear-like element like a missile. LED's are the way to go, and there are newer ones now, with a more ambient light akin to the old type bulbs or the totally unreliable halogens. The white LED's just did not cut the mustard, but these newer ones are pretty good, and are as cheap as chips in the UK at least.


I beg to differ with you sir, exploding destructively eh?
Well I am way over 50 years old and never has a "old incandescent bulb" attacked me or my parents or my wife....
Good try though on the fear market, Fear sells well when facts don't.

here have a read and let me know what you think?


I am not trying to be a smart ass just wishing that people would read a thread all the way before posting questionable information.
Regards, Iwinder

Link
www.dailymail.co.uk...
edit on 10-2-2012 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by nkultra
 

Yeah I've seen a few do that by now. Don't worry it's just a crappily made ac converter in the base of the bulb and the smell is burnt plastic from wires and what not. I've found it's usually the cheap ones that do this and the bulb itself is a little loose in the ones that do. Buy something like a Sylvania next time, the extra two bucks is worth it so your house doesn't burn down. Also always check the fit of the bulb to the base if it's loose don't use it!



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 04:57 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 

The element in incandescent bulbs is a very thin corundum wire wound into a spring then wound into a spring again not spear like at all so I don't know what that guy was talking about. However when they are hot if you get them wet with a cool liquid (I.E. spit on one or sprinkle a little water) they will burst and the element will burn for a couple seconds before burning up. You can even try it out if you have an old one around but I suggest you be extremely careful and make sure you turn off the power source before removing the busted bulb or your in for a shocking experience.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by Laced713
 


Yup. I have had to remove a few of the old kind after the glass part was gone. Not easy. Have to shut off the power and use plyers.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 05:31 PM
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Originally posted by kawika
reply to post by Laced713
 


Yup. I have had to remove a few of the old kind after the glass part was gone. Not easy. Have to shut off the power and use plyers.



What a hassle that must be? You need plyers to get it out but did you need the fire department or a haze mat team?
Regards, Iwinder
edit on 10-2-2012 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


I did call 911 to have them come and clean up the glass but they hung up on me.

I miss the 80's



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by PapagiorgioCZ
LED is the future and big business already - that's the only reason why it's still so expansive. We just need more better and cheaper LEDs from China.


How about North America start making its own LEDs and take business away from China while raising tariffs and taxes simultaneously on imports FROM China.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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Originally posted by kawika
reply to post by Iwinder
 


I did call 911 to have them come and clean up the glass but they hung up on me.

I miss the 80's

Laughing here........good post indeed
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 07:10 PM
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Originally posted by kawika
In California they have outlawed the old kind and are phasing them out starting with the highest wattage ones first. People are hording them.

59 watt light

One thing I know about the CFL is that because of the power factor, they don't save that much power as capacitance has to be added to the circuit to balance the load. So as far as your electric bill, yes, them make it lower. But as far as consuming electricity, they are not as good as people think.



That is an excellent point, and is also the nub of any power saving collectively.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 08:18 PM
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Originally posted by Iwinder

Originally posted by smurfy
The old incandescent bulb was quite prone to exploding destructively, and often launching the spear-like element like a missile. LED's are the way to go, and there are newer ones now, with a more ambient light akin to the old type bulbs or the totally unreliable halogens. The white LED's just did not cut the mustard, but these newer ones are pretty good, and are as cheap as chips in the UK at least.


I beg to differ with you sir, exploding destructively eh?
Well I am way over 50 years old and never has a "old incandescent bulb" attacked me or my parents or my wife....
Good try though on the fear market, Fear sells well when facts don't.



Your age makes me senior to you, and please don't try the fear factor line with me. When I say something it is based on a truth, examples here,

www.ehow.com...

And also personal experience, when the spear as I called it (appropriately) because that is what it looks like and is actually known as the stem which carries the lead in wires, which I also referred to as an element meaning as as a part of. (The 'element' that another poster referred to is actually known as the filament, just to clear up any confusion) So when this spear/stem exploded out of the bulb it embedded itself in the floor between my feet, end of story. There have also been several times when I have had to dismantle light fixings to extract the remains of an incandescent lightbulb that has shattered aka, exploded. Take a minute to google, and you will find forums that discuss just this scenario. On the other hand try googling a manufacturers Q&A on the same subject, (yes there are) and you will find that ultimately it happens because it's not their fault, and for a multitude of reasons.
edit on 10-2-2012 by smurfy because: Text.



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