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The Flowers from the past

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posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 02:18 AM
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We all love the flowers.I think a person that does not love a flower has no soul.

Many species of flowers have disappeared in our recent history,they are almost forgotten.
Extinction of flowers have a deep negative impact on climate change.But who cares!


TextIt seems like an odd moment to be writing about spring and summer wildflowers, what with Old Man Winter hovering on the horizon. But scientists from Harvard and Boston Universities have unsettling news about the impact of climate change on plant life in the New England woods. The researchers have drawn on Henry David Thoreau's detailed records from 150 years ago on the flora around his beloved Walden Pond in Concord, Massachusetts. And they report that some species now flower as much as three weeks earlier than in Thoreau's day because of a 4.3 degree Fahrenheit increase in the mean annual temperature in the Concord area. The bad news is that whole groups of plants have had difficulty adapting to warmer times. Some 27 percent of the species that Thoreau recorded in the mid-19th century are now locally extinct while another 36 percent are so scarce that extinction may be imminent.
source(magblog.audubon.org...

source(magblog.audubon.org...

The list of extinct flowers is very large.

external text
"Mexico
Cosmos atrosanguineus, commonly called chocolate cosmos, is a type of daisy that was native to Mexico. The chocolate cosmos is extinct in the wild. In cultivation, there is one clone surviving. The chocolate cosmos reached heights of 40 to 60 cm and produced flowers of dark red with a chocolate-like fragrance.

Britain
Among the flowering plants that have disappeared from Britain are three species of protea---the mace pagoda, Wynberg conebush and diminutive powderpuff. These species had limited populations at the time of their discovery and ensuing development and habitat loss are likely the culprits that caused their extinction.

India
Euphorbia mayurnathanii was a flowering plant of India that is now extinct in the wild. The plant was first described in 1940 when it was found growing on a rocky ledge. The Euphorbia mayurnathanii does survive as a cultivated species.

Spain
Lysimachia minoricensis was found in Spain. Habitat loss is blamed for its extinction in the wild. Found in only one location in the country, it disappeared from the wild sometime between 1926 and 1950. It does survive as a cultivated species, and attempts have been made to reintroduce it to the wild.

Saint Helena
Acalypha rubrinervis, the St. Helena mountain bush, was a member of the string tree family, producing textured and colorful flowers. Found on Saint Helena island in the South Atlantic Ocean, the Acalypha rubrinervis disappeared from the island as human populations increased.

Yemen
Valerianella affinis, an annual that grew on dry hill slopes, was only seen at a single site in 19th Century Yemen. A dried specimen is all that seems to remain of this extinct plant, though investigation into its status continues.

France
The Cry violet or Cry pansy, scientifically named Viola cryana, was a native of France that is now extinct. Habitat destruction in the quarrying of limestone and over-collection by collectors drove the plant to extinction in the wild in 1930, and it was no longer available in cultivation by 1950."



Read more: Extinct Flowers List | eHow.com www.ehow.com...
list.html#ixzz1lryV7uab

source(www.ehow.com...

As for the future ,one in four flowers are threat for extinction.


TextMore than one-in-four of all flowering plants are under threat of extinction according to the latest report to confirm the ongoing destruction of much of the natural world by human activity. As a result, many of nature's most colourful specimens could be lost to the world before scientists even discover them, claims the research, published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
source(www.guardian.co.uk...

source(webecoist.momtastic.com

Who cares about the future of the flowers!




posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:12 AM
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Originally posted by diamondsmith
"Mexico
Cosmos atrosanguineus, commonly called chocolate cosmos, is a type of daisy that was native to Mexico. The chocolate cosmos is extinct in the wild. In cultivation, there is one clone surviving. The chocolate cosmos reached heights of 40 to 60 cm and produced flowers of dark red with a chocolate-like fragrance.



It's a shame but at least there are millions of gardeners who still love these old plants and there's a refuge for them. They probably have more of a chance than endangered animals when you think about it. Not everyone can have a zoo but a hell of an amount of people can have a garden.

Cosmos atrosanguineus, commonly called chocolate cosmos - I have that in my garden. Neighbour has a HUGE pot of them. Easy to look after and smells lovely. The plants are alive, just not in the place they were originally found.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:17 AM
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reply to post by wigit
 



Cosmos atrosanguineus, commonly called chocolate cosmos - I have that in my garden. Neighbour has a HUGE pot of them. Easy to look after and smells lovely. The plants are alive, just not in the place they were originally found.
At a certain level of self-consciousness we do not realize how we destroy the planet and the environment by extinguishing different species of plants and animals.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:23 AM
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reply to post by wigit
 



Not everyone can have a zoo but a hell of an amount of people can have a garden.
I would love to have a garden with extinct flowers and bring them back to life.



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