Sun flares affect our pineal gland, causing mass awakening?

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posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


That is first and foremost your fault for not knowing serum basics. The paper is, to people who understand it, directly relevant to understanding calcification dynamics in the pineal gland. Nobody is going to hold your hand if you don't know anything about human biology. At some point you need to take responsibility for your own ignorance. Simply saying it has no relevance, does in no way indicate your ability to comprehend anything I've said thus far, nor does it mean you have anything worth proving or dis-proving.
edit on 9-1-2013 by Ewok_Boba because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by Ewok_Boba
 



That is first and foremost your fault for not knowing serum basics. The paper is, to people who understand it, directly relevant to understanding calcification dynamics in the pineal gland.

Frankly, you are mistaken. It has nothing to do with the pineal gland.


Nobody is going to hold your hand if you don't know anything about human biology. At some point you need to take responsibility for your own ignorance. Simply saying it has no relevance, does in no way indicate your ability to comprehend anything I've said thus far, nor does it mean you have anything worth proving or dis-proving.

No manner of posturing on your part in any way supports the claim that this is related to the pineal gland.

Sorry, but you might consider a basic course in biology.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by wujotvowujotvowujotvo
 


Again, read the paper and learn what is stated. The paper does not support the claims you made in your post.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by phinubian
 



melanin is a sort of semiconductor or even considered a superconductor

Simply not true. There are no known room temperature superconductors. The highest known is 39K.

The problem with all of these claims if that there are events of the type claimed to lead to some sort of magical moment every few years. Normally, the doom porn crowds claims we or our way of life are doomed. Why don't these magical events happen as often as the doom porn crowd points out the events?



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


Mela (to) nin - 2 letters dropped abruptly change the biological field...

Here is a 2012 PNAS study on melanin conductivity for your knowledge.

www.pnas.org/content/109/23/8943


Published online before print May 21, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1119948109
PNAS June 5, 2012 vol. 109 no. 23 8943-8947

Role of semiconductivity and ion transport in the electrical conduction of melanin

Albertus B. Mostert a,
Benjamin J. Powell a,
Francis L. Pratt b,
Graeme R. Hanson c,
Tadeusz Sarna d,
Ian R. Gentle e, and
Paul Meredith a, 1

Author Affiliations

a Centre for Organic Photonics and Electronics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane St. Lucia QLD 4072, Australia;
b ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX, United Kingdom;
c Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Queensland, Brisbane St. Lucia QLD 4072, Australia;
d Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, 31-007, Krakow, Poland; and
e Centre for Organic Photonics and Electronics, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane St. Lucia QLD 4072, Australia

Edited by* Brian M. Hoffman, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, and approved April 6, 2012 (received for review December 3, 2011)


Abstract

Melanins are pigmentary macromolecules found throughout the biosphere that, in the 1970s, were discovered to conduct electricity and display bistable switching. Since then, it has been widely believed that melanins are naturally occurring amorphous organic semiconductors. Here, we report electrical conductivity, muon spin relaxation, and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of melanin as the environmental humidity is varied. We show that hydration of melanin shifts the comproportionation equilibrium so as to dope electrons and protons into the system. This equilibrium defines the relative proportions of hydroxyquinone, semiquinone, and quinone species in the macromolecule. As such, the mechanism explains why melanin at neutral pH only conducts when “wet” and suggests that both carriers play a role in the conductivity. Understanding that melanin is an electronic-ionic hybrid conductor rather than an amorphous organic semiconductor opens exciting possibilities for bioelectronic applications such as ion-to-electron transduction given its biocompatibility.

bioelectronics
electrical properties
biomacromolecules
ionic conduction
edit on 9-1-2013 by wujotvowujotvowujotvo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by wujotvowujotvowujotvo
 


Notice that it states semi, not superconductivity.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 11:46 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


I know that, I posted to end the melanin part quickly. It would cause pointless bickering, mycology have the best example - Chernobyl black fungus exploits melanin properties to survive radioactive surroundings.

But to return, just some observations > you seem to have your clues off or is new to the subject or both... You just won't get the reference to what is being discussed and how the information posted connect to the point constantly made to you.

On stock market and geomagnetic activity, another case where you appear to have done zero searches on that either.

The information you seek but aren't interested enough to look and confirm to yourself.

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta > Atlanta Fed Working Papers >

Playing the Field: Geomagnetic Storms and the Stock Market

Anna Krivelyova, Boston College
Cesare Robotti, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Working Paper 2003-5b
Revised October 2003

www.frbatlanta.org/pubs/wp/working_paper_2003-5b.cfm


www.frbatlanta.org/filelegacydocs/wp0305b.pdf
Explaining movements in daily stock prices is one of the most difficult tasks in modern finance. This paper contributes to the existing literature by documenting the impact of geomagnetic storms on daily stock market returns. A large body of psychological research has shown that geomagnetic storms have a profound effect on people’s moods, and, in turn, people’s moods have been found to be related to human behavior, judgments and decisions about risk. An important finding of this literature is that people often attribute their feelings and emotions to the wrong source, leading to incorrect judgments. Specifically, people affected by geomagnetic storms may be more inclined to sell stocks on stormy days because they incorrectly attribute their bad mood to negative economic prospects rather than bad environmental conditions. Misattribution of mood and pessimistic choices can translate into a relatively higher demand for riskless assets, causing the price of risky assets to fall or to rise less quickly than otherwise. The authors find strong empirical support in favor of a geomagnetic-storm effect in stock returns after controlling for market seasonals and other environmental and behavioral factors. Unusually high levels of geomagnetic activity have a negative, statistically and economically significant effect on the following week’s stock returns for all U.S. stock market indices. Finally, this paper provides evidence of substantially higher returns around the world during periods of quiet geomagnetic activity.

JEL classification: G1

Keywords: stock returns, geomagnetic storms, seasonal affective disorders, misattribution of mood, behavioral finance

The authors have benefited from the suggestions of Mark Kamstra, Lisa Kramer, Dan Waggoner, Dmitry Repin, Mark Fisher, Steve Smith, and Ron Zwickl. Comments from an anonymous referee and seminar participants at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, University of Virginia, Boston College, Georgia State University, George Washington University, University of Michigan, and University of Arizona are also acknowledged. The views expressed here are the authors’ and not necessarily those of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta or the Federal Reserve System. Any remaining errors are the authors’ responsibility.

Please address questions regarding content to Anna Krivelyova, Department of Economics, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02134, 404-869-4715, krivelyova@bc.edu, or Cesare Robotti, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, 1000 Peachtree Street, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30309, 404-498-8543, cesare.robotti@atl.frb.org.

To receive notification about new papers, please use the e-mail notification system, or contact the Public Affairs Department, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, 1000 Peachtree Street, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30309-4470, 404/498-8020.
edit on 9-1-2013 by wujotvowujotvowujotvo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2013 @ 07:10 AM
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reply to post by wujotvowujotvowujotvo
 



The information you seek but aren't interested enough to look and confirm to yourself.

Th onus is on the claimant to provide evidence to support their position. It is not in anyone's interest to guess which dubious source has formed someone's mistaken idea.

Here is that single source of unpublished information. Their research will be scrutinized further by peers. Claims of solar and lunar effects have been proposed before and all have been found to be in error.
www.bc.edu...

This is not being published in a peer reviewed journal. It is being published in a magazine where her husband works and has made similar claims.

Is there an effect on humans? This husband and wife team think so. Anyone other researchers think that is so? The article is labeled as being provocative.



posted on Jan, 10 2013 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by BelowPublicKnowledge
 


For a couple of years I have been playing with the idea that the Pineal Gland is a means, or device, for storing information relating to photoperiodism. Given that in plants photoperiodic 'memory' is passed from the Mother to progeny (seed) and is used as the measure for when to germinate, develop, mature and flower, it stands to reason that we have a similar mechanism for recording, and generationally transmitting, this information, and I believe that the Pineal Gland, in conjunction with the Pituitary Gland, seems to be a logical location for this 'device'. It would also explain the calcification process once sexual productivity has passed.

If this were the case, then it would make sense that certain light and dark patterns, or cycles, would stimulate 'memories' or feelings of deja vu.

Not sure about how that fits into Solar Flares though, but I see a glimmer of potential...if such events were cyclic and part of a global experience...



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 11:32 AM
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I do not have awakening... so the OP is wrong, as usual. My realization of the possibility of existing beings comes from EVALUATION of existing resources, documents and data of UFOs and encounters with beings and not blind belief of ETs like most do. While I am not convinced, I consider it a possibility.

It is my objectivity that made me be open for such a possibility, awakening because it was Dec 21st? Nonsense



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