Anyone know much about Metals and caring for them?

page: 2
0
<< 1   >>

log in

join

posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 09:55 PM
link   
reply to post by JoshF
 

Carbon steels are prone to oxidisation,mainly manifested in the form of surface corrosion,i.e the reddish brown rust marks.The black spots you describe are most likely oxidisation of the metal below the surface,the only sure way of eliminating them would be to machine skim the surface of the metal,not really feasible in the case of a knife blade.

If the black spots are relatively small and not touching,each other,I wouldn't worry about it,but keep an eye on the spots periodically to check if they are growing,in the meantime a good spray with WD40 should prevent further oxidisation rom taking place.




posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 10:03 PM
link   
The iron in the blade has oxidized and worn away, leaving the carbon behind, which is why it is black. At this point, the carbon is a protective coating that prevents further corrosion in those areas. "Removing" the black spots actually means wearing down the material until a new layer of steel becomes the new (lower) surface. More aesthetically pleasing, but even more damaged. At least where the black spots are, it won't corrode further.

For knives that will be stored for long periods, a softer steel is better, because it doesn't need oil and maintenance.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 11:00 PM
link   
I worked in wet underground mines for years and found a trick for protecting steel.

With survival knives this trick will work real good .

Get a container and soak your knife in it with a 75% mix if water and 25% Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver for a few days to weeks

This will leave a coating of ferric phosphate, FePO4.over the steel that protects it from further corrosion.
you can then cover the blade with cold gun bluing to blacken it

For survival you do not want a shiny reflective blade anyway.
Also grease your blade by warming it up and dipping it in a good grade grease instead of using oil.
grease lasts longer then oil and does not vaporize over time like some light oils.
edit on 7-2-2012 by ANNED because: 439563



posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 12:34 PM
link   
reply to post by JoshF
 


You've got a cut throat razor not a bushcraft knife. Not sure what you're going to use it for. The cutting edge can be restored by stropping it with the help of some polishing compound embedded in the strop. (two sides to the strop) You can easily make a stropping bat with an old full grain leather belt. Use the rough side to embed the compound.

Start with black emory compound and then on to either a green or white compound. It should restore your edge quite nicely. Enough to even get a shave. Not sure what else you'd be doing with that razor.

Here is a good video for straight razors. Patina is ok on that type of blade.




posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 12:41 PM
link   
reply to post by jibeho
 




You've got a cut throat razor not a bushcraft knife. Not sure what you're going to use it for.

Shaving. Did I say anything about a bushcraft knife?



The cutting edge can be restored by stropping it with the help of some polishing compound embedded in the strop. (two sides to the strop) You can easily make a stropping bat with an old full grain leather belt. Use the rough side to embed the compound.

Start with black emory compound and then on to either a green or white compound. It should restore your edge quite nicely. Enough to even get a shave. Not sure what else you'd be doing with that razor.

Here is a good video for straight razors. Patina is ok on that type of blade.


Did you read any of the thread?



posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 12:55 PM
link   
reply to post by JoshF
 


Yeah junior. You were worried about the little black spots depicted in the picture on the cutting edge of your "blade" and stropping with compound will remove them. Next time just call it what it is.

Sorry I wasted my time. Next time just try a polite thanks for the advice or better yet don't respond at all if you don't like what you hear. Search the web instead of asking stupid questions. Pretty simple. Try bladeforums.com next time.



posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 01:01 PM
link   
reply to post by jibeho
 




You were worried about the little black spots depicted in the picture on the cutting edge of your "blade"

There are no black spots on the edge



Pretty simple. Try bladeforums.com next time.

Couldn't you tell everyone here to post at some survival site next time?



posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 01:15 PM
link   
reply to post by JoshF
 


Zoom in on the edge of your own picture #1 and I see an edge with black spots and an irregular surface. If properly honed it would have a mirror edge. Good luck if you're shaving with it.



posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 01:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by jibeho
reply to post by JoshF
 


Zoom in on the edge of your own picture #1 and I see an edge with black spots and an irregular surface. If properly honed it would have a mirror edge. Good luck if you're shaving with it.


There are no black spots on the edge, you are probably looking at the spine. The edge does not have an irregular surface it is just reflecting what is on the opposite of it. The thing can cut a hanging hair on any section of the blade.



posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 01:24 PM
link   
reply to post by JoshF
 


reply to post by JoshF
 


Pretty much the same... but get it from a Local Hardware Supply Store ie: Ace, Denaults, Home Depot...

... and like NAKE13 stated it is a sub surface stain (hense useing the polish, it removes micro layers of the metal surface) it may not remove it all but should improve the appearance...



posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 01:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by FORMe2p00p0n
reply to post by JoshF
 


reply to post by JoshF
 


Pretty much the same... but get it from a Local Hardware Supply Store ie: Ace, Denaults, Home Depot...

... and like NAKE13 stated it is a sub surface stain (hense useing the polish, it removes micro layers of the metal surface) it may not remove it all but should improve the appearance...


Thanks, i will pick some of that up today.



posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 01:32 PM
link   
I actually wouldn't worry too much about the spotting. It appears that is either an 01 tool steel or D2 or some variant which will always "patina" with time if not coated. You can remove it but you risk the integrity of this blade as shaving razors are already thin. The edge of the blade versus the spine will have a variation of hardness so they are the thickness they are for a reason....I wouldn't mess with that.

Best bet for any straight razor is a strop with the correct compound to sharpen and oil will only make more of a mess over time.

Use Renaissance wax and prior to shaving give the blade a quick strop to remove the wax on the very edge, then once finished rub some wax back in. It lasts a long time, is not oily and protects from most issues as well as does not gather dust like oil will. Oil will "gum up" over time and attract all kinds of dust when you pull it out. Wax will not hurt your strop nor will it cause any other issues over time.



posted on Feb, 8 2012 @ 01:41 PM
link   
Another method to remove the spots without taking surface off, and if you have a wheel grinder at home, is using a paper wheel to take them out. I wouldn't recommend it unless you are really comfortable with using one though as an incorrect angle when touching the blade to the wheel will end up with the blade quickly being removed from your hands and most likely hitting you in the face. This is a very effective manner in which to remove the oxidation you are seeing though. It is more or less like a speedy version of a strop. Either way, a good strop for a straight razor shave is a great way to care for a blade.

Just be careful of the inlay (looks great by the way) as it may be extremely surface and thin itself and with any method mentioned in my post or above posts it appears it could easily be polished off.
edit on 2/8/12 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 12:08 PM
link   
reply to post by JoshF
 


Its better to do small areas of the metal as opposed to doing the whole thing at once.... let me know how it works out for you...



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 12:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by FORMe2p00p0n
reply to post by JoshF
 


Its better to do small areas of the metal as opposed to doing the whole thing at once.... let me know how it works out for you...


Its working, its a slow process but it is coming off. Thanks!



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 01:40 PM
link   
reply to post by JoshF
 


Awesome!!! I'm glad to hear that... I personally really like those types of blades, and I figure it had some personal value to you... see ya around





top topics
 
0
<< 1   >>

log in

join