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Anyone know much about Metals and caring for them?

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posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 03:32 PM
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The other day my group and i were going through storage and I opened up my old case where i keep my blade and It had rust all over it. I was able to get the rust off but there are these black spots on it too. Does anyone know what the black spots on carbon steel is and how to get it off easily?
Originally i had it oiled up before i put it in storage but stupid Rachel decided to "clean" my things a few weeks ago.




posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 03:33 PM
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Rub ur blades with a lil bit of oil and wrap in plastic. If your knife is stored for survival i would worry about a sharp blade not the black spots

edit on 7-2-2012 by shortyboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by JoshF
 


You need to clean them and oil them down after each use to prevent that. Sort of like you would do a gun. The rust might come off with C-L-R.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by shortyboy
Rub ur blades with a lil bit of oil and wrap in plastic


Yeah it was, I do believe that i mentioned that.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by Ameilia
reply to post by JoshF
 


You need to clean them and oil them down after each use to prevent that. Sort of like you would do a gun. The rust might come off with C-L-R.


black spots are rust?



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by JoshF
The other day my group and i were going through storage and I opened up my old case where i keep my blade and It had rust all over it. I was able to get the rust off but there are these black spots on it too. Does anyone know what the black spots on carbon steel is and how to get it off easily?
Originally i had it oiled up before i put it in storage but stupid Rachel decided to "clean" my things a few weeks ago.


Post a picture up and I may be able to help more.

It could just be slight pitting from the rust.

Oh, and there really is no need to oil your blades... and actually oiling the blade can trap moisture between the oil and the blade if you aren't careful.

I have quite a few old nihontos and I've never treated them except maybe twice a year to take the old oil off and reapply some Choji.

Just be careful, don't handle them too much, and keep them in their bags.

It would really help to know what you are looking at, and what type of blade it is though.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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The black spots are caused by moisture. And there's nothing you can do about the black spots now... but don't worry they don't spread like rust does and there's no harm to the blade by having them.

The worst thing you could have done was to oil them and then cover them in plastic wrap, basically you trapped moisture in there.

The best thing you can do for a carbon steel blade is to build up a patina on it by either rubbing it down with lemon or a potato... anything with acidity. Once you have a patina there's no need to oil the blade. Just keep the blade dry after every use.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by YouAreLiedTo

Originally posted by JoshF
The other day my group and i were going through storage and I opened up my old case where i keep my blade and It had rust all over it. I was able to get the rust off but there are these black spots on it too. Does anyone know what the black spots on carbon steel is and how to get it off easily?
Originally i had it oiled up before i put it in storage but stupid Rachel decided to "clean" my things a few weeks ago.


Post a picture up and I may be able to help more.

It could just be slight pitting from the rust.

Oh, and there really is no need to oil your blades... and actually oiling the blade can trap moisture between the oil and the blade if you aren't careful.

I have quite a few old nihontos and I've never treated them except maybe twice a year to take the old oil off and reapply some Choji.

Just be careful, don't handle them too much, and keep them in their bags.

It would really help to know what you are looking at, and what type of blade it is though.


here you go.

The spine is gold but it kind of looks like rust in the picture.


this one you can really see the black spots better.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by JoshF
 


soak it in some coca-cola(other brands availible)



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by CranialSponge
 


They were oiled but they were never wrapped up in plastic, someone else said to do that.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by JoshF
 


Thats called oxidation stud. Its FUBAR grind it or toss it but if its a nickle finish its toast.Too bad it looked like a nice $12 knife

I take it back...

Is it a german strait razor ....dont shave with it oxidation has made it a serrated blade
Dovo Strait Razors
edit on 7-2-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:07 PM
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Originally posted by JoshF
reply to post by CranialSponge
 


They were oiled but they were never wrapped up in plastic, someone else said to do that.


Well, somehow moisture got trapped/locked in.

So now you have those black spots. It isn't esthetically pretty, but they won't eat away at the blade, it's just simple discolouration. You can rub down the blade with something like Flitz just to try to blend in the black spots so the blade looks prettier, but that's about the best you're going to get at this point.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by rebellender
reply to post by JoshF
 


Thats called oxidation stud. Its FUBAR grind it or toss it but if its a nickle finish its toast.Too bad it looked like a nice $12 knife

I take it back...

Is it a german strait razor ....dont shave with it oxidation has made it a serrated blade
edit on 7-2-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)


Serrated blade?
edit on 7-2-2012 by JoshF because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:10 PM
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C.L.R. it will take the oxadation off you can get it a ace or just google it, soak the blade then rub it off , then coat in 3in1 oil then put in bag. Works for me



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:11 PM
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just relegate it to stuff like cutting back bushes/basic garden use as i doubt anyone will ever complain about it



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:17 PM
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reply to post by ga-`tv-gi
 


no its carbon steel its pitted

does this look familiar
edit on 7-2-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by rebellender
reply to post by ga-`tv-gi
 


no its carbon steel its pitted its junk now

does this look familiar
edit on 7-2-2012 by rebellender because: (no reason given)


I don't see how it is junk, it still keeps its edge and the black spots are nowhere near the edge. I can pay 70 bucks and have it restored but i wanted to know if anyone here had any ideas.

And that one in the link is not mine. The one I have has a bone handle



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by JoshF
 

in that case I do beg your pardon



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by JoshF
 


70 bucks sounds about right... it could take 3 or 4 hours to remove all the stains and not damage the surface in the process

I do work for a stone & metal refinishing company (mostly stainless steel and brass/bronze)... it seems like the blade you have is somewhat decorative and reflective so DO NOT USE an abrasive (like steel wool or scotchbrite pad) your best bet is to get ahold of a metal polish and apply as directed (usually with a soft cloth). A metal polish contains a micro abrasive compound in it that will micro polish the surface and usually remove those blemishes (kind of like what tooth paste does for your teeth or "comet" does for a porcelain sink). Depending on the severity of the staining you may need to use a little or alot of elbow grease (or probably finger grease in this case). Use a old toothbrush to remove any polish residue that may get into the crevices....

If some spotting remains you may need to use a 0000 steel wool, but I really caution using this cause you could put unwanted scratches in the blades surface... so if you decide to do this, do it very lightly because you could make things look worse and have to pay your guy $150 to restore ; )

I also used to collect coins when I was a kid... My uncle taught me to clean my coins using a baking soda/water mixture (baking soda is used as a abrasive compound) use the eraser at the end of a pencil to scoop a bit of the mixture up and start erasing the blemishes.... I would use this as a last "poor mans" resort

Anyway good luck with it hope it works out for you



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by FORMe2p00p0n
 


Thanks, i will give it a shot. Can you recommend any particular polish or are they all the same thing?





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