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What if all the major religions started out with the same story and it slowly diverged from there

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posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 01:25 AM
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reply to post by MESSAGEFROMTHESTARS
 





TextIt's a very awesome topic for discussion


I agree.

Have you ever read the intro to the Necronomicon? I would recomend it.The guy talks about the old gods of sumeria and stuff. Its in the 'Simon Necronomicon'. Im pretty sure its more of a short story than anything but its a great read.

darkbooks.org...




posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 01:35 AM
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reply to post by QuestionsEverything
 


I like your way of thinking
...it's similar in nature to one of my first threads on ATS
Have we done this all before...and before...and before...

Please have a look if you wish and at your leisure of course.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 07:10 AM
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reply to post by QuestionsEverything
 
Its hard to be sure about some things because we have good examples of modern history not being accurately correct ..ww1,ww2,Vietnam Iraq to name a few that seems to have Incorporated some fiction into the narrative ....If we cant trust our history that is close to our time frame ,how can we trust things that were dated a long time ago?


The Septuagint ( /ˈsɛptjuːəˌdʒɪnt/), or simply "LXX", is an Ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. It is referred to in critical works by the abbreviation [1] or G. It was originally the designation for the Koine Greek translation of the Pentateuch, but came in time to refer to the Greek translation of the Old Testament adopted by Christians, incorporating the translations of all the books of the Hebrew Bible and books later considered apocryphal or deutero-canonical, some composed in Greek and some translations. The translation process was undertaken in stages. It began by the 3rd century BCE and was completed by 132 BCE,[2][3] initially in Alexandria, but in time possibly elsewhere, too.[4





Your brief mention of the Nicene council has differing opinions as to the true reason it occurred ... so a person can follow the many different trains of thought and be comfortable in developing ones own narrative ...Its not very hard to infuse our own bias on any subject because we are given many schools of thought with many options ..



I recently watched a lecture vid from the all roads Babylon thread where the guy said something that made sense ..He found a link to the old historical gods names with the names of the families from post flood ..I think he was a archaeologist . he gave good evidence from the bible as well as ancient historians that can be linked to the names of the north American tribes ..the tribe names come from a geographical location closely associated with people who bare ..I thought that made sense as we do the same today when naming streets towns and the such ..He dates people with thier forfathers names .and with different languages, recording borrowed words from other languages that may have conquered or took up close trades with each other ..



In another lecture by a different guy he looks at finding dates to Egypt by using different methods not related to each other that concludes that conventional Egyptian history cant be accurate ...I am not sure that the revised history will ever make it into the history books because ,,well that just might upset a few apple carts ..


Its like we are given a piece of the puzzle but the wrong time and location to verify if its true ...once you know where to look and when to look most of the historical biblical references seem to be quite accurate ...And if you want to upset a bunch of apple carts then just prove that what the bible says is closer to the truth than what we are told ... some people are very afraid to do that and others are not afraid to at least look ...its the ones that don't seem to have a bias either way that can find the little nuggets that are most precious to the ones looking to understand what was ,what might be,and if possible what is to come ....ok so I have rambled enough I don't think I have answered any questions you may have had in your op but you did get me thinking ..thanks ...peace



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by NOTurTypical
 


No, I mean older then the accounts of Noah even. Hinduism and Zoroastrianism are both older along with the religions of ancient Babylon and Sumeria and Assyria. There are many major points on which these ancient religions have similarities like resurrection and monotheism, along with many sharing close views of heaven and hell.
Why do they all have somewhat close back stories and ideas about our origins and future?



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 08:41 AM
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reply to post by MESSAGEFROMTHESTARS
 


Lol I feel like I'm just a little too slow to grasp the meaning of what your saying in this verse. The recurrence of 6's, 7's, 3's and 12's has always mystified me. I've done some reading on numerology but it being such a mysterious subject with no clear explanations( that I've seen) on why some numbers are important has put it into the realm of topics I'd like to have a deeper understanding of someday.

There's instances in nature such as the Fibonacci sequence and the Golden Ratio that I know hold some kind of meaning in their prevalence throughout nature but I don't know as we'll ever fully understand them. And if we ever do gain this insight will we then truly discover the meaning of life and become as gods?



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by QuestionsEverything
 


That's exactly what happened. Read Zecharia Sitchen's book "The End of Days", and it will explain it all. It goes back to the very beginning and pieces together the puzzle of what happened with the "gods" that landed on Earth, according to Sumerian and Akkadian texts. These stories are echoed and coincide with every major religion, because these groups of gods feuded and dispersed throughout the world, which is why we see similar structures located in various places on the earth. So basically, all the age-old fighting in the middle east was started by these gods, and they're not even here any more...we're basically fighting wars that weren't started by us, but by our creators. HOWEVER, they are returning with the planet/star that is on an elliptical orbit, due to swing past us this year...so the texts state, that is. He makes the assertion that Jesus is Marduk, and since all the gods at that time were assigned to planets and constellations as their alter identities, (which was the birth of the original religion on earth - the star religion - now mocked and labeled as astrology), Marduk IS Nibiru.

It's well worth the read if you have the time!



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 09:12 AM
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reply to post by thepupils
 


I can't say as I've done any research on Aboriginal beliefs and history beyond some bits and pieces I've picked up from some fiction I've read. Seems to be a lot in common with Native American beliefs in regards to living in harmony with nature but I'm probably way off base. Thanks for pointing me in a new direction.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 09:21 AM
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reply to post by UberL33t
 


Thank you sir or m'am, not sure which. I'll definitely give your thread a read, always interested in this topic.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:31 AM
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reply to post by the2ofusr1
 


My point exactly in regards to the dilution of the original story, people have a hard time keeping facts straight even for a few weeks as memory is largely an individual process. Taken over the course of thousands or tens of thousands of years of re-tellings and translations its no wonder our past is filled with tales of fire breathing beasts and giants and the like.

The council of Nicea interests me due to the fact that such a large group of early christian leaders got together and were able to hash out the basis for a new religion. Sure would have liked to have been a fly on the wall at that conference. There's so many different opinions on how they made the decision on what to consider as the Word of God and what they thought of as merely personal accounts that it's hard to seperate fact from fiction.

Ancient Babylon and stories of the tower of Babel have always held great interest to me as these predate most of accurate written history. Makes you wonder what kind of discoveries are buried under a couple hundred feet of sand and un-exploded ordinances just waiting to be uncovered.

I do so much reading on different topics sometimes I have a hard time keeping my facts and societies accurate, what is the consensus on how far back Egyptian history goes? Another case of magical creatures and living gods walking the earth being portrayed as reality, what would lead an advanced society capable of building structures that have lasted 10's of thousands of years to believe in something so otherworldly? Ancient Aliens? Makes just as much sense as anything at explaining the crazier aspects of early history.

Thanks for the addition of more rabbit holes for me to fall into ; )



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:35 AM
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A major contribution towards unification/reconciliation of the world's religions has been made by a British former theoretical physicist, who has proved that the sacred geometries of Judaism (the Otz Chiim, or Tree of Life), the Sri Yantra of Tantric Hinduism, the 64 hexagrams of the ancient Taoist system of divination known as 'I Ching' and the five Platonic solids that figure in the cosmology of Pythagoranism and Platonism are all isomorphic, or mathematically equivalent to one another in a 1:1 way. He has revealed amazing and beautiful properties in the geometries at the heart of the mystical traditions of religions that amount to compelling evidence of the existence of a transcendental intelligence and a universal, mathematical paradigm behind subatomic particles, man, music, etc.

You can study his research at:
smphillips.8m.com...

Please be advised that you will need to spend some time and energy mastering his huge amount of mentally challenging, rigorous research before you can start to comprehend the correspondence that it reveals between the sacred geometries of religions.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by QuestionsEverything
 



No, I mean older then the accounts of Noah even.


Okay, Adam, Eve, and Seth? Can't get much further back than that. I don"t know if you realize or not, but there was a "shining one" in the garden that overheard the prophetic plan of redemption uttered by God in the garden in Eden.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by QuestionsEverything
 



The council of Nicea interests me due to the fact that such a large group of early christian leaders got together and were able to hash out the basis for a new religion. Sure would have liked to have been a fly on the wall at that conference. There's so many different opinions on how they made the decision on what to consider as the Word of God and what they thought of as merely personal accounts that it's hard to seperate fact from fiction.


It' easy to separate fact from fiction. Things that come from books found in the fiction section of the bookstore (DaVinci Code) should be considered "fiction". The books of the Bible were not discussed at Nicea, neither was the deity of Christ determined at Nicea. The Council was convened to address the Arian heresy, and to nail down a date to celebrate Easter. And btw, Constantine didn't have a vote.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by NOTurTypical
 


What verse in Genesis exactly does it say there was a "shining one" in the garden with Adam and Eve?



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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Originally posted by markuz93
reply to post by NOTurTypical
 


What verse in Genesis exactly does it say there was a "shining one" in the garden with Adam and Eve?


"Nachash" in the Hebrew means "shining one" or something that is "shiny". It later became "snake". You don't really think there was a talking "snake" in the garden in Eden do you?

The Nachash and his Seed



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by Gseven
 


I've never read any of his works, most of what I know about the Annunaki and Nibiru comes from internet posts and youtube videos watched during a times of altered consciousness. Is he actually a legit researcher? I do have to say that alien creators do tie in nicely with the more fantastic theories on our origins. I read a quote in a book, I think it was The Taking by Dean Koontz where someone says something along the lines of " If we were to come in contact with a civilization hundreds of thousands of years more advanced then us, their technology would be perceived as supernatural in nature."

Food for thought.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 11:18 AM
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reply to post by micpsi
 


Again another topic I haven't delved into as much as I'd like. Thanks for the info ; )



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by QuestionsEverything
 


Well, if you think about it . . .

All mythologies and religions share common elements, as a result of the diffusion of civilization. However, if you REALLY trace things back . . .

Buddhism and Hinduism (and Sikhism) share many elements. Indeed, Buddha was a Hindu, and certain Hindu priesthoods follow a moral system nearly identical to Buddhism. The Hindu holy scriptures, commonly called the Vedas, tell of a story where the underlying conflict is between the rightful Devas and the Asuras. In Zoroastrianism (which was founded around 600 BC but follows tradition established much earlier), the conflict is between the rightful Ahuras and the Daevas. Parallel, much?

Modern ethnographers trace the "coincidence" to the Indo-Aryan peoples. The Aryans (not to be confused with the Germanic "super-race" of WWII) were indigenous to Iran, but invaded India and brought their religion with them. This invasion supposedly ocurred in prehistory. I am not sure if I believe this, as there is much evidence against this, but the connections cannot be ignored.

Meanwhile, over in Canaan (modern Israel), the religions of Abraham are taking hold. These are not entirely independent from the Aryan belief systems, and seem to be influenced from late Zoroastrianism, but they are for the most part separate. It began with Judaism around 1200 BC, then to Christianity around 0 AD and even to Islam around the 600s. (Must be something with those years divisible by 600, eh?)

Thus, we have our main global religions. But the real conspiracy is: did Abraham draw his radical religion from the traditions of the time, and does the Aryan religion have common roots with the Abrahamic one?

A mystery like all others,
Seraph



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by NOTurTypical
 


Ok, the article makes sense about a possible mistranslation on the word serpent, but it loses me here:
"She was in the presence of one of the sons of God, beings
who had free will, who were more powerful than mere angels, whom
humanity was created “a little lower” (Psalm 8:4-5; the phrase usually
translated as “a little lower than the angels” is actually “a little lower
than the elohim in the Hebrew text).3 She was speaking to a member
of the divine council who did not share Yahweh’s enthusiasm for his
new creation, humankind, to whom Yahweh had just given rule over
the planet (Gen 1:26-27). These mere humans were—as the “lesser
elohim” had been previously—created as Yahweh’s image (“let US”…
“OUR” in Gen 1:26-27), to rule the cosmos for Yahweh, and earth – at
least until humanity was fashioned."
If this is correct, the higher angels (Satan mainly) were mad because God created man in his image (verse 27) and gave him dominion over the earth and heavens, in the span of six days (angels and man). I agree with the fact that a talking snake to sound crazy but in Numbers 22:28 Balaam does not seem the least bit surprised that his donkey was talking to him.
However, the serpent really being a shining being in the garden makes sense though.
edit on 4-2-2012 by markuz93 because: misread



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by markuz93
 


Not necessarily a "mistranslation" my friend. But over time one term began to be synonymous with the other. The Nachash was a "shiny" entity in the garden, and over time "Nachash" became to mean "serpent" because of the narrative from Genesis. Serpent apparently is more of a noun usage for Nachash, while "shining one" is an adjective use of the same word. And that goes along with what Paul declares in the NT. That satan himself transforms into an "angel of light" and not to marvel.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 01:08 PM
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You're not breaking into anything new here. Every religion is practically the same story with some different twists here and there. That's been realized for quite a while. Religion is the world's most common mental disorder.
edit on 4-2-2012 by FreedomXisntXFree because: (no reason given)



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