It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Why are humans so different from any other species?

page: 3
5
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 12:10 PM
link   
its because of our thumbs. and because our mother earth needed to evolve and without us she won't. Man made = nature made if you think about it.




posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 12:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by targeting
What made humans evolve to be so powerful?

blood upgrading/mixing of DNA genetics*

Originally posted by targeting
We have no natural predators, we rule the world, and have virtually no competition in the animal kingdom.

Im not sure about that, maybe thats what many are taught to think as to not fear or PREPARE??

Originally posted by targeting
I've been thinking about this a lot lately and I was wondering if anyone had any theories. Sometimes it almost seems like human's destiny as a species is to destroy the earth and all other animals.

or to evolve and be HARVESTED into another species -cosmic related- plans or genetics. Humans may be on a military form outpost/genetic/SPIRITUAL farm for reproduction or worst case food just growing and dying until they ripen thru their LIFE AND DEATH PHASES OF EXISTENCE.

Originally posted by targeting
How and why would evolution create a species that was destined to destroy the system on which all life thrives? It seems pretty counterproductive.

UNLESS IN TRAINING???! Imagine you plant seeds from a tree so the seeds grow to defend the tree!

Interesting questions, but humans may not even be native to EA*rth remembers EDIN zone.

edit on 2/7/12 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 12:23 PM
link   
What makes you think we are really so different?
We fight for territory, we fight for sexual partners, many fight to become the most dominant among their peers etc. We are not that much different at all. Even those that prefer not to fight are still like the animals that back off and wait for scraps. The latter in fact, is most of us.
The reason we are at the top of the food chain is because of our ability to create weapons to defend ourselves from predators. We do not need fangs or claws because we can make a spear or forge a sword, and not too many animals will survive a gunshot wound.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 02:03 PM
link   
We rule the world for now. Our tech can't withstand extreme cold or EM radiation. As soon as we had to live like our ancestors we would be a lot less evolved. Think about no hospitals, medication etc. And then think about venomous animals and animals that are way stronger and/or quicker.

Technology makes us rule the world for as long as this technology is adapted to the natural environment.

It is the same environment that allowed us to become what we are. If the dinosaurs weren't extinct mammals would still be small rat like creatures.

In the end I think that necessity forced us to walk upright (to see above tall grass). That made our hands available. Otherwise no writing and no real civilisation. Of course speech is also essential and I guess this somehow co-evolved with the use of our hands.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 04:22 AM
link   
reply to post by targeting
 




What made humans evolve to be so powerful?


Mathematics and running
-the study of quantity, structure, space, and change, and we are movement and in motion for abstract motivations that some may have no end.



We have no natural predators,


With the way of thinking we’ve had, which is based on systems, we have arranged a situational awareness that encompasses modeling capabilities. We express our way of thinking through our technologies, material culture, and tempo.



we rule the world,


From a perspective that thrives on the economic system, we govern the world economically. It’s nothing more than a system of numbers containing abstract value.

From a perspective that thrives on consumption, we govern the resources available through political, corporate, and private systems. Very few indigenous people govern the resources available to them. Their political and organizational systems, their systems of life, were destroyed or absorbed into systems that thrived in a larger context.

From a perspective that thrives on being human, yes, we govern the world.



and have virtually no competition in the animal kingdom.


We have no competition in the animal kingdom because we’ve been developing a system to classify it, understanding, and apply it as necessary i.e. hunting.



I've been thinking about this a lot lately and I was wondering if anyone had any theories.


What is the context for our development to becoming so powerful?

Fossil evidence of the oldest bipedal hominin is dated to 2.7 million years ago.

5.332 million to 2.588 million years ago,



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 04:23 AM
link   
reply to post by targeting
 


"The climate was becoming cooler and drier, and seasonal, similar to modern climate.

The global average temperature in the mid-Pliocene (3.3 mya - 3 mya) was 2-3°C higher than today,[4] global sea level 25 m higher [5] and Northern hemisphere ice sheet ephemeral before the onset of extensive glaciation over Greenland that occurred in the late Pliocene around 3 Ma.[6] The formation of an Arctic ice cap is signaled by an abrupt shift in oxygen isotope ratios and ice-rafted cobbles in the North Atlantic and North Pacific ocean beds.[7] Mid-latitude glaciation was probably underway before the end of the epoch. The global cooling that occurred during the Pliocene may have spurred on the disappearance of forests and the spread of grasslands and savannas.[8]

Continents continued to drift, moving from positions possibly as far as 250 km from their present locations to positions only 70 km from their current locations. South America became linked to North America through the Isthmus of Panama during the Pliocene, making possible the Great American Interchange and bringing a nearly complete end to South America's distinctive large marsupial predator and native ungulate faunas. The formation of the Isthmus had major consequences on global temperatures, since warm equatorial ocean currents were cut off and an Atlantic cooling cycle began, with cold Arctic and Antarctic waters dropping temperatures in the now-isolated Atlantic Ocean.

Africa's collision with Europe formed the Mediterranean Sea, cutting off the remnants of the Tethys Ocean. The border between the Miocene and the Pliocene is also the time of the Messinian salinity crisis. Sea level changes exposed the land-bridge between Alaska and Asia. Pliocene marine rocks are well exposed in the Mediterranean, India, and China. Elsewhere, they are exposed largely near shores.

The change to a cooler, dry, seasonal climate had considerable impacts on Pliocene vegetation, reducing tropical species worldwide. Deciduous forests proliferated, coniferous forests and tundra covered much of the north, and grasslands spread on all continents (except Antarctica). Tropical forests were limited to a tight band around the equator, and in addition to dry savannahs, deserts appeared in Asia and Africa.

Both marine and continental faunas were essentially modern, although continental faunas were a bit more primitive than today. The first recognizable hominins, the australopithecines, appeared in the Pliocene.

The land mass collisions meant great migration and mixing of previously isolated species, such as in the Great American Interchange. Herbivores got bigger, as did specialized predators."

More here: Pliocene

Around 2.7 million years ago, our proto-ancestors had established a way of relating to everything. They ran with a trajectory towards a destination. Each footstep had a trajectory and left a footprint. The system of ecosystems contained a niche for the diversifying old ones to relate to through a modeling sense. That is how, with each step, we survive.

Our proto-ancestors read the natural mechanisms; they ran to run like the other species. Our proto-ancestors shared the natural mechanisms; they ran together with planned trajectories. Our proto-ancestors pulled apart the natural mechanisms; they ran together but many trajectories were projected towards many destinations. Our proto-ancestors reconfigured the natural mechanisms; they ran together into the imagination and stood up to train themselves by utilizing the natural mechanisms we have conceptualized into “law” that every change in the form and the function of a bone or in the function of the bone alone, leads to changes in its internal architecture and in its external form.



Sometimes it almost seems like human's destiny as a species is to destroy the earth and all other animals. How and why would evolution create a species that was destined to destroy the system on which all life thrives? It seems pretty counterproductive.


Are our destinies contained within the atmosphere of the earth? If all of us share the thing we walk on, does that type of relationship mean that other species and earth have a destiny as well?

What does the process of evolution involve? Could we be observing the destructive side of evolution? Are we that destructive side? But what is destruction really? How is it possible that we may become the constructive side of evolution?

edit on 9-2-2012 by voicefromtheages because: added text



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 04:39 AM
link   
We are the apex if you consider Humans as a loosely alligned organism..

Individually (without education, manufacturing and invention) we are not quite as far removed from our Primate Cousins.

If you took the average Human, removed their education, clothes and family you're left with a fairly weak and only fairly cunning animal.

How many people reading this have ever invented anything?
How many people reading this have ever discovered anything?
How many people reading this will actually be remembered ( by anyone outside of thier family) within 50 years of their death?


Togethor in groups we are strong...but individually we've been made weak and so far removed from the natural world that we've become like any other domesticated animal...roughly the same bilological mass but not capable of looking after ourselves if the farmer isnt around.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 04:48 AM
link   

Originally posted by Jukiodone
We are the apex if you consider Humans as a loosely alligned organism..

Individually (without education, manufacturing and invention) we are not quite as far removed from our Primate Cousins.

If you took the average Human, removed their education, clothes and family you're left with a fairly weak and only fairly cunning animal.

How many people reading this have ever invented anything?
How many people reading this have ever discovered anything?
How many people reading this will actually be remembered ( by anyone outside of thier family) within 50 years of their death?


Togethor in groups we are strong...but individually we've been made weak and so far removed from the natural world that we've become like any other domesticated animal...roughly the same bilological mass but not capable of looking after ourselves if the farmer isnt around.


What is invention when the parts are already here?
What is a discovery when the discovered is already here?
What is the value of a person today compared to the populations of old ones of Antiquity?

Be careful not to speak generally for all of us. Your survival potential may be dependent on the relationships surrounding you i.e. are you sedentary or are you active? what is your habitat? what is your sustenance? how do you relate to where you are most of the time?



new topics

top topics



 
5
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join