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Looming Threat of a Solar Superstorm - Popular Mechanics - Another Warning

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posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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New info in this article: Canada & Finland have added protective devices to their

high voltage transformers.


- Popular Mechanics - Looming Threat - New Info

I guess if lights go out here in the USA, head north to Canada.

Replacement high voltage transformers 4 -10 years?!

Can't say they didn't warn you.





posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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I wonder why our govt hasn't taken the precautionary measures Canada has.
Better safe than sorry!
edit on 3-2-2012 by grumpydaysleeper because: brain stalled



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 12:54 PM
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Originally posted by grumpydaysleeper
I wonder why our govt hasn't taken the precautionary methods Canada has.
Better safe than sorry!


because theres no profit



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 01:09 PM
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Originally posted by grumpydaysleeper
I wonder why our govt hasn't taken the precautionary measures Canada has.
Better safe than sorry!
edit on 3-2-2012 by grumpydaysleeper because: brain stalled


If you look closely you will discover that our power grid has been recently - altered -.

The great state of Texas has it own power grid.

West Coast Power Grid

East Coast Power Grid

Texas Grid

That means Texas could open up their disconnects, isolate Texas and go completely

dark just a few hours before the CME slams into our magnetosphere and Earth.

After the ion storm passes, just wait about 2 days and then turn Texas back on.

The high voltage transformers won't explode if they are turned off and cold.



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by grumpydaysleeper
I wonder why our govt hasn't taken the precautionary measures Canada has.
Better safe than sorry!
edit on 3-2-2012 by grumpydaysleeper because: brain stalled


Because they don't give a f*** about us. The bright side is they will probably move to Canada to save their a****s and leave us alone.



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 01:29 PM
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Buy some kerosine lamps and kerosine and get a portable stove. Stock some food so you aren't waiting in line everyday. Why worry about things we can't do anything about. Get you're preparedness up for a broad band of events. It doesn't really cost that much but it won't do you much good if a Tornado blows apart you're home. At least you got something to eat when you're digging through the rubble after the Tornado. The cangoods flying around in the tornado will make sure you are not alone in you're grief also. Their car could get beaned
edit on 3-2-2012 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by Eurisko2012
 


It hardly matters when the satellites are ruined.



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 01:42 PM
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Switching off will only help in some cases, the huge distribution transformers would survive at least. BUT... The EM gradients could destroy the coils in the local distribution transformers by corona discharges. They are made for 60HZ not KHz range. The high voltage will arc through the winding insulation to the layer underneath rather than going through the conductor. When switched back on the power may arc in the damaged part and short out a winding in the transformer, then boom. If the grid was live when it happened it would blow up everything if we had an 1800's style storm.



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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When everything electronic burns out and all you're savings is impossible to get at, fear not. You're mortgage will still survive.



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 02:12 PM
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I wouldn't worry too much, if all of our nuclear plants lose offsite power most of us won't have too long to fret over it.



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by Eurisko2012
 


On the topic of solar storms, the most comprehensive presentation that I know of is on the website of Gary Null, PhD, the Academy Award-nominated documentary filmmaker, author, health researcher, radio host (on the Progressive Radio Network), and public speaker. At the end of the essay there are 28 references to the data sources used:

www.garynull.com...



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 05:27 PM
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In the US the generation and transmission of electrical power is mostly not a function of the government but of private enterprise. As the article points out, the industry is in the process of developing standards and procedures to mitigate the effects of severe geomagnetic activity. It is in their own self-interest to do so. If the grids go down, so do they.
edit on 2/3/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 05:06 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
In the US the generation and transmission of electrical power is mostly not a function of the government but of private enterprise.


I am pretty sure if we dig a little bit, we'll find out they are the same people or at least they have strong connections.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 08:52 AM
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Originally posted by KaiserSoze
I wouldn't worry too much, if all of our nuclear plants lose offsite power most of us won't have too long to fret over it.


Apparently, there is a right way and a wrong way to build a fission nuclear power plant.

I like the ones that have the huge cooling towers.

If the emergency generators don't work, then gravity will do the work and cool down

the reactors. Just open the valves.

The huge cooling tower design would have come in handy in Japan.

Tokyo Electric didn't plan on the emergency generators getting flooded out by a tsunami.


edit on 4-2-2012 by Eurisko2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 09:02 AM
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Originally posted by eywadevotee
Switching off will only help in some cases, the huge distribution transformers would survive at least. BUT... The EM gradients could destroy the coils in the local distribution transformers by corona discharges. They are made for 60HZ not KHz range. The high voltage will arc through the winding insulation to the layer underneath rather than going through the conductor. When switched back on the power may arc in the damaged part and short out a winding in the transformer, then boom. If the grid was live when it happened it would blow up everything if we had an 1800's style storm.


Maybe in Texas the smart electrical engineers installed some new and improved local

distribution transformers. I see isolating Texas as just another smart contingency plan.

If i were in charge, i would have done the same thing.

Plan for the worst and hope for the best.

It looks like they have done just that in Canada and Finland.
---------

It makes you think. Can you just imagine the next day. The entire Earth dark as coal

but Texas , Canada & Finland are lit up like a Christmas Tree.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 09:08 AM
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Originally posted by jazz10
reply to post by Eurisko2012
 


It hardly matters when the satellites are ruined.


Satellites are designed to ride out a solar storm.

However, if they burn up then they will have to be replaced.

We have the technology and the means to recover from anything.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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Originally posted by Eurisko2012

Originally posted by KaiserSoze
I wouldn't worry too much, if all of our nuclear plants lose offsite power most of us won't have too long to fret over it.


Apparently, there is a right way and a wrong way to build a fission nuclear power plant.

I like the ones that have the huge cooling towers.

If the emergency generators don't work, then gravity will do the work and cool down

the reactors. Just open the valves.

The huge cooling tower design would have come in handy in Japan.

Tokyo Electric didn't plan on the emergency generators getting flooded out by a tsunami.


edit on 4-2-2012 by Eurisko2012 because: (no reason given)


I'm not sure what the right way is but I have seen plenty examples of the wrong way though. I don't think those cooling towers would have helped much. They may have helped release enough radioactive hydrogen to prevent some of the explosions though, I'm not sure. What they can't do is unmeltdown a reactor which was the condition some or all were in by the time the tsunami hit.

www.bloomberg.com


A monitoring post on the perimeter of the plant about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile) from the No. 1 reactor went off at 3:29 p.m., minutes before the station was overwhelmed by the tsunami that knocked out backup power that kept reactor cooling systems running, according to documents supplied by the company. The monitor was set to go off at high levels of radiation, an official said.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by KaiserSoze
 


The tsunami knocked out the back up generators.

I was in the U.S. Navy. They should have placed the back up generators in a

waterproof enclosure with watertight hatches.

It looks like they cut corners and installed the back up generators in a sprayproof

enclosure. Also, if you look at the topography of the area with Google Earth

it would have been a good idea to locate the back up generators up on the hill

and out of harms way.


Hindsight is 20/20.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:21 AM
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reply to post by Eurisko2012
 
Satellites are designed to be shut off during a solar storm remotely and have some shielding. When a big solar storm hits, or better yet a series of midsize storms, earths fields expand and the satelites can then fall down or else be put in a useless orbit. Some satelites have engines to move them around to reposition them but their fuel is limited and this reduces their life expectancy. I just know a little about this, I'm sure there are some that can give you more complicated versions. Hopefully someone will correct me if some of my perception is flawed. I can always learn more. I like communicating in laymans terms. There's different names for the types of orbits. I refer to them as either moving, following the earth, or between the earth and sun. I don't understand how the last type can be in opposition with the sun though.



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:24 AM
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Originally posted by Eurisko2012
New info in this article: Canada & Finland have added protective devices to their

high voltage transformers.


- Popular Mechanics - Looming Threat - New Info

I guess if lights go out here in the USA, head north to Canada.

Replacement high voltage transformers 4 -10 years?!

Can't say they didn't warn you.




what good does that warning do if you can't prepare or prevent it ?

That is like warning somebody who is chained to the highway that a car is about to hit them....it's not like they can escape the hit .



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