Music From Tree Rings

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posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 10:53 AM
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reply to post by Realm52
 


I wonder if and how much different the noises will be when using different tree species.

Good question. Like what does a swamp tree sound like compared to a mountain top pine or a river bank willow? Now that we have the player someone is sure to find out. Maybe we could even invent a reader that plays strata from ice cores? Or the rings of Saturn???




posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


wow holy # is about all i can say. that music is pretty awesome



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 01:54 PM
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Sounds like Liberace with St Vitus' dance.



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 02:09 PM
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Beautiful and haunting


But...

Has anyone seen the movie 'The Happening' ?

Just hope this isn't a trigger for an event like that, would truly suck to be honest!!
edit on 3-2-2012 by StarTraveller because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by StarTraveller
 


Has anyone seen the movie 'The Happening' ?
Just hope this isn't a trigger for an event like that, would truly suck to be honest!!

Hmmm... better pull it then so they don't get any ideas from this being played all over the world? They could be listening. A better revolt would be to stop producing O2, maybe? We'd all choke and then fertilize them and they could go on for more millions of centuries without our chain saws and stuff.



posted on Feb, 6 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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Very intriguing. I really could listen to it all day, even though it makes me feel strange.

I think it is very telling that one can hear the different type of tree's life cycles. The first tree's life was simple with one burl in the middle. The second tree's life was all over the place, imperfect, but somehow uniform.

Thank you for posting.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by ottobot
 


I think it is very telling that one can hear the different type of tree's life cycles. The first tree's life was simple with one burl in the middle. The second tree's life was all over the place, imperfect, but somehow uniform.

I caught the difference too. The burl on the first one was an injury maybe? That trees musical number "crashed" every time the burl came around on the player. It's growth seemed muted...

Whereas the second tree was more "vibrant" with life? Want to hear more of these...



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 11:54 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
I caught the difference too. The burl on the first one was an injury maybe? That trees musical number "crashed" every time the burl came around on the player. It's growth seemed muted...

Whereas the second tree was more "vibrant" with life? Want to hear more of these.


The first tree, according to the fellow who make the recordings, was a Douglas Fir. You can see that the rings are fairly well spaced on the record. So, I think that the tree may have lived in a forest or similarly protected place, but had some type of stress that resulted in the burl. Maybe a branch fell off or was struck by lightning?

The second tree is apparently an Ash tree. The rings are very close together, You can see discolorations on the rings, but it looks like it had a fairly healthy life.

I agree, I'd like to hear more from various types of trees.

I keep watching the video - it amazes me every time I watch it.



posted on Jun, 23 2012 @ 01:55 AM
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Thanks for sharing this. It's a very welcome change from the stuff I'm immersed in.
Half a mile from where I live there's a natural amphitheatre facing a hillside covered in trees. It's a great place to hear the trees talking.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


I guess the piece produced by the tree depends on where the crosscut is made, huh?



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 03:51 PM
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I just closed my eyes and listened to the music composed by the tree rings and, was it just me or did it sound as if the tree was in agony the whole time of its life?

Did anyone else get goosebumps?



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by Kester
 

Kester. Sorry I didn't get back to you earlier. Thanks for dropping in.


Half a mile from where I live there's a natural amphitheatre facing a hillside covered in trees. It's a great place to hear the trees talking.

Awesome. Thats where I would go to get away from it. Sounds like you do...



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by LilDudeissocool
reply to post by intrptr
 


I guess the piece produced by the tree depends on where the crosscut is made, huh?

Maybe I misunderstood you but I think those were two different trees. And you could be right, maybe a trees early life sounds different than later. Wonder what a branch higher up sounds like? Or a root?



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by TheEnlightenedOne
I just closed my eyes and listened to the music composed by the tree rings and, was it just me or did it sound as if the tree was in agony the whole time of its life?

Not just you. Does sound forceful. They are made of harder stuff than us. They can take it?


Did anyone else get goosebumps?

Hmmm... interesting. You have a sense there, you know? Although just a translation of sorts, it is a language closer to our heart and so moves us. Music is universal in that way. And they make their own music too. A forest in a breeze groans and creaks, sings in the wind. When they are cut down, they die horribly. The sound wrenches my heart.

Thanks for sharing the insight.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr

Originally posted by LilDudeissocool
reply to post by intrptr
 


I guess the piece produced by the tree depends on where the crosscut is made, huh?

Maybe I misunderstood you but I think those were two different trees. And you could be right, maybe a trees early life sounds different than later. Wonder what a branch higher up sounds like? Or a root?


What I am alluding to is when the rings around the branch are interpreted with music there is a directional change in the music. Above and below the branch what would the music sound like? Definitely now directional change made we can assume.

If I scratch a record and the nettle skips because of the scratch when the record is played the next time does the skip then become apart of the music or separate from what was originally recorded?

In other words if the branch never grew where it did would it still make music?

The answer would be yes I imagine. With this method of musical interpretation cracks in a highway could even be played to create music. Anything with repetitious sequences natural or man made.

Background radiation leftover from the Big Bang is said play what sounds like Bach after all.


This is the root of my question, is this something universal or unique?

What do you think?



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by LilDudeissocool
 


With this method of musical interpretation cracks in a highway could even be played to create music. Anything with repetitious sequences natural or man made.

Background radiation leftover from the Big Bang is said play what sounds like Bach after all.

This is the root of my question, is this something universal or unique?

Or river flow, waves, sand dunes. Earlier somebody wondered what the rings of Saturn would sound like. I think patterns do repeat. Like Fractals, spirals, and spheres. Both universal and each uniquely formed.

I don't know how many tree ring "albums" there are...





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