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Anyone know about coins?

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posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 11:28 PM
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found this penny, it's a 1990 penny with no marks such as D or P or S, it looks different from all the other pennies, even the color is off. Anyone know if this is a rare proof penny that found it's way into circulation.

here is a pic next to a penny I found closest in years, 1990 and then the 1993 just to show the difference.

Thanks :-)






posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by hapablab
 


That is a pretty rare proof penny. Yours just happens to be in pretty bad shape (for a coin collector)...

Could still be worth a few hundred bucks... take it to a local coin dealer to have it looked at.

Too bad you didn't have an uncirculated one... could be worth up to a thousand bucks in flawless condition...

For future reference... all proofs have that shiny, frosty, cloudy color to them.

Go have it checked out... you have a good find.

Also, the Philadelphia mints that year didn't have a mark on them, and only the San Fransisco proofs are the valuable ones without the mint mark.

Still, looks promising, and if it's a SF, you found a good one. Need to have it checked out, I only really deal in American silver and ancient coins

edit on 1-2-2012 by YouAreLiedTo because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-2-2012 by YouAreLiedTo because: Edit for spelling and city clarification...



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by YouAreLiedTo
 


really??, OMG it does have that frosty sheen to it, wow I will have it checked out, how awesome!!, I was going thru my purse and found one of those buffalo nickels, and decided for the fun of it to look thru the pennies and that one caught my eye, it really looks different from all the others! even a few hundred heck even a hundred is great lol!!
Thank you for your input, you just made my night :-)!!
edit on 1-2-2012 by hapablab because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by hapablab
 

Sorry about popping balloons and all...

penny mint marks

The mint mark on a US penny is just below the date, to the right of the portrait of Abraham Lincoln. A "D" means that the penny was produced in Denver and an "S" means that it was produced in San Francisco. No mint mark at all means that it was produced in Philadelphia.
On a Lincoln head cent, it is directly under the date. If there is NO mint mark, then that means that the penny was minted in Philadelphia, but the coin books will refer to it as say, a 1987P, given that everybody understands that there is NO actual "P" on the coin. "S" = San Francisco "D" = Denver


Read more: wiki.answers.com...

If you have a mind to search for pennies that are worth more than a cent, there are good references on line to help you identify more valuable ones. Since most people don't look close at pennies they may receive as change there are still good pickings to be had. You have plenty of competition...



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by hapablab
 


Lincoln memorial cents, struck from 1959 to date can be graded . As well as all prior.
I would suggest you visit your local library, or purchase a book affiliated
with the American Numismatic Association.

Current pennies and nickels are illegal to melt for metal value.
Current pennies are not blanks of solid copper.
Their alloy content reduces their speculative value to "Mint Errors" or "Sentimental" value.

You are taking "luster" into consideration for a modern alloy coin. That is subjective.

In the realm of coin collection, it is condition,condition,condition.
If you had a Modern Proof Coin, it would be encased and never circulated.
If you received this coin in circulation, it is no longer "Proof".
Hope my reply proves helpful. Don't give up.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 11:51 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by hapablab
 

Sorry about popping balloons and all...

penny mint marks

The mint mark on a US penny is just below the date, to the right of the portrait of Abraham Lincoln. A "D" means that the penny was produced in Denver and an "S" means that it was produced in San Francisco. No mint mark at all means that it was produced in Philadelphia.
On a Lincoln head cent, it is directly under the date. If there is NO mint mark, then that means that the penny was minted in Philadelphia, but the coin books will refer to it as say, a 1987P, given that everybody understands that there is NO actual "P" on the coin. "S" = San Francisco "D" = Denver


Read more: wiki.answers.com...

If you have a mind to search for pennies that are worth more than a cent, there are good references on line to help you identify more valuable ones. Since most people don't look close at pennies they may receive as change there are still good pickings to be had. You have plenty of competition...


Sorry to dispute your info...

But it's the color that sets this coin apart... not that lack of the mint mark. I already covered the possibility of a Phili coin.

All proofs have a distinctive color...



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by Wildmanimal
 


it does help, thank you I appreciate it :-)



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


Thank you for the input!! :-)

Thanks to all of you, actually after finding that I am taking a liking to this coin collecting!! lol. wanna look thru more lol



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by YouAreLiedTo
 

Okay... no dispute... except:


It should have a Frosted appearance on the raised portion of the image for it to be a proof. Proof cents are specially made; they have a cameo image and thicker copper plating than the business strike coin.

more on 1990 penny

Just thought the plating looked thin and the frost distinction between the raised image and background were negligible. I am not an expert, by the way.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 12:15 AM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by YouAreLiedTo
 

Okay... no dispute... except:


It should have a Frosted appearance on the raised portion of the image for it to be a proof. Proof cents are specially made; they have a cameo image and thicker copper plating than the business strike coin.

more on 1990 penny

Just thought the plating looked thin and the frost distinction between the raised image and background were negligible. I am not an expert, by the way.


oh wow, great link! thanks a ton, you are right about it being thin, it has a sheen to it and its color, even lincoln looks different, hold the penny up to others and it looks different but whose to say it hasn't been thru the ringer and ended up like that lol. T



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 12:18 AM
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I just went through a big old container of pennies that we had been collecting for years. I saw a segment on the news that said that all pennies minted before 1983 are mostly copper, and based on the price of copper, they are technically worth 2.4 cents each. All pennies minted 1983 and after are mostly a zinc alloy and are only worth the face value of 1 cent.

I found quite a few older pennies, and they feel heavier than the newer pennies. The oldest one in the jar I found was from 1920.

Of course, as has been pointed out by another poster, it is illegal to melt down the older pennies for the copper, but there is talk of taking the pennies out of circulation, which would mean that they could be melted down at that time.

I also found, in one of my older daughter's junk boxes, a Queen Catherine Russian coin dated 1773, all copper, and completely real (known as the "manhole cover"). It is the oldest thing I have besides the rocks in my yard. She claimed an old boyfriend gave it to her. It's worth around 45 bucks, which isn't much, but to me, it is the value of holding something that old, and thinking about all the hands it has passed through in 237 years. How many wars and revolutions has it been through?

Coins are actually very interesting when you start to learn about them, aren't they?



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by hapablab
 


oh wow, great link! thanks a ton, you are right about it being thin, it has a sheen to it and its color, even lincoln looks different, hold the penny up to others and it looks different but whose to say it hasn't been thru the ringer and ended up like that lol. T

Can't tell from here. That guy will evaluate on line for you if you send him a pic... who knows? If you take it to a coin store, don't let them take it in back "real quick" (where they switch it on you)... Don't let it out of your sight!
Happy hunting...



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 01:27 AM
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Originally posted by FissionSurplus
I just went through a big old container of pennies that we had been collecting for years. I saw a segment on the news that said that all pennies minted before 1983 are mostly copper, and based on the price of copper, they are technically worth 2.4 cents each. All pennies minted 1983 and after are mostly a zinc alloy and are only worth the face value of 1 cent.

I found quite a few older pennies, and they feel heavier than the newer pennies. The oldest one in the jar I found was from 1920.

Of course, as has been pointed out by another poster, it is illegal to melt down the older pennies for the copper, but there is talk of taking the pennies out of circulation, which would mean that they could be melted down at that time.

I also found, in one of my older daughter's junk boxes, a Queen Catherine Russian coin dated 1773, all copper, and completely real (known as the "manhole cover"). It is the oldest thing I have besides the rocks in my yard. She claimed an old boyfriend gave it to her. It's worth around 45 bucks, which isn't much, but to me, it is the value of holding something that old, and thinking about all the hands it has passed through in 237 years. How many wars and revolutions has it been through?

Coins are actually very interesting when you start to learn about them, aren't they?


ooh fascinating, Im like you, I wouldn't be able to ever sell that 237 year old coin, unless it could buy me a house, other then that its treasured, like you said it has been passed down for so many years, if it could talk the stories it would tell!. and you got it they are actually very intersting, I am gonna go thru all my pennies and coins, you never know. thanks for sharing :-)
edit on 2-2-2012 by hapablab because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 01:31 AM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by hapablab
 


oh wow, great link! thanks a ton, you are right about it being thin, it has a sheen to it and its color, even lincoln looks different, hold the penny up to others and it looks different but whose to say it hasn't been thru the ringer and ended up like that lol. T

Can't tell from here. That guy will evaluate on line for you if you send him a pic... who knows? If you take it to a coin store, don't let them take it in back "real quick" (where they switch it on you)... Don't let it out of your sight!
Happy hunting...


OH I didn't know he could evaluate too, I will send the pic and thanks for that tip, I probably would of let it get taken in the back real quick, I have been fooled before (I've been called naive) lol. This is why I love this site, thanks for all the help :-)

also did I spell naive wrong lol



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