Vibration Question

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posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 08:41 PM
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I was waiting around for my class to start today and was hitting some type of pipe railing and it was vibrating pretty fast. Kinda like when you hit a tuning fork and you can kinda see threw it cause it's never staying in one stop long enough. If you got something vibrating fast enough would you be able to vibrate it out of the visible spectrum?




posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 08:43 PM
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The issue here is that the eyes can't keep up.

An animal with more powerful vision might see it not so blurry



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 08:55 PM
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reply to post by Swizzy
 


But to a human's eyesight could it be possible? I dont wanna say invisible but something close to that. So that you would seem like a heatwave or a blur in the air.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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John Hutchinson researched extreme vibrations and their effect on various things...google Hutchinson effect and check it out, he's the dude with the long hair if I remember correctly



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by Brandon88
 




If you got something vibrating fast enough would you be able to vibrate it out of the visible spectrum?


Nope, it would look like every piece of solid matter you can see. WE are vibrating so fast that we appear still and solid, but take a mind altering chemical, and you can see the walls and solid matter vibrating like that tuning fork.

edit on 1-2-2012 by JibbyJedi because: tyops



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:21 PM
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reply to post by JibbyJedi
 


Can you expand on that.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:27 PM
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reply to post by Brandon88
 


I'm a science amateur, but think about the propeller of an aeroplane when it spins at it's fastest it becomes very hard to see as the image 'blurs'. Im not 100% certain but I think that it becomes hard to see as the human eye/brain cannot 'process?' the light fast enough. As I said I'm a science amateur, can anyone else clarify/debunk?
edit on 1-2-2012 by lifeissacred because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:29 PM
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if you were to have a camera set up with a very high frames per second rate then watch it in slow motion, you would see it moving, it wouldn't disappear, it's still physical



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:33 PM
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Originally posted by JibbyJedi
reply to post by Brandon88
 




If you got something vibrating fast enough would you be able to vibrate it out of the visible spectrum?


Nope, it would look like every piece of solid matter you can see. WE are vibrating so fast that we appear still and solid, but take a mild altering chemical, and you can see the walls and solid matter vibrating that that tuning fork.


kind of opposite of what OP's thinking ironically. weird how it works like that. vibrates microscopically so fast it gives the illusion of something solid.

so in a way you'd have to anti-vibrate something, whatever that means/does/is lol...



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by Brandon88
reply to post by JibbyJedi
 


Can you expand on that.


I can try.

We, 3D matter within visible light, all are vibrating at the same rate. There is far more things (matter) we can't see because it's vibrating at a different rate outside the visible spectrum range. Banging the tuning fork is "slightly" altering the vibratory rate of the object, affecting it's solid appearance for a short time but not enough to take it out of human visible light range.

It's said that humans can basically see 0.005% of the entire visible light spectrum, which leaves TONS invisible to our sight, all vibrating at ranges beyond our abilities to decode.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by yourmaker
 


I know the item would still be there you wouldn't be able to make it to where you could put your hand through it or anything like that. Just so that you couldn't see it without electronic aid like creating a device for a stealth vehicle.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by JibbyJedi
 


I understand the basics around it now thank you for the info. But is it possible to create a device that could keep an item vibrating at a rate which we cant view?



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:51 PM
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Originally posted by Brandon88
reply to post by JibbyJedi
 


I understand the basics around it now thank you for the info. But is it possible to create a device that could keep an item vibrating at a rate which we cant view?


If you believe the Philadelphia Experiment story was real, then Yes. I personally believe we've gone far beyond the science of those days.


Crew members supposedly complained of severe nausea afterwards. Also, it is said that when the ship reappeared, some sailors were embedded in the metal structures of the ship, including one sailor who ended up on a deck level below that where he began, and had his hand embedded in the steel hull of the ship.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:53 PM
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reply to post by Brandon88
 


No it's not possible. The movements you observed were blurred because the human brain cannot process what we see fast enough. If something looks 'see through' at the edges when it vibrates it's because it is quickly moving back and forth and once it moves fast enough your brain essentially remembers the light from behind the object. I assume if something moves fast enough across your field of vision you won't see it, but if something vibrates in the same spot? You'd still see it, it won't disappear.
edit on 1-2-2012 by lifeissacred because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 05:09 AM
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Originally posted by JibbyJedi
It's said that humans can basically see 0.005% of the entire visible light spectrum, which leaves TONS invisible to our sight, all vibrating at ranges beyond our abilities to decode.


Surely you mean we can see 0.005% of the electromagnetic spectrum. As what we call the visible spectrum is anthropomorphic, we can see 100% of the visible spectrum, hence us calling it visible.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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Originally posted by lifeissacred
No it's not possible. The movements you observed were blurred because the human brain cannot process what we see fast enough. If something looks 'see through' at the edges when it vibrates it's because it is quickly moving back and forth and once it moves fast enough your brain essentially remembers the light from behind the object. I assume if something moves fast enough across your field of vision you won't see it, but if something vibrates in the same spot? You'd still see it, it won't disappear.
Yes and no.

If something is at the edge of visibility when it's still, like a thin strand the size of a human hair, once you start vibrating it, you may not be be to see it at all. But I liked your propeller example. That's something that is large enough to see even when it's moving too fast to see it clearly.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by Brandon88
I was waiting around for my class to start today and was hitting some type of pipe railing and it was vibrating pretty fast. Kinda like when you hit a tuning fork and you can kinda see threw it cause it's never staying in one stop long enough. If you got something vibrating fast enough would you be able to vibrate it out of the visible spectrum?


In short, yes, vibrate the material object fast enough, it will disappear from the visible. All material is composed of Atoms, all Atoms vibrate at a specific weight.
How Atoms Work

Atomic Structure

Atom Builder





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