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What Martial Art Is Right For You? Which Ones Are Effective? What Style TO Learn?

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posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by stinka

Originally posted by PaxVeritas
I'm gonna be a fanboy here and say that I can't express enough how I think to really get an introduction into real world applications of self defense I would definitely have to say

Paul Vunak

.

From his early stuff to his most recent, it covers practically every situation. it's the most complete system I've seen.

Google him, you won't regret it.


Will check him out.

Are you a fan of the legend that is Bas Rutten ?


Bas Rutten is a real street fighter. His main study is Pancrase which I highly recommend.

Bas Rutten has size though and strength most don't have. But as a fighter he's one of the only guys I would follow out of the whole UFC notables. The other would be the Gracies and some founders. But Bas is probably my top.




posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by stinka
 


Well said Stinka... down is dead... or loser... he who holds the high ground almost always wins the battle.. basic rule of war



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by PaxVeritas

I forgot to write Vale Tudo in my OP....damnit.


Don't worry. It goes without say considering it was essentially a bloodier precursor for MMA as it is today.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:02 PM
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Originally posted by PaxVeritas

Originally posted by stinka

Originally posted by PaxVeritas
I'm gonna be a fanboy here and say that I can't express enough how I think to really get an introduction into real world applications of self defense I would definitely have to say

Paul Vunak

.

From his early stuff to his most recent, it covers practically every situation. it's the most complete system I've seen.

Google him, you won't regret it.


Will check him out.

Are you a fan of the legend that is Bas Rutten ?


Bas Rutten is a real street fighter. His main study is Pancrase which I highly recommend.

Bas Rutten has size though and strength most don't have. But as a fighter he's one of the only guys I would follow out of the whole UFC notables. The other would be the Gracies and some founders. But Bas is probably my top.


Bas' vids are some of the first I ever watched and by god if he didn't like to dish out a kick to the groin lmao

I never got to train with Bas personally but I did get to with Royce Gracie...the guy was as much a legend as I've ever heard, he's so calm and peaceful and just an all around respectful person, he even wore our own school shirt over his own Gracie line. He showed us some real basic stuff that is supremely efficient, which is what most people forget is that the simplest is usually the most effective.

Kenny Florian of the UFC lightweight division came down and gave a seminar and he was a really chill guy as well and also a well rounded martial artist. He had just gotten back from the Fairtex camps out in Thailand and had come in to show us his new blended style (he was a heavy BJJ based fighter beforehand for those who havent followed him). Great guy and very informative and a menace to hold the thai pads for lol.

I hate how some people equate the UFC fighters with the same sick mindset the Fertitas and Dana White have, which is a total "money money money" kinda mindset. Most of these fighters are just using their skills in the only well known and best paid arena there is, making money the best way they've trained for,..UFC has a monopoly on this MMA game now since Pride and most others have either died or been bought out. I know their suckling off the teat but if you trained your ass off everyday you'd be jumping at the chance to let it pay off with a nice check rather then having a black eye and a concussion for your only reward.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by OldCurmudgeon
reply to post by stinka
 


Well said Stinka... down is dead... or loser... he who holds the high ground almost always wins the battle.. basic rule of war


Anakin found out the hard way:



@OP: Yeah, Bas is a legend:



Open hand slap!



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by rexusdiablos
 


Bas! Love that guy.
I spent a few years bouncing at a local joint and I gotta say, nothing sobers up a riled drunk like a slap across the cheek.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by rexusdiablos
 


I never watched that one... what happened?



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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dangada dangada dang



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:19 PM
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most of these styles are for a basic style of person.
I think the best martial arts style is the one you create yourself out of experience and extreme intent.

sure we can use ju jitsu or karate, but it is merely giving names to natural human defenses.
we need to dig deeper and look at the science and physics of fighting, beyond the names.
see the cause and effect. fighting can either be, I act therefore you react, or I react because you act

those fighting disiplines limit you in a way, you aren't able to use a natural technique if it remains hidden.
out of sight, out of mind.


now I want to use this video as an example. watch from :20 - :50


beyond the obvious comical physics of when he hits them, it touches on a very very important fighting style format.
speed and precision. the moves are literally last second, and perfectly executed. only used because they had to.
that is the essence of fighting. using as little effort while inflicting maximum damage.

again, just an example. 1:35 to end, using natural in the moment techniques.




edit on 1-2-2012 by yourmaker because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:28 PM
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I would say pick one style and stick to it.

my sensi is almost 83, he got his 5th dan of Gichin Funakoshi.

he is still developing his style now and coming up with new ideas as to how improve.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:40 PM
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I know this one guy , was a real bad arse. He worked in a bar as bouncer, and this little hillbilly guy came in, the bad arse with all the muscles beat the crap out of the little hillbilly, totally humiliated him and threw him out of the bar.
He was tough, bad, cool, that is till the little hillbilly came back in and ballpeened him in the head. Now he's cool as hell when the foxie nurse comes in and wipes his arse and changes his diaper.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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I laugh at some of Bas' stuff because I think like he does and what he's saying is what I'm thinking.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by PaxVeritas
 


Being a martial art instructor and spending many years of studying the arts, I have found through my encounters that all arts have their strengths and weaknesses. I am an instructor in Muay Thai and Wing Chun (Ving Tsun) and study Capoeira, Kung Fu, Judo, Wrestling, Bushido, Iaido, Akido, Karate, Escrima/Kale sticks, and Taekwondo.

IMO, I have found what is important is the individual who uses the art. They find what works for their particular body structure and frame of mind. All martial arts has their references, kata, or dictionary of moves a.k.a techniques but it is how the user puts it together and executes it. All martial arts deals with the human body and have the importance of feeling or having a sensitivity to ones body as well as some one else. It is important to understand the economy of motion/energy in both directing, redirecting, and transferring. all arts is based on balance, structure consisting of angles, and radial movements. It is also about timing, adapting, controlling fear, not over thinking, breathing, and being in the moment. A great material to read is the last chapter in the book The Zen Of Archery

There are some important tips about controlling fear and rage. One way to control it is to breath and quite/calm the mind. Meditation and yoga is a powerful tool to help with this avenue. Another important aspect is to find the energy you would get from imagining your loved ones being in jeopardy, suffering, or being killed. This is energy you can get a lot of strength and power from and it is also something you can turn on and off. This out energy is powerful enough to allow one to be decisive and take action with allowing morals to cause one to hesitate.

What I find interesting is I find myself so compelled to learn all these arts and to teach it and pass on the knowledge to eager, devoted, and passionate students. I find myself wanting to simplify the teaching of it. I want to pass the wisdom to many and having them create new art from it thus taking it to new levels. I expect nothing in return but I am filled with joy when I find out that my teachings and passing of knowledge really helped them. I feel it is some sort of calling and preparation for something that may be on the horizon. God forbid if I have to use any of it but I am thankful I never had to.
edit on 1-2-2012 by unite_life because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:48 PM
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If I were to learn anything it would be BJJ to hone my ground skills. I would like to go back into studying Goshin Jutsu (Okinawan karate) for striking and stand up since it is influenced by Aikido, shotokan, judo, shaolin kuntao and another style that I've forgotten. But the form of Goshin I learned was brutal. At the white belt level we were required to know the points of vulnerability, which is very, very important for ending physical confrontation quickly. Groin kicks, knee kicks, eye and throat gouges and wrist locks were a staples and some of the very first things learned and are the foundation for the style. As a matter of fact, Billy Blanks (who is from Erie btw) learned the majority of his hand techniques from grandmaster Durant. This is when Billy had "shrimp" embroidered on the back of his gi. In One of Billy Blanks movies (where he plays a high school janitor) you can see a huge Goshin Jutsu influence when he's training.
edit on 1-2-2012 by kimish because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by unite_life
 
What about when they get on a big ego trip like so many do.
Prance ago around like the big cock on the block.
They miss the being humble part.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by Frontkjemper
reply to post by PaxVeritas
 



I wanted something that would just 'work'. I don't need fancy spinning kicks or whatnot. All I wanted was something that would allow me to take down my aggressor in the least amount of time. My work pulls me in a lot of close spaces so being able to take someone down in a narrow hallway was a big plus. That's when I came across Systema. The Russian fighting style used by their soldiers.


Very good system and the main one I was going to mention. I haven't seen any one mention the one equalizer of any street type fight. "Energy", Using most other systems you tire very rapidly. Well using the formal most of MOST other systems in the short term is effective. If you are in a brawl with some one who is in better shape you will tire rapidly and all style goes out the window.

The beauty of Systema is it conserves energy allowing you to not only beat down you opponent but out last him as well. If after the fight is over you still have energy and wind, when said bad guys buddy show up you can the be able to fight more or preferably flight. It is hard to find a proper instructor in most areas of the U.S. There is a stigma attached to most things Russian today because of the past.
edit on 1-2-2012 by angryamerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by googolplex
 


you are right about the ego and that is something no one can teach a student. I try to show my students this through my actions. There is an unspeakable strength and a sense confidence to one who practices humility, humbleness, and doing good deeds. This coincides with what I mentioned about the individuals frame of mind. If they are not able to recognize the ego then they have not won the battle with themselves. If they live in this delusional mind set, they will learn it the hard way then they fall off the high horse. Most of the time the ego sets in when it gets the individual thinking they have mastered an art and have learned everything they have to know about it, but something happens in life to help one see that we are always learning. As long as we are alive and encountering new moments, we will always learn. We are all teachers and students in this way of life.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 05:32 PM
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I choose wing chun...why? So I can fight 10 black belts at the same time....and beat them.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 05:38 PM
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I have being doing combative sports for a loooooooooong time. A combination of killer instinct, western boxing, kicking defense, kicks to the pills, head butts, biting, eye gouging, wrestling, subs and steroids has time and again proven to be the most effective out of competition.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 05:38 PM
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.... It's not the style, it is the practicioner. Steven Seagal is one of my favorites. He's a bonafide bad ass.

www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com...

I've always wondered why the majority of the Masters, Sokes. Dai Soke, sifus and Shihans that I have met always had big guts lol.
I've only learned a little bit of AIkido but I do love it. Props to Aiki Jutsu as well.
edit on 1-2-2012 by kimish because: (no reason given)



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