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How To Trap a Nuisance Bird?

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posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:10 PM
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This crazy robin bird has been attacking my house for 10 years and it's constant loud banging from dusk till dawn. He just started banging on my windows and cars yesterday, and will not stop till about the end of May. He will attack anything with his reflection on it, thinking it's another male. I've tried putting pictures, owls, and balloons in front of the windows but nothing seems to help. He is banging on all the windows on my house. I need to trap this bird because he is a complete nuisance, and is damaging my house and cars, and pooping everywhere. Any ideas on how to trap a robin bird. I'm not going to kill him, just would like release him many miles away from my home.




posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:15 PM
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Robins are beautiful birds poor bugger is disorientated help him out i hate captive animals hes a young bird not come to terms yet with glass you'd rue the day the day birds died God forbid



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:18 PM
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1) strobe light

2) motion detecter sprinkler

3) pour spices everywhere he chills , spices and sauces . in a bird feeder..

4) www.pestnoproblem.com...

5) www.bird-x.com...

6) www.howtogetridofstuff.com...


bb guns don't kill ! just show them quick adaptation to a very dangerous area



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by ambient moon
 


I would say to get or build a pigeon trap like this:




Then just go up on top of your house at night. Put a little peanut butter and seeds in a ball in the center of the trap. You should catch that robin. Then you will have to take him at least a couple hundred miles away to keep him from coming back to your place.
edit on 1/30/2012 by InFriNiTee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:23 PM
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I had a Red Cardinal that would do the same thing, went on for about 2 years and then one day I saw him flying around with a female cardinal and he stopped attacking my windows.

It didn't really bother me so I never tried to trap him or deter him, but an old trick that works with some birds is to hang up something thats shiny and aluminum, like a disposable pie plate. Works great to scare off nuisance crows, not sure about other birds though.

Trapping a bird and moving it to a new location could severely stress it, maybe even kill it, but again it depends on the species.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:25 PM
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The reason I say to use peanut butter and seeds is because robins don't typically look for worms in frozen ground (If it is frozen in the ground where you are). They will search for any source of protein in the wintertime. Food is always more important than trying to attack its own reflection.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:26 PM
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10 years is pretty old for a robin. If you've waited this long to do something, just wait a little longer - his time bugging you is likely very short.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:28 PM
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maybe a cardboard cut out of a perched hawk or something like that.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:33 PM
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I'm not sure if you've tried the ultrasonic bird repellants. They make some cheaper versions that are supposed to cover 1500 square feet. You would want to put those facing the windows I would think



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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Robins are very territorial.Maybe find its nest and carefully remove it.Then again,i have seen birds torment cats behind a window.Bluejays hate robins,maybe put a pic on the window for the pesky little one....just a thought,good luck.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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According to Wikipedia, the average lifespan of a robin is two years.

Only 25 percent survive their first year. The longevity record for a wild robin is 14 years.

Chances are he won't be back next year, so just let him have his fun.... He is probably senile.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:37 PM
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reply to post by InFriNiTee
 


I will try using a pigeon trap, and place it on the deck. The ground isn't frozen here, but I will give peanut butter a try. Hopefully that will work. Thanks



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:42 PM
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reply to post by AwakeinNM
 


Hopefully it's the same bird.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:45 PM
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Originally posted by ambient moon
reply to post by InFriNiTee
 


I will try using a pigeon trap, and place it on the deck. The ground isn't frozen here, but I will give peanut butter a try. Hopefully that will work. Thanks


I wouldn't try taking him 200 miles away to start with. Just take the robin about 25 miles away and try to put him near grain bins by the railroad tracks, or near a farmer's land if that's a possiblilty. The only downside to it is hopefully the robin doesn't start attacking the farmer's windows, because we know what will happen then

edit on 1/30/2012 by InFriNiTee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:47 PM
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posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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Maybe your robin has a family, and they're continuing the tradition


I have a woodpecker that gets on my house now and then, the dogs all start barking and looking at me, so I have to go chase it away. I can't get rid of him though, he lives in the trees close to the house, and I've seen families of woodpeckers every year. I think they teach their young to do the same thing.

Every summer I have to train another woodpecker to stay off the house.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by ambient moon
 


Good luck getting rid of the pest! I appreciate the humane way of doing it. For being that old, I think he deserves to live as long as he can. Perhaps by moving him closer to a food source that is away from your property he will find a mate to live out the rest of his life with. Since he's been fighting himself all these years, I think he's pretty tough


Edit: You might follow him if you can to check if he does have a nest, but if he doesn't have a mate there it wouldn't hurt to move him near some fields or grain bins.
edit on 1/30/2012 by InFriNiTee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:28 PM
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I would try the peanut butter first, because that's the best mouse bait in the world. If that doesn't work, try placing some fresh fruit in there. I did find this website that talks about what to feed them:

Wintertime Robin Food


A Robin's Favorite Winter Foods In winter robins concentrate on berry bushes, trees and vines, like the bittersweet vine above. (On warm days, though, you might spot a robin running on lawns, searching for worms!) Winter robins eat berries, other fruits, and seeds they find on shrubs, trees, and vines. If robins happen to overwinter near you, you can offer them frozen or fresh fruit. They'll go for apple slices, raisins, blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and cherries


I do stand corrected, but I wold still try the peanut butter just to see how it works!


Birdseed? No Thanks! Did you ever wonder why it's hard to attract robins to a bird feeder? Most robins have simply never eaten at a feeder before, so they lack the experience to know what feeders are for. And even the hungriest robin would never eat birdseed. During autumn, robins have so much natural food available that they don't need handouts. But robins overwintering in northern states and provinces are becoming more and more common. (Two reasons: Because the whole North American population of robins is increasing, and because on average, winters are becoming milder.) Your birdfeeders can help the robins that remain in the north instead of taking the Journey South! Robins like invertebrates, such as worms and insects. Where will you get them in winter? Mealworms (the larvae of a plain black beetle) are the best choice, and they're easy to find. You can buy mealworms at pet stores or on the Internet.


Please give us an update down the road.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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I suggest you trap a Bat first, then the Robin should come to his rescue.


Sorry couldn't resist.

Do you put any food out for it, perhaps a bird table with a wooden block for it to peck at.

Buy a cat.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 11:19 PM
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Originally posted by ambient moon
reply to post by AwakeinNM
 


Hopefully it's the same bird.


Put a poster of a big bird of prey in the window he smacks into. I bet he stops that behavior quick.



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