It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Fungi Discovered In The Amazon Will Eat Your Plastic

page: 1
23
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:
+2 more 
posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 05:08 PM
link   
www.fastcoexist.com...

so i guess we just found a certain type of fungi that feeds and can survive on a diet of plastics Pestalotiopsis microspora is according to the source the first type of fungus that eats plastic in this way and this might end up being if not a solution but at least a help in reducing plastic waste around the globe or even potentaly being used on the pacific garbage patch.

assuming its safe and can grow in many different environments this could be a key feature in any new green landfills or as a way of getting rid of some of our waste all together either way i did a search and had not seen this posted(search usually baffles me) so i figured id post this in the fragile earth forum as i could not find a date on the article i sourced so i do not know if this is new news or old news either way it was news to me i just hope we can do some tests to find out what the potential byproducts or waste the fungi could create and make sure its not gonna end up destroying civilization or being a worse problem long term but i am no scientist so that is up to them

www.apsnet.org...
articles.cnn.com...:LIVING
some other related links from apparently long ago
edit on 30-1-2012 by KilrathiLG because: add more links


webspace.yale.edu...
edit on 30-1-2012 by KilrathiLG because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 05:15 PM
link   
reply to post by KilrathiLG
 


Ohhhh that kind of plastic...
I thought they found my ex-wife!!!



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 05:20 PM
link   

The fungi, Pestalotiopsis microspora, is the first anyone has found to survive on a steady diet of polyurethane alone and--even more surprising--do this in an anaerobic (oxygen-free) environment that is close to the condition at the bottom of a landfill.

Source


Make you wonder what it ate before we invented plastic to feed it.



It sounds great but, I hope they find a way to confine it to the landfills. Wouldn't want the good stuff that I'm still using to get eaten up if this stuff gets loose.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 05:24 PM
link   
Nice post
I often think about how many cures we've destroyed or lost through our history, but also about hopefull rediscovery and new ones like this
Hopefully there's many ways out there for us to become more symbiotic with the world
A small example a bacteria that lives off plaque - no need to clean teeth
It's something we are only just starting to study seriously



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 05:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by FortAnthem

The fungi, Pestalotiopsis microspora, is the first anyone has found to survive on a steady diet of polyurethane alone and--even more surprising--do this in an anaerobic (oxygen-free) environment that is close to the condition at the bottom of a landfill.

Source


Make you wonder what it ate before we invented plastic to feed it.



It sounds great but, I hope they find a way to confine it to the landfills. Wouldn't want the good stuff that I'm still using to get eaten up if this stuff gets loose.


That is a great point, what if we make so much of this stuff to help our landfills and some of it gets out and the next thing you know, you have it in your home.

Honey, why is the TV melting?



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 05:30 PM
link   
reply to post by FortAnthem
 


that is a good point as its native and discovered in the amazon region perhaps some of the sap of trees replicated the chemical make up of plastic and thats what they ate or it could be nature responding to our overproduction of plastics as a way to reduce pollution and waste in her own way,either way i think it needs to be studied and if safe utilized to get rid of some of the trash on this planet and the oceans if it can be adapted to work in a briney environment



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 05:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Neocrusader
 


interesting idea on the plaque eating bacteria almost like dentics from far scape(NEVER swallow a dentic!)

i also think its sad that we dont even know what cures or other potental usefull plants we have just killed off in the rainforest,im hoping that this isnt an old fungi but a new reaction from nature to try to clean up the place on its own because not all the humans are on the same level of the green bandwagon thank you for your reply



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 05:34 PM
link   
Remember the car in back to the future. He fills it up with rubbish.

' where we're going , we won't need roads ' !!



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 05:49 PM
link   
reply to post by pot8er
 


haha yeah best case scenario what ends up happening is they end up being safe eat all forms of plastic and poop out petroleum that burns cleaner or something not likely but hey we can dream cant we?

blog.nothingbutsoftware.com... that source seems to clarify that the fungi does not need oxygen to live in a polyurethane medium with what my limited understandigns of how science works means that it could be used to disolve plastics under water as well as on the surface
edit on 30-1-2012 by KilrathiLG because: (no reason given)


aem.asm.org... and that seems to explain alot more about it but is waaaaay over my head so any one of you that is science prone might like it as well
edit on 30-1-2012 by KilrathiLG because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 06:39 PM
link   
Seriously this is amazing! Man is so ignorant thinking that we can kill nature. Nature ALWAYS finds a way to sustain itself and it's doing a damn good job. We can't permanently mess it up even if we tried, it would kill us all before we even came close. Just my $0.02.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 06:52 PM
link   
reply to post by KilrathiLG
 


I'd really love to drop this lovepack on a typical american city, just imagine the fun!
anyway. i think it has a knack for saving us from turning this planet into a great chunk of plastic, but think of the damage it can cause. if it actually somehow made it's way into a big city, eventually spreading out and rotting away all that nondegradable crap we make. what currently got me thinkin' is that if earth is a living organism, then it certainly felt all of it, and made it's response through this little b_tch. anyway. i can't wait to see plastic dumpsites disappear.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 06:55 PM
link   
reply to post by jar11
 


i hope that some day we can find some form of ballance where between us and nature we stop screwing the planet whole sale and if we can better use nature to make our lives better it makes sense to make these potental life savers be protected from deforestation and harm (example say we eradicated all of this plant before inventing plastic we never would have known what we were destroying at the time becuse what it needed to do for us was not a problem) if that makes any sense



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 06:56 PM
link   
reply to post by Narcissous
 


you bring up a good point but so far we have only created it in labs outside of the amazon and i dont think fungus lives well in all types of climates so it dont think its a universal solve all problem and definatly warrents further research



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:00 PM
link   
reply to post by KilrathiLG
 


oh no.....

Think about how much plastic we have around this world.

This thing, if introduced is going to spread and grow like wildfire....well maybe not quite as fast but still at a good rate.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:17 PM
link   
No doubt the governments biological weapon's labs will be studying this.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:18 PM
link   
In the city I live, all of our potable water, sanitary collection, and storm water collection pipes are made of plastics, including the pipes that collect the leachate from the waste landfills.
[crazyfacetiousness]Imagine if it was used to control plastic in the landfill and it gets into the sanitary system via leachate drainage and eats all the pipes? This fungi if in the wrong hands could be used as a terrorist weapon to destroy modern society as we know it...[/crazyfacetiousness]



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:22 PM
link   
....and here I was hoping to become a plastic miner when we run out of fossil fuels.

Damn.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:27 PM
link   
I’m hoping they have it quarantined because it really could be dangerous. Recently, introduced foreign “bodies” have caused damage and destruction. I’m thinking Zebra Mussels, Harlequin (Lady) bug, Snake head fish, Gorse plant:

www.gcrio.org...

“in 1936, the town of Bandon, Oregon would be destroyed and eleven citizens killed by a fire propagated by gorse, a highly flammable plant introduced, seventy years earlier, from Europe? Or that dense, flammable plants such as Australian melaleuca, the so-called Australian pine, Asian cogongrass, and Brazilian pepper, introduced for roadside planting in Florida, have become costly hazards because of water loss through increased transpiration, increased fires, and blocked vision? The problem is so severe that the Florida Department of Transportation is removing 27,000 Australian pines along the Florida Turnpike.”
“The cost to taxpayers of introduced species in the U.S. was estimated, in a 1993 report of the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), to range from hundreds of millions through billions of dollars each year. These estimates do not include effects on native ecosystems, such as extinction of native species that are of no immediate economic concern.”



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by IronDogg
In the city I live, all of our potable water, sanitary collection, and storm water collection pipes are made of plastics, including the pipes that collect the leachate from the waste landfills.
[crazyfacetiousness]Imagine if it was used to control plastic in the landfill and it gets into the sanitary system via leachate drainage and eats all the pipes? This fungi if in the wrong hands could be used as a terrorist weapon to destroy modern society as we know it...[/crazyfacetiousness]


Yes, in our world of plastic, this could be a very bad idea. I'm all for getting the garbage out but hey, what stops this "fungi" when we're not using it, how fast does it "grow", what are the containment procedures? It sounds like it can live forever. Does it hibernate, is it ONLY plastic that it consumes? TOOOOO many questions I hope they can answer. And quite frankly, considering all the mistakes made in the past with non-native plant, animal and insect introductions, I don't trust them one bit BECAUSE, they just don't know until they see it in real life, after it's introduced, and then it's too damn late for many of these things. I have a very bad feeling about this.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 07:51 PM
link   
I read this Sci-Fi book years ago, can't remember the name but I'm going through my library and my 5th wheel tomorrow because I know I still have it somewhere. Anyway, a new bacteria (or something, it's been about 6 years ago) of some sort was introduced to fight some bird disease and it ended up wiping out mankind pretty much. I know, Sci-Fi...pshwaw. But think of all the things we have experienced, especially in the last 10-20 years, which were just sci-fi in the past. I know I'm rambling but I always think it's a bad idea to introduce new species to an environment. And quite frankly, it seems the smaller the species, the more dangerous it is or can be.




top topics



 
23
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join