In 2012, NASCAR Will End All Paranoia Over Global Warming Once and For All...at least for a year.

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posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 07:08 AM
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Originally posted by tonycliffs

Originally posted by SpongeBeard
reply to post by tonycliffs
 


I'm not sure how to read half of that.
Either you're making no sense, or nascar is incredibly complex.


NASCAR 'look's incredibly simple. All these cars turning left for four or five hours at 200 mph.

If you want to find out how complex NASCAR really is, try it.

And I don't mean try it all by yourself on a track. Try turning left for four or five hours at 200 mph with forty other cars around you.


It is simple

but it is simple for everyone else racing too.




posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 08:41 AM
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Originally posted by Cassius666

Originally posted by tonycliffs

Originally posted by SpongeBeard
reply to post by tonycliffs
 


I'm not sure how to read half of that.
Either you're making no sense, or nascar is incredibly complex.


NASCAR 'look's incredibly simple. All these cars turning left for four or five hours at 200 mph.

If you want to find out how complex NASCAR really is, try it.

And I don't mean try it all by yourself on a track. Try turning left for four or five hours at 200 mph with forty other cars around you.


It is simple

but it is simple for everyone else racing too.


IF NASCAR was simple, every NASCAR dad would be doing it and have a smoking hot babe on each arm, and every NASCAR mom would have a smoking hot guy on each of her arms.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 08:28 PM
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Earnhardt's crash was one of those that you, I, or NASCAR would have never expected to happen. I honestly think that his racing harness may of had something to do with it. What I believe happened was that the belts were worn and no one knew about it. Either, he did not want to tell them that the belts were bad for fear that it might have hampered his race. Or that the belt was worn just enough that it would have taken an impact to make the belt come apart like it reportedly did.

Then again, Formula One drivers thought that there cars were the safest in the world. That was until the deaths of Roland Ratzenberger and the legendary Ayrton Senna during the weekend of the San Marino Grand Prix in 1994. Those two crashes themselves also set a reorganizing of the safety regulations and protocols that the FIA had in place at the time. Two fatalites due to the wheels coming off and striking both Ratzenberger and Senna in the head. That lead to the introduction of the tire tethers in 1995/1996.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:27 PM
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reply to post by gimmefootball400
 


There's also the theory that Dale Sr. made so many enemies that....well....you get the picture.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 10:57 PM
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The idea of Dale having some enemies out on the race track is nothing new to me. I mean I was a fan of Dale Sr. after all. Among the fans, he was one of the most loved drivers out there. Among the drivers, he was well respected and he had this aura about him that nobody can really describe. I mean he may have seemed like an all out mean S.O.B. on the track. Off the track he was one of the most well liked and respected drivers to have ever put on a firesuit and a helmet. Dale was one of those individuals that you could sit down and talk with for hours. My late grandmother met Dale years ago when he was doing an appearance for Goodwrench at a local car dealership up here and he was one of the most down to Earth individuals that you could ever meet in your life. I mean he would call us at least once a week and ask how we were doing and how life was treating us. How on Earth he got our phone number is something that I will never know for as long as I live.



posted on Feb, 3 2012 @ 09:17 AM
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reply to post by gimmefootball400
 


Yep. Dale Sr. was like an assassin who smiled as he shot you.

Earnhardt and Petty were guys who brought paying crowds to the track because they were mean out there on the oval. NASCAR fans do love to see Carl Edwards shove Brad Keselowski into the wall and into a double back flip, then wait for Keselowski to pay back Carl Edewards.

That didn't mean Earnhardt and Petty were really the meanest or toughest of the small family of NASCAR drivers. That meant they got the most publicity creating the most memorable pay back wrecks.

You got to remember that a lot of the NASCAR drivers are smallish fellows. Smaller than actors, even. Shoot! I bet Jeff Gordon has to stand on a ladder to reach five foot six. Not much in a fistfight, but give Jeff Gordon seven hundred horses of power and he's as much a steering maniac as Dale Sr. or King Petty.

But I always thought there was something fishy behind the scenes the way Dale Jr. died.

Yeah, I know. If it's your time, it's your time.

Ah, well.....like JFK and Lincoln, they'll never let the cat out of the bag.



posted on Feb, 6 2012 @ 12:37 AM
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Now that you mention the tangles between Carl Edwards and Brad Keselowski. I do seem to remember one during the Nationwide Series Race at Gateway about a year or so ago. Brad's father, Bob, was one of them tough son of a guns that came up from the late model series in Wisconsin back in the 1970s and 1980s. Well when Carl wrecked Brad intentionally for the second time in 2010 with Atlanta being the first. Bob was wanting to take on Carl himself. I don't think I have ever seen a retired driver wanting to come back so badly just to get his hands on one guy.





posted on Feb, 6 2012 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by gimmefootball400
 


And who can forget the scene of 65 year old car owner Richard Childress jumping on much younger Kyle Busch, administering a number of whacks to Busch's top noggin, after Busch purposely bumped one of Childress's trucks in a Camping Series race.

Childress was fined a big bunch of money by NASCAR for embarrassing Kyle Busch so badly.



posted on Feb, 6 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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reply to post by tonycliffs
 


What most fans don't know is that Childress himself drove in, then, the Winston Cup and Grand National cars in the 1970s. Childress raced with the likes of Petty, Yarborough, Waltrip, and the Alabama Gang. Childress shouldn't have to go out and fight a driver over something stupid that the other driver did. Then again, Kyle Busch is too chicken to stand up to either one of RCR's drivers especially Harvick. Busch must have been given a lesson about not fighting Kevin Harvick by Greg Biffle. I mean Biffle knows first hand what it is like to be on the receiving end of a Kevin Harvick rampage. does the Busch Grand National race at Bristol in April of 2002 ring any bells?

Never mind that Harvick was an amateur wrestling in his high school days.



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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If you missed the 13 part series about Bowman Gray the first time around, keep watch for a tale of the good old boys still racing today, working out of their own pockets.


History Channel Series Focuses On Life At Bowman Gray
'Madhouse' To Highlight Racing Life In The Piedmont

Read more: www.wxii12.com...





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