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The Downside of Knowing

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posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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I expect most of us are familiar with the phrase, "Say what you mean, don't mean what you say." In fact, this originates from Alice in Wonderland. Incidentally, it resulted in a rather interesting conversation discussing the efficiency of conversation and vocalized concepts, where we often take for granted the ability to discern the true meaning, rather than the literal intention of whatever has been said.

And yet it seems that we have fallen in the rut of "metaphor"...that is to say, we don't take what we hear literally, so much as metaphorically, even leading to exaggeration and hyperbolic statements. I could give several examples, but there is one that I am continually drawn back to, one that, to me, has not only immediately effective repercussions regarding perspective, bu long- lasting ramifications as well.

What, you ask, could be so damaging as regards overly literal phrases? My answer: "I know ___." I can see your blank expressions. Allow me to explain. See, this happens so often that we now take it for granted, as with so many potentially disastrous mannerisms that I will not go into. Women , have yo ever heard one of your female friends say, "Oh, I know he's cheating on me. I just know it."

Then it turns out he's just been working long nights, whether it be because he's afraid he might lose the job, or he's working on a promotion, which ends up with you celebrating with a night on the town and - *GASP* getting engaged! Now...what was that you said? Oh, yes...you know, but you DIDN'T know. How does that work out? Guess again... Additionally, you say, "Oh, I KNOW she's talking s**t about me behind my back!" Then it turns out that it was someone else doing the talking, and this person who so definitely has betrayed you was trying to quell the rumors. Now how does that make you feel? How many times have you had to apologize for being wrong after you KNEW you were right?

And men, you too are guilty of this. You say, "Oh, hell, you better be ready to pay me 'cause the Giants are winning tonight." In the end: you lose $40 because you KNEW you were right. And how about this one? "Nah, the truck will be fine." Then you're late to work because along the way, the engine stalled and you had to call a tow truck.

There are countless other examples where we knew something, then were proved wrong. The only defenses are some backwards logic and feeble excuses. No, we're usually convinced we can do no wrong. Then we turn out wrong.

In fact, not only are we often proven wrong when we believe ourselves right, the only KNOWELDGE is perspective. That's right: I say it's blue, you say it's green. A computer may identify it as teal, but we boh believe we are right and the other person is wrong. Why is this?

Because we humans consistently believe, until we have led ourselves astray one too many times, that our eyes and ears are the only ones that can truly be depended upon. And yet...we don't know everything, do we? And this leads me to my ultimate point.

We don't know everything. In fact, we know nothing. We only know what our brains are being told....and those, in fact, can be fooled. Schizophrenics and dementia patients can attest to that. So next time, when you are so convinced you are right...remember:

You have one set of ears. One set of eyes. And one brain. And none are fool-proof. Arrogance is the spice of failure.

Namaste.




posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 12:16 PM
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I know what you're saying is true. But do I really know?



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 12:25 PM
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Well actually, we don't really know until we' ve experienced ourselves. And our main goal, here on earth as human beings, is to learn actually learn from life experience and learn through others. The examples you gave show much more "gut feeling" than actual attestments of knowledge, they don't necessarily, claim they " know ", but through gut feeling mixed with either lack of trust ( he's cheating on me ), lack of common sense ( they're gonna win tonite...). A

And that is basically human nature, we love to claim to " know " because we come to fear what we don't know. Not knowing is part of the beauty of it all because as I stated we are her on earth to learn as humans and if we knew everything there would'nt be nothing left to learn.

So learn fellow humans, learn and love along with " true knowledge
One blood one love , Peace!



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by NoLoveInFear46and2
 



I can agree with you...to a point. What I was saying was we should learn to accept that despite our fears, dreads and hopes, we do not know everything we ASSUME we know. And that's what it comes down to: the exchange between assumption and knowledge.

When we learn to define that very thin line (as it has become) between assumption and true knowledge, as well as a few of the more important gradients in between (suspicion, reasonable doubt, theoretically conclusive, solidly proven, etc.) we might very well be able to communicate and observe much more effectively.

Until then, our single-faceted perspectives, with all of our assumptions, continue to handicap us.



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 12:38 PM
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I just knew your rant would end that way, I Just Knew It.



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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Also, I was wondering if, now that my raging torrent has subsided, the mods would be able to move this to a psychology section? I would rather this thread be productive instead of being seen as a sludge-dump in the bowels of ATS...



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 12:40 PM
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reply to post by DAZ21
 


Accept it as a personal truth, rather than universal. That way, your views don't hinder the collective learning experience.



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 


All too often, perception defines reality for the individual. They then make their opinions based upon what they read or see, based upon their world view, which is often limited by what they read or see.

It’s a vicious circle.

When my boss tells me to do something, I give him a brief synopsis of what he told me in return, just to make sure that I have understood him correctly. That way I avoid the old, “I told you to do X” and my reply is, “But I thought you wanted it done this way.”

In military parlance it’s called a “Briefback.”

It’s all about understanding. And being able to honestly question yourself.



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 02:05 PM
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Also I would like to add that we can know something but that there is always a deeper knowing of a particular subject.

If we knew nothing like you presume in your initial post, the human civilization as we know it, would be in turmoil.

The fact that we have progressed as a species is witness to our developing knowledge. So we can learn and know and there will always be more to learn, progress, and ultimately know.

Then again if you are refering to knowing, spoken in context of a different perspective, not that of actual knowledge. Then I suppose the culprit won't have a knowing, just a suspicion.



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 02:42 PM
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Originally posted by Starchild23
reply to post by NoLoveInFear46and2
 



I can agree with you...to a point. What I was saying was we should learn to accept that despite our fears, dreads and hopes, we do not know everything we ASSUME we know. And that's what it comes down to: the exchange between assumption and knowledge.

When we learn to define that very thin line (as it has become) between assumption and true knowledge, as well as a few of the more important gradients in between (suspicion, reasonable doubt, theoretically conclusive, solidly proven, etc.) we might very well be able to communicate and observe much more effectively.

Until then, our single-faceted perspectives, with all of our assumptions, continue to handicap us.


I agree with much of what you say, and I have been that person who has listened to my brain fool me more than once..

BUT..I have also been the person who kept getting a gut feeling and ignored it.. because it was only a "feeling".. and when the definite proof is there that my gut feeling was "right" all along.. then I get frustrated at myself for not trusting in what my intuition was telling me.

It leads to doing some sort of dance between trusting what you think your intuition is telling you, and not relying on your own judgement which can be definitely flawed at times.

I know what you are talking about.. because I have been wrong about things that I thought I was right about.. and have seen others be wrong as well..especially when it is concerning yourself.. because you know what the truth is..and they don't.

In the end truth is truth, not a perception.. though it can have more than one angle to look at it from.

I will start using "I believe" more than I know, because you prove a very valid point about knowing... and beliefs can be changed if information that is worthy and reliable is presented.




edit on 29-1-2012 by gabby2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 02:48 PM
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Originally posted by DAZ21
Also I would like to add that we can know something but that there is always a deeper knowing of a particular subject.

If we knew nothing like you presume in your initial post, the human civilization as we know it, would be in turmoil.

The fact that we have progressed as a species is witness to our developing knowledge. So we can learn and know and there will always be more to learn, progress, and ultimately know.

Then again if you are refering to knowing, spoken in context of a different perspective, not that of actual knowledge. Then I suppose the culprit won't have a knowing, just a suspicion.


That's exactly what I'm saying. We, the planetary master of grasping and groping, have extended our knowledge to encompass suspicions as well. We "know" concepts that are just working theories.

If we accept that half the stuff we think we know, we really DON'T know, then a lot of people will suddenly realize that maybe everyone else isn't wrong after all. Maybe we'll actually get along after that.

Acknowledgement of ignorance aids acceptance of difference.

Aaaannnnnddd that's jenga!
(to quote my favorite alien, Paul)



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