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The Coca Cola Conspiracy: The secret cause for the U.S. obesity epidemic

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posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:14 PM
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Just watched the documentary which was very informative




posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:17 PM
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another Khazar/ illuminati agenda being fulfilled. the only physically fit Americans are those serving in the armed forces. makes population control easier if we are all depressed fat people who have heart attacks leaving our wealth to the state since our fat kids will suffer the same fate as us, or join the NWO army and eventually cause WW3.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:17 PM
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What is the advantage for obesity? It's got energy storage for a rainy day because it lets you deal with famine.




The Obesity Tsunami as Dr. Lustig calls it.




If you give a five year old a cookie what happens? They jump off walls....it tells the brain to stimulate the sympathetic nervous system....What if you give an obese five year old kid a cookie? They are in the pantry looking for more cookies. That's called leptin resistance.




ABSTRACT: Rates of fructose consumption continue to rise worldwide, and have been linked to rising rates of obesity, type-2 diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome. Elucidation of fructose metabolism in liver and fructose action in brain demonstrate three parallelisms with ethanol. First, hepatic fructose metabolism is similar to ethanol in that by accelerating the process of de novo lipogenesis, both promote hepatic insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. Second, fructosylation of proteins with resultant superoxide formation can result in inflammation similar to acetaldehyde, an intermediary metabolite of ethanol. Lastly, by stimulating the "hedonic pathway" of the brain both directly and indirectly, fructose creates habituation, and possibly dependence; also paralleling ethanol. On a societal level, the treatment of fructose as a commodity on the open market exhibits similarities to ethanol. Fructose induces alterations in both hepatic metabolism and central nervous system energy signaling, leading to a "vicious cycle" of excessive consumption and disease consistent with metabolic syndrome. These dose-dependent actions of fructose on the liver and on the hedonic pathway of the brain recapitulate the effects of ethanol.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:21 PM
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You know who else has Cola and ads for cola? Other countries. Did nobody ever tell you to not drink so much soda, because its bad for you?
edit on 30-1-2012 by Cassius666 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by Cassius666
You know who else has Cola and ads for cola? Other countries. Did nobody ever tell you to not drink so much soda, because its bad for you?
edit on 30-1-2012 by Cassius666 because: (no reason given)


Yeah, they did. But mostly people are told that it's bad because it's empty calories, or it's bad because it has sugar. And most people think, well, what will a few drinks a day really hurt? I like it.

Information is not out there widely enough yet.

The body is amazing at dealing with toxins. We'd be goners otherwise. Our bodies are big filters for everything we ingest or breathe or rub all over our skin. They do a good job for a long time until they reach the tipping point. After that, things start gong wrong and breaking down.

We can't do a perfect job of keeping ourselves protected from all the toxins around us. It would probably be dumb to try. But we can make a huge difference by figuring out the worst and cutting back on those obvious ones we don't need.

But it is a choice, always.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:43 PM
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Originally posted by JustSlowlyBackAway

Originally posted by Cassius666
You know who else has Cola and ads for cola? Other countries. Did nobody ever tell you to not drink so much soda, because its bad for you?
edit on 30-1-2012 by Cassius666 because: (no reason given)


Yeah, they did. But mostly people are told that it's bad because it's empty calories, or it's bad because it has sugar. And most people think, well, what will a few drinks a day really hurt? I like it.

Information is not out there widely enough yet.

The body is amazing at dealing with toxins. We'd be goners otherwise. Our bodies are big filters for everything we ingest or breathe or rub all over our skin. They do a good job for a long time until they reach the tipping point. After that, things start gong wrong and breaking down.

We can't do a perfect job of keeping ourselves protected from all the toxins around us. It would probably be dumb to try. But we can make a huge difference by figuring out the worst and cutting back on those obvious ones we don't need.

But it is a choice, always.



Leptin deficiency and/or Leptin resistance causes the brain to not signal the body to stop eating.

So the environment needs to be changed -- do we market addictive toxins aggressively with captive audiences?

Yes with HFCS we do. It's wrong. It's not an individual choice. It's a structural issue.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


I see you can't stop pushing BS. Do you know what a real addiction is like? Have you ever been addicted to anything? Hfcs is not addictive.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


I see you can't stop pushing BS. Do you know what a real addiction is like? Have you ever been addicted to anything? Hfcs is not addictive.


Fatty Foods Addictive as Cocaine in Growing Body of Science



A growing body of medical research at leading universities and government laboratories suggests that processed foods and sugary drinks made by the likes of PepsiCo Inc. and Kraft Foods Inc. (KFT) aren’t simply unhealthy. They can hijack the brain in ways that resemble addictions to coc aine, nicotine and other drugs. “The data is so overwhelming the field has to accept it,” said Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “We are finding tremendous overlap between drugs in the brain and food in the brain.”



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


I understand what the article is saying. I think it is perhaps a bit misrepresented, however.
A lack of junk-food will not produce the same effects as a withdrawal from narcotics. Ever.
We all know soda is bad for us. It's not a conspiracy though.
It's capitalism.

ETA: I think the real problem is that we do know all this junk is bad for us. We just don't care.

edit on 1/30/2012 by sindeestarr because: more thoughts




posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 

Yeah you have posted something like that before if not the same thing. Unless you have actually had a coc aine addiction you wouldn't know if it is true. After having smoked for probably 15 years one day I decided to stop. I quit cold turkey. Didn't have any symptoms or ill effects and that is a truely addictive substance.

Hfcs I don't think its that hard to say no to. The Japanese and S. Koreans don't seem to have a problem with it. I actually had an imported Cherry coke (hfcs) about a month ago. I didn't feel the need for another one so I have to keep saying that it is BS.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by sindeestarr
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


I understand what the article is saying. I think it is perhaps a bit misrepresented, however.
A lack of junk-food will not produce the same effects as a withdrawal from narcotics. Ever.
We all know soda is bad for us. It's not a conspiracy though.
It's capitalism.

ETA: I think the real problem is that we do know all this junk is bad for us. We just don't care.

edit on 1/30/2012 by sindeestarr because: more thoughts



New Research Links High Fructose Corn Syrup to Diabetes in Children




Researchers examined the chemical composition of 11 different beverages containing high fructose corn syrup. All of them were found to contain "astonishingly high" levels of reactive carbonyls, according to lead researcher Chi-Tang Ho. Reactive carbonyls, associated with the "unbound" fructose and glucose molecules found in high fructose corn syrup, are a type of free radical that has been associated with diabetes. Levels of reactive carbonyls are unusually high in the blood of those with the disease, and are also linked with the occurrence of complications. Reactive carbonyls are also believed to cause tissue damage that may contribute to the development of the disease, especially in children. In contrast, reactive carbonyls are not present in table sugar or other sweeteners composed mostly of "bound," chemically stable sugars.


Soda Warning? High-Fructose Corn Syrup Linked To Diabetes, New Study Suggests



In the current study, Chi-Tang Ho, Ph.D., conducted chemical tests among 11 different carbonated soft drinks containing HFCS. He found 'astonishingly high' levels of reactive carbonyls in those beverages. These undesirable and highly-reactive compounds associated with "unbound" fructose and glucose molecules are believed to cause tissue damage, says Ho, a professor of food science at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J. By contrast, reactive carbonyls are not present in table sugar, whose fructose and glucose components are "bound" and chemically stable, the researcher notes. Reactive carbonyls also are elevated in the blood of individuals with diabetes and linked to the complications of that disease. Based on the study data, Ho estimates that a single can of soda contains about five times the concentration of reactive carbonyls than the concentration found in the blood of an adult person with diabetes. Ho and his associates also found that adding tea components to drinks containing HFCS may help lower the levels of reactive carbonyls. The scientists found that adding epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a compound in tea, significantly reduced the levels of reactive carbonyl species in a dose-dependent manner when added to the carbonated soft drinks studied. In some cases, the levels of reactive carbonyls were reduced by half, the researchers say.

edit on 30-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: 2nd quote



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 10:41 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 

. I actually had an imported Cherry coke (hfcs) about a month ago. I didn't feel the need for another one so I have to keep saying that it is BS.


A single can of soda, however, has five times that concentration of reactive carbonyls.



HFCS on the other hand has unbound glucose and fructose molecules. While I’m not exactly sure of the mechanism, these unbound sugars hit the bloodstream as reactive compounds known as carbonyls. Reactive carbonyls, which have been linked to tissue damage and complications of diabetes, are elevated in the blood of people with diabetes. A single can of soda, however, has five times that concentration of reactive carbonyls. Old-fashioned table sugar, on the other hand, has no reactive carbonyls because its fructose and glucose molecules are “bound” and therefore stable, unlike the “unbound” molecules of HFCS. Sounds like lots of tissue damage from just a single soda.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by sindeestarr
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


I understand what the article is saying. I think it is perhaps a bit misrepresented, however.
A lack of junk-food will not produce the same effects as a withdrawal from narcotics. Ever.
We all know soda is bad for us. It's not a conspiracy though.
It's capitalism.

ETA: I think the real problem is that we do know all this junk is bad for us. We just don't care.

edit on 1/30/2012 by sindeestarr because: more thoughts



Withdrawal symptoms from sugar similar to drug withdrawal



Withdrawal from sugar, alcohol, and even caffeine can be just as severe as withdrawal from heroin or any other recreational drug. The many symptoms associated with drug withdrawal are remarkably similar to those associated with a hypoglycemic reaction. When one is deprived of their artificial source of energy, and glucose is not being adequately supplied to the brain (withdrawal symptoms), then one feels as panicky as one who is trapped under water and cannot breathe. Glucose deprivation, if severe, can result in death, and the hypoglycemia individual goes into a panic when the deprivation becomes severe.




edit on 30-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: (no reason given)


Sugar Addiction



Similar to recreational drug use, sugar has been shown to increase brain concentrations of dopamine and opiates which have a significant influence on mood. In addition, when sugar is consistently consumed in excess, it has been shown to delay the release of acetylcholine which can prolong appetite and encourage binge eating. Frequent sugar consumption has also been shown to reduce sensitivity to dopamine and opiates and produce withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety and depression, all of which is consistent with the characteristics of drug addiction.42,43,44,128,129,130 In fact, one study has shown sugar to be even more addictive than coc aine.45

edit on 30-1-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 11:01 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 

Yeah you have posted something like that before if not the same thing. Unless you have actually had a coc aine addiction you wouldn't know if it is true. After having smoked for probably 15 years one day I decided to stop. I quit cold turkey. Didn't have any symptoms or ill effects and that is a truely addictive substance.

Hfcs I don't think its that hard to say no to. The Japanese and S. Koreans don't seem to have a problem with it. I actually had an imported Cherry coke (hfcs) about a month ago. I didn't feel the need for another one so I have to keep saying that it is BS.


42. Avena NM, Rada P, Hoebel BG. "Evidence for sugar addiction: Behavioral and neurochemical effects of intermittent, excessive sugar intake." Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews. 2008. 32(1):20-39.
43. Colantuoni C, Rada P, McCarthy J, Patten C, Avena NM, Chadeayne A, Hoebel BG. "Evidence That Intermittent, Excessive Sugar Intake Causes Endogenous Opioid Dependence." Obesity Research. 2002. 10:478-488.
44. Avena NM, Long KA, Hoebel BG. "Sugar-dependent rats show enhanced responding for sugar after absitnence: Evidence of a sugar deprivation effect." Physiology & Behavior. 2005. 84(3):359-362.
45. Lenoir M, Serre F, Cantin L, Ahmed SH. "Intense Sweetness Surpasses Cocaine Reward." PLoS ONE 2007. 2(8):e698.

Sugar Addiction



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


We were talking addictive properties not what it is doing to the body.


HFCS on the other hand has unbound glucose and fructose molecules.

So does honey and I have never met anyone jonesing for a hit of honey.


Withdrawal from sugar, alcohol, and even caffeine can be just as severe as withdrawal from heroin or any other recreational drug.

Again if you have never experienced it yourself first hand you have no idea if this is true. I'm a coffee drinker and I have not had a drop of coffee or anything else with caffine in the last 2 days. I don't feel my body craving it. I do know that people like their repetative habits. People are strange in that way but it isn't the substance as much as thier own personal addictive personalities.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 11:06 PM
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Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


We were talking addictive properties not what it is doing to the body.

Again if you have never experienced it yourself first hand you have no idea if this is true.




Plenty of first hand testimony here



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


Still doesn't explain why certain populations have it on their shelves but are not effected in the same way. Real world examples trump lab resluts. You have to apply occam's razor even to scientific literature.
edit on 30-1-2012 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


Already explained in the post you replied to. People can become addicted to anything. Even things that don't enter the body. It's the person not the object of that persons desire that is the problem.

And you posting this makes it second hand. First hand would be your own personal exoerience but I guess you have none.
edit on 30-1-2012 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 11:11 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


Addiction and withdrawal is hard to understand if you've never experienced it. You can list all the withdrawal symptoms that you want, but you'll never understand what it is truly like until you've been there. Not that I suggest doing that, not even in the name of science



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 11:30 PM
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Originally posted by sindeestarr
reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


Addiction and withdrawal is hard to understand if you've never experienced it. You can list all the withdrawal symptoms that you want, but you'll never understand what it is truly like until you've been there. Not that I suggest doing that, not even in the name of science




Plenty of first hand experience - more here.



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