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Believing the impossible and conspiracy theories

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posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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Believing the impossible and conspiracy theories


www.physorg.com

Distrust and paranoia about government has a long history, and the feeling that there is a conspiracy of elites can lead to suspicion for authorities and the claims they make. For some, the attraction of conspiracy theories is so strong that it leads them to endorse entirely contradictory beliefs, according to a study in the current Social Psychological and Personality Science.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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... AND ... they're back!

You have to wonder about the audience for this article. Are they that oblivious to the writing style that invokes the notion of impossibility with the topic of conspiracies?


People who endorse conspiracy theories see authorities as fundamentally deceptive. The conviction that the "official story" is untrue can lead people to believe several alternative theories-despite contradictions among them. "Any conspiracy theory that stands in opposition to the official narrative will gain some degree of endorsement from someone who holds a conpiracist worldview," according to Michael Wood, Karen Douglas and Robbie Sutton of the University of Kent.


The brightest minds of Kent chose to ask 147 students about the death of Princess Dianna.... no emotional complications to that issue there.... of course - finding the irrationality surrounding the perceptions about that fiasco gave them ample cause to proclaim the problems with conspiracy theories (and theorists) in general...

Not sure I need to elaborate much more about this... I'm sure you've heard it all before....



www.physorg.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 26-1-2012 by Maxmars because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 05:10 PM
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There would be no conspiracies if people in power did not do questionably immoral, dangerous and frankly outragous things.

When people look into how such things happen, they find more questions and no the answers that should be right there.

Thats why theres such distrust and therefore conspiracy theorys in politics and war.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 05:12 PM
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To be fair they're right on the whole "distrust and paranoia about government has a long history." For example, before the 1789 French Revolution many of the third estate toilers believed that the nobles and traders were playing with food prices so that it was expensive for them but really cheap for the elite. This wasn't the case.

Apart from that it kinda spurts out boring propaganda. The whole, many believe this and others believe this isn't a good argument at all.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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I like to call it the "Jigsaw Puzzle effect." The result of any given event can be seen as a jigsaw puzzle, which people scramble to put together, hoping to make sense of it, to find the truth. Unfortunately, pieces go missing, or pieces don't fit, so people have a tendency to force pieces where they don't belong, or use pieces from another jigsaw puzzle all together.

This happens because, when it comes to major events usually concerning the government, religion, or the military, many facets of the truth are kept purposely hidden from the public.

For instance, was the Roswell Incident a UFO crashing in the desert? Probably not. But the fact that the government gives bogus explanations makes them seem suspicious, and thus people have to fill in the blanks the best they can to make an answer.

Thus, we have theories, rather than facts.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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The authors come from the psychology branch of The University of Kent. One of the authors is Mrs Karen Douglas. According to her profile is her:


...primary research focus is on beliefs in conspiracy theories. Why are conspiracy theories so popular? Who believes them? Why do people believe them? What are some of the consequences of conspiracy theories and can such theories be harmful?

www.kent.ac.uk...

Psychologists study all kind of social interactions. So it is normal that there are also some psychologists who are interested in conspiracy theories from an outsiders point of view. As long as they only publish their research in professional journals, I find that hardly conspicuous. But when they become celebrities overnight, are invited by the media and start to evaluate the truth behind all kinds of possible conspiracy theories, it begins to smell fishy. David Aaronovitch is one of those fishy guys. As far as I know, Mrs Douglas seems not to belong to the smelling category.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 06:23 PM
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Well, well, well, what have we here.

At least they got one part right. It was impossible to believe.

The USA I was born into was not a country that made conspiracy based laws.

But that changed in the 70's.


RICO is the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. This act makes it illegal to participate in an organization that is involved in criminal activity. Conspiracy is a secret agreement to commit an illegal act.

. . .

RICO laws were [color=gold] enacted by Congress in 1970. They originally were developed to prosecute the Mafia and others committing organized crime. Over time, however, its application has become much more widespread.

Milwaukee RICO Conspiracy Lawyer



And then later we get this gem...




18 U.S.C. § 371 : US Code - Section 371: Conspiracy to commit offense or to defraud United States

If two or more persons conspire either to commit any offense
against the United States, or to defraud the United States, or any
agency thereof in any manner or for any purpose, and one or more of
such persons do any act to effect the object of the conspiracy,
each shall be fined under this title or imprisoned

codes/findlaw.com


I guess the law is truely only for our owners now, and not us.
I mean acording to the article "I must be crazy" to believe
that conspiracy is real in the US. Even though it's listed in the Law books.


David Grouchy



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 06:29 PM
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This study reminds me of another study, which directly targeted ATS-members.

It was during the swine flu hype, that McGill University tried to recruit participants for a H1N1 coping study. Someone opened an account on ATS for recruiting posts. The study was sponsored by the WHO and the name Douglas also involved. But this time it wasn't a female psychologist with forename Karen, it was the Douglas mental health institute. In the past the Douglas mental health institute was headed by Dr Ewen Cameron. Cameron was a leading MK Ultra researcher and head of the World Psychiatric Association. For his research and work for the CIA he tortured and traumatized hundreds of patients. Somehow the McGill University fails to mention these gruesome aspects of Camerons work on their website.

I took part in this study, but the results seem not to be published anywhere as open source..

Here is the thread about this strange recruitment
Mental health institute, formerly headed by MK Ultra researcher, recruits ATS members for H1N1 study
edit on 26-1-2012 by Drunkenshrew because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-1-2012 by Drunkenshrew because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 06:31 PM
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I think that article is part of some huge conspiracy. These conspirators are conspiring to state the obvious. Only great minds can entertain contradictory theories and realize that they do not have to support eachother to be more plausible than the official story.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 06:34 PM
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Keep taking the soma and go to sleep little sheepy go to sleep
Parrot the truth we tell you and you will be fine

When you experience corruption and tyranny which grows expedentially the higher you go then you know such things exist.
edit on 26-1-2012 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 06:38 PM
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Originally posted by davidgrouchy

I guess the law is truely only for our owners now, and not us.
I mean acording to the article "I must be crazy" to believe
that conspiracy is real in the US. Even though it's listed in the Law books.


David Grouchy


It's only us, the peasants, that conspire to defraud the government and other people. Governmental conspiracies do not exist, at least not in the US, because our leaders never have ulterior motives and our government operates out in the open for all to see.[/sarcasm] There are no secrets beyond national security, EVERYTHING is a matter of national security.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 07:01 PM
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The term conspiracy theory was not always used in a negative way. The term has become a tool to dismiss conflicting evidence of state crimes against democracy out of hand.


Originally a neutral term, during the political upheaval[not in citation given] of the 1960s it also acquired a somewhat derogatory sense, implying paranoia.[4] The term is sometimes used to automatically dismiss claims that are deemed ridiculous, misconceived, paranoid, unfounded, outlandish or irrational. A proven conspiracy theory, such as the notion that Nixon and his aides were behind the Watergate break-in and cover-up, is usually referred to as something else, such as investigative journalism or historical analysis

en.wikipedia.org...

I believe this happened not by accident, it was planned by TPTB. The CIA for example sent in 1967 a memo to its media assets. The memo instructed the presstitutes how they should counter evidence and stories which conflicted with the official story. So even back then, they had someone like Cass Sunstein who wanted to implement a “vigorous countermisinformation establishment [a Sunstein term]”.




CIA Instructions to Media Assets

This document caused quite a stir when it was discovered in 1977. Dated 4/1/67, and marked "DESTROY WHEN NO LONGER NEEDED", this document is a stunning testimony to how concerned the CIA was over investigations into the Kennedy assassination. Emphasis has been added to facilitate scanning.

1. Our Concern. From the day of President Kennedy's assassination on, there has been speculation about the responsibility for his murder...

2. This trend of opinion is a matter of concern to the U.S. government, including our organisation...

...Conspiracy theories have frequently thrown suspicion on our organisation, for example by falsely alleging that Lee Harvey Oswald worked for us. The aim of this dispatch is to provide material countering and discrediting the claims of the conspiracy theorists, so as to inhibit the circulation of such claims in other countries. Background information is supplied in a classified section and in a number of unclassified attachments.

mtracy9.tripod.com...

Complementary to the presstitutes, the CIA had also thousands of assets, who were employed by academia.



posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 11:28 AM
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Here is a lecture of Karen Douglas on conspiracy theories from the 2011 CFI UK Conspiracy Theories Conference


Much of what Mrs Douglas says makes sense to me.

The only really part which surprised me, was her finding that people who endorse conspiracy theories are also more likely, to be willing, to conspire themselves. I personally am appalled by using Machiavellian tactics in any form. But she herself remarks, that this finding probably comes from the fact, that her study group consisted of psychology students, not persons like for example JFK-researchers, who spend much of their time trying to uncover the truth behind past crimes.

As a complement to Mrs Douglas I recommend the lecture from the behavioural neuroscientist Laurie Manwell. Manwell is part of the 9/11 truth movement and examines the psychology from the other side. Why do people refuse to look at conspiracies?

The Psychological Implications of 9/11 by Laurie Manwell (1 Part - rest on youtube)




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