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Why does gravity always create a sphere?

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posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by MaChOMaNuGGeT
 


Couldn't have said it better, you beat me to it.....but to add further explaination, a circle is the most effcient shape in nature....and as you point out....all forces are shaping from all directions....keep in mind gravity is not the only force that does this. Nor is gravity the only force influencing the shape of a object with mass when it forms......lest we forget magnatism which is the primary force that accentuates gravity as a force in general.




posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 09:16 AM
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reply to post by definity
 


Just to note, those exaggerated gravity dents and bulges represent deviations of a tiny fraction of a percent from expected surface gravity values.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 09:19 AM
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reply to post by mandroids
 





Could this be key in understanding and then manipulating gravity?


No. Why does a snowball, when rolled down a snowy slope, enlarge into a bigger "ball", because that's how the matter clumps together. Cubes rarely exist in nature, spheroid shapes, on the other hand, are everywhere as it's the most compact possible shape while keeping the highest possible volume.

So lets explain how something like a typical solid planet forms. You've got a massive cloud of rotating gas and matter. Because some of this stuff has mass, it has a gravitational effect, pulling things in closer, which because of the spinning motion and gravitational attraction, become, over time, part of the object. Because gravity it working out in all directions from the center of mass, the pull is equal in all directions, making it a spheroid shape, rarely a perfect sphere, but spheroid none the less.

The more matter it brings in towards the center of gravity, the more mass is present, the larger the gravitational effect becomes.

The key to understand and possibly manipulating gravity comes in discerning the mechanical process that actually allows gravity to work.

One of the better theories is that there is a field, or fields, permeating all of space called the "higgs field" this field acts against particles like water would against a boat or object travelling through it. This resistance offered against particles by the higgs field creates the ILLUSION of mass, when in fact, it's merely a factor of resistance.

The LHC is actively trying to break off a piece of this higgs field, and to find the higgs boson, the particle that would be considered the "force carrying" particle of that particular field.

If we can tap into THAT knowledge, there is a chance we could manipulate the higgs field, and manipulate gravity by extension.

That said, this was a waste of my time as the OP is clearly not reading or comprehending any replies.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 09:21 AM
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reply to post by mandroids
 


I won't get into quantum physics until you can understand how gravity works. Slow your roll!



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 09:24 AM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwaters
reply to post by mandroids
 





Could this be key in understanding and then manipulating gravity?


No. Why does a snowball, when rolled down a snowy slope, enlarge into a bigger "ball", because that's how the matter clumps together. Cubes rarely exist in nature, spheroid shapes, on the other hand, are everywhere as it's the most compact possible shape while keeping the highest possible volume.

So lets explain how something like a typical solid planet forms. You've got a massive cloud of rotating gas and matter. Because some of this stuff has mass, it has a gravitational effect, pulling things in closer, which because of the spinning motion and gravitational attraction, become, over time, part of the object. Because gravity it working out in all directions from the center of mass, the pull is equal in all directions, making it a spheroid shape, rarely a perfect sphere, but spheroid none the less.

The more matter it brings in towards the center of gravity, the more mass is present, the larger the gravitational effect becomes.

The key to understand and possibly manipulating gravity comes in discerning the mechanical process that actually allows gravity to work.

One of the better theories is that there is a field, or fields, permeating all of space called the "higgs field" this field acts against particles like water would against a boat or object travelling through it. This resistance offered against particles by the higgs field creates the ILLUSION of mass, when in fact, it's merely a factor of resistance.

The LHC is actively trying to break off a piece of this higgs field, and to find the higgs boson, the particle that would be considered the "force carrying" particle of that particular field.

If we can tap into THAT knowledge, there is a chance we could manipulate the higgs field, and manipulate gravity by extension.

That said, this was a waste of my time as the OP is clearly not reading or comprehending any replies.




Not a waste and I appreciate the effort and replies.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 09:25 AM
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Originally posted by r3axion
reply to post by mandroids
 


I won't get into quantum physics until you can understand how gravity works. Slow your roll!



Like 4. I love your valley speak. [dude?].



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by mandroids
 


lol hey I only said like cause I didn't actually count how many times



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 09:37 AM
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I think the answer is...because those spherical objects are spinning.

Think of it like play-doh on a table. If you just apply pressure it will flatten out, but if you roll the play-doh as you apply pressure then it becomes a sphere.

A bubble is a sphere because the air inside the bubble was spinning when the bubble was formed...

Same with planets. Planets are spinning and when dust,asteroids, whatever hits it, then it becomes a sphere. Where-as a planet would be more misshapen if it weren't spinning.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 09:52 AM
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Originally posted by Bleeeeep
I think the answer is...because those spherical objects are spinning.



Here is a video that explains more about spinning....

Can't embed the video so here is the link....

Spinning
edit on 26-1-2012 by awakenone because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 10:29 AM
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reply to post by mandroids
 


I personally think that gravity is the effect of electrical forces between atomic and sub-atomic particles (matter, mass, . . . however you wish to define it). I do not think that it has anything to do with gravity leaking from another dimension into ours or it having anything to do with dark matter. A good example of this force at work is demonstrated by the force of gravity related to scale . . . the larger the mass (a larger amount of particles in one place) . . . the greater the pull on objects on its surface.

Now in the case of a spacecraft or astronaut that puts some distance between itself and another mass the effects of this connection is diminished depending on the mass of each object. It would be similar in my opinion to Tesla's wireless energy transfer in that the further away the generator is from a connection . . .the power degrades; but in this case each mass is a generator/attractor in its own right. A person would have little attraction the further away from Earth they get, and this would happen in a shorter distance, compared to the attraction between two bodies such as the Sun and Earth who's loss of attraction would be at a much greater distance.

Anyhow, that is my opinion on what creates gravity. Now on the question you asked about the spherical clumping of matter. When particles first attract to each other, at some point, this attraction is between few particles, thus; the attracting forces are so small that the connection between other, farther, masses is diminished to near null. With little to no "pulling" effect on this clump of matter, the only pull experienced is going to be from the nearby adjoining particles (kind of like static pulling dust to an object, only in the absence of any other "pulling" forces like the Earth, air, what-have-you) . . . so this attraction is virtually equal from all directions (creating a sphere).

But given enough mass (particles/matter=greater distance of attraction) in one place like the Earth and Moon, Sun and Earth, Sun and galactic core (black hole), then each will exert a force that will actually attempt to pull that matter toward each other . . . for example the not so round shape of the Sun, Earth, Moon, other stars, Etc, that we see as a result of this attraction.

That is my two-cents . . .



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 11:25 AM
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Anyone tell me why the astroid belt has not apeared to form a sphere?
The theory doesnt work with it.
All the planets were created by this force but the asteroid belt exists and defies gravity does it not?
Whats up wit dat?



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by stirling
 


The asteroid belt failed to coalesce because of the gravitational influence of Jupiter.
Also, in addition to that:

Asteroid belt mystery solved



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 11:40 AM
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The asteroids in the asteroid belt are too far away from each other to clump together and form planets.



posted on Jan, 26 2012 @ 11:50 AM
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Reply to post by stirling
 


The asteroid belt may not be spherical itself, but the individual objects that make up the belt are, though not perfectly spherical. The same goes with galaxies, either spiral or disk shaped the individual objects within them are spherical.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


Given that gravity causes the spherical form can you help me understand why planetary rings form a disc perpindicular to the g-force rather than a band equidistant from center of planet.

BTW, great signature.



posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


It depends on the orbital velocity of the objects that form the ring(s). When debris is captured, it will enter a higher orbit the slower it's moving. And, of course, the ring is formed because such debris will tend toward the equator due to centripetal force. This leads to a relatively flat ring extending out along the equatorial plane.
A single, thin, O-like ring would form if the captured debris all orbited at the same velocity.



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