It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

EU data protection law proposals include large fines

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 25 2012 @ 08:40 AM
link   

EU data protection law proposals include large fines


www.bbc.co.uk

The European Commission has put forward the suggestion as part of a new directive and regulation.

The new rules include users' "right to be forgotten" and an obligation on organisations to report data breaches "as soon as possible".

The boss of one tech-focused organisation described the proposals as a "tax" on firms holding customer data.

The Justice Commissioner, Viviane Reding, said it was important for EU citizens - particularly teenagers - to be in control of their online identities.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 25 2012 @ 08:40 AM
link   
the article goes on to say :


"My proposals will help build trust in online services because people will be better informed about their rights and more in control of their information," she said.

The commission says that key changes to the 1995 data protection rules include:

-People will have easier access to their own data, and will find it easier to transfer it from one service provider to another.

-Users will have the right to demand that data about them be deleted if there are no "legitimate grounds" for it to be kept.

-Organisations must notify the authorities about data breaches as early as possible, "if feasible within 24 hours".

-In cases where consent is required organisations must explicitly ask for permission to process data, rather than assume it.

-Companies with 250 or more employees will have to appoint a data protection officer.

The rules would apply to data handled outside the EU if the companies involved offered services to citizens living in the 27-nation zone.

The commissioner said that by simplifying the current "patchwork" of rules and cutting red tape, businesses could expect to save a total of 2.3bn euros ($3bn; £1.9bn) a year.

However, organisations which break the rules face penalties.

The commissioner suggested that companies that charged a user for a data request be fined up to 0.5% of their global turnover. She said that sum should double if a firm refused to hand over data or failed to correct bad information.


We have had so much bad news regarding the Internet just lately but for once this actually sounds like a good idea. It benefits the normal people like you and me , forces companies to think more about security and even creates a few jobs here and there.

So is this good news or is there a hidden pitfall or motive in there?

www.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 25-1-2012 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2012 @ 08:54 AM
link   
Sounds good.. However it's initiated by the government so where is the loopholes? And the government never does anything that does not benefit it self in some way, I can see these "fines" possibly becoming a revenue raiser on small to medium businesses.



posted on Jan, 25 2012 @ 09:45 AM
link   
the main question will be how much data must be kept just incase there is a legal need for it, such as person x asks for their posts on a forum to be removed along with their details etc and then someone using libel laws sueing over some post requiring its retention so could make it very hard to delete any actual data as the forum will want to cover itself from legal problems where they've deleted data required by a court case



new topics

top topics
 
1

log in

join