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Canada Gets Rid of Rwandan Genocide Suspect

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posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 12:27 PM
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Canada Gets Rid of Rwandan Genocide Suspect


www2.macleans.ca

Mugesera is charged in Rwanda with inciting murder, extermination and genocide. His deportation marks the end of his 16-year legal battle to remain in Canada.

In 2005, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that Mugesera committed a crime against humanity for encouraging the extermination of ethnic Tutsis in a 1992 speech in Rwanda. At the time, he was a member of the ruling Hutu party. An estimated 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus died as a result of the central African country’s 1994 genocide.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.bbc.co.uk
www.pretorianews.co.za
news.nationalpost.com




posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 12:27 PM
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As a born and raised Canadian citizen, I have to applaud the Canadian government for ridding our country of this kind of crap that infests us here.

Leon Mugesera, a mass, cold-blooded murderer, has lived in Canada for 16 years??? I am amazed that Canada allowed this to happen in the first place. It's no wonder people say that Canada is the safe-haven for terrorists and murderers. It's time like that I can say I feel disgusted to be Canadian, but at least now Canada is cleaning up its act!

What grinds my gears in this story is this:

Mugesera has raised fears of being tortured or killed if he is returned to Rwanda.


^If he had no fears committing genocide on his own people, he should not be surprised that he will pay the same penalty for his crime. I hope he does suffer (brutally), for his acts.

I have no sympathy for terrorists or people who commit crimes such as murder in my country. I believe that if you come into our country after you commit a crime elsewhere, you should be deported back to your country and pay your dues. It's not the burden for Canada to suffer as a result of your actions.

news.bbcimg.co.uk...

www2.macleans.ca
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 12:35 PM
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I wish no suffering on anyone but I am glad he is gone and I had no idea he was even living in Canada. I guess we are are very easy going here and that makes it alot easier for bad apples to smile their way in.



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 12:36 PM
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I applaud the Canadians for doing what is right here. If I actually find someone who can so much as JOKE about how Rwanda wasn't the slaughter it was..and how there is actually another way of seeing it, I'll scream. Sometimes, Evil is so clear and obvious, there isn't a debate needed..and we should be thankful when it's that easy to determine.

The only thing that sickens me is that 16 years passed before this monster was thrown out of a developed and downright luxurious Western nation (by standards where he committed his atrocities).

If this level of evil had happened outside of the African continent, it would have gone down in history with the hushed tones of infamy reserved for Hitler and Stalin with their mind boggling body counts...but gee..Just Africans slaughtered by the hundreds of thousands. Nothing to see.. Yikes... At least Canada FINALLY overcame their own system (ours is no better or worse, of course) and got him out.


Justice delayed is just late...it's still justice.



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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For the ATS members who wish to know how the genocide happened and its aftermath, read the following excerpt from the following article:

news.bbc.co.uk...
The genocide was sparked by the death of the Rwandan President Juvenal Habyarimana, a Hutu, when his plane was shot down above Kigali airport on 6 April 1994....

...Exactly who killed the president - and with him the president of Burundi and many chief members of staff - has not been established. Whoever was behind the killing its effect was both instantaneous and catastrophic.

In Kigali, the presidential guard immediately initiated a campaign of retribution. Leaders of the political opposition were murdered, and almost immediately, the slaughter of Tutsis and moderate Hutus began. Within hours, recruits were dispatched all over the country to carry out a wave of slaughter....

...Encouraged by the presidential guard and radio propaganda, an unofficial militia group called the Interahamwe (meaning those who attack together) was mobilised. At its peak, this group was 30,000-strong.

Soldiers and police officers encouraged ordinary citizens to take part. In some cases, Hutu civilians were forced to murder their Tutsi neighbours by military personnel. Participants were often given incentives, such as money or food, and some were even told they could appropriate the land of the Tutsis they killed...

www.gendercide.org...

...Within 24 hours of Habyarimana's jet being downed, roadblocks sprang up around Kigali, manned by the so-called interahamwe militia (the name means "those who attack together"). Tutsis were separated from Hutus and hacked to death with machetes at roadside (although many taller Hutus were presumed to be Tutsis and were also killed).

"Doing murder with a machete is exhausting, so the militias were organized to work in shifts. At the day's end, the Achilles tendons of unprocessed victims were sometimes cut before the murderers retired to rest, to feast on the victims' cattle and to drink. Victims who could afford to pay often chose to die from a bullet." (Wrage, "Genocide in Rwanda.")
Meanwhile, death-squads working from carefully-prepared lists went from neighbourhood to neighbourhood in Kigali. They murdered not only Tutsis but moderate Hutus, including the prime minister, Agathe Uwilingiyimana. The prime minister was guarded by a detachment of Belgian soldiers; these were arrested, disarmed, tortured, and murdered, prompting Belgium -- as intended -- to withdraw the remainder of its U.N. troops from Rwanda.

With breathtaking rapidity, the genocide expanded from Kigali to the countryside. Government radio encouraged Tutsis to congregate at churches, schools, and stadiums, pledging that these would serve as places of refuge. Thus concentrated, the helpless civilians could be more easily targeted -- although many miraculously managed to resist with only sticks and stones for days or even weeks, until the forces of the Rwandan army and presidential guard were brought in to exterminate them with machine-guns and grenades.

By April 21 -- that is, in just two weeks -- perhaps a quarter of a million Tutsis and moderate Hutus had been slaughtered. Together with the mass murder of Soviet prisoners-of-war during World War II, it was the most concentrated act of genocide in human history: "the dead of Rwanda accumulated at nearly three times the rate of Jewish dead during the Holocaust."


During the war of 1994, and particularly as a result of the genocidal massacres which precipitated it, it was principally the men of the targeted populations who lost their lives or fled to other countries in fear.

This targeting of men for slaughter was not confined to adults: boys were similarly decimated, raising the possibility that the demographic imbalance will continue for generations. Large numbers of women also lost their lives; however, mutilation and rape were the principal strategies used against women, and these did not necessarily result in death.


"testimonies from survivors confirm that rape was extremely widespread and that thousands of women were individually raped, gang-raped, raped with objects such as sharpened sticks or gun barrels, held in sexual slavery (either collectively or through forced "marriage") or sexually mutilated.

These crimes were frequently part of a pattern in which Tutsi women were raped after they had witnessed the torture and killings of their relatives and the destruction and looting of their homes. According to witnesses, many women were killed immediately after being raped. Other women managed to survive, only to be told that they were being allowed to live so that they would "die of sadness." Often women were subjected to sexual slavery and held collectively by a militia group or were singled out by one militia man, at checkpoints or other sites where people were being maimed or slaughtered, and held for personal sexual service..."
-------



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:09 PM
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Deporting is not always the best thing.

Watched a show on Discovery over the weekend and the US deported over 200 members of the "Eighteen Gang", from all over the US, back to Ed Salvador and they all got together down there and recruited double the size and all some how got back into U.S. It's a vicious circle sometimes.



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by CALGARIAN
 


But by allowing him to remain that sends the world a message that Canada will harbor genocidal criminals. The Tory gov't is cracking down on this stuff. One of the few things they are doing that I agree with. Lots of deportations going on. I still don't understand this one though.



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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How many died?
www.gendercide.org...

According to Gérard Prunier, "Because of the chaotic nature of the genocide, the total number of people killed has never been systematically assessed, but most experts believe the total was around 800,000 people.

This includes about 750,000 Tutsis and approximately 50,000 politically moderate Hutus who did not support the genocide. ... Only about 130,000 Tutsis survived the massacres." Some, though, have taken issue with Prunier's (and others') estimates, alleging that the number of Tutsis in Rwanda was lower at the outbreak of the genocide than is generally believed.

By these measures, "an estimated 500,000 Rwandan Tutsi were killed, or more than three-quarters of their population. ... The number of Hutu killed during the genocide and civil war is even less certain, with estimates ranging from 10,000 to well over 100,000." (Alan J. Kuperman, "Genocide in Rwanda and the Limits of Humanitarian Military Intervention," unpublished paper, 2000; see also Kuperman, "Rwanda in Retrospect," Foreign Affairs, January/February 2000.)

In February 2002, the Rwandan government released the results of the first major census that sought to establish the number of people killed in the genocide and during its prelude period (1990-94). It found that 1,074,017 people -- approximately one-seventh of the total population -- were murdered, with Tutsis accounting for 94 percent of the victims. ("More Than One Million Rwandans Killed in 1990's," Associated Press dispatch, February 14, 2002.)

The proportion of males among those killed can only be guessed at, but was probably in the vicinity of 75 or 80 percent.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Documentary on Genocide
www.youtube.com...

I found watching at 1:21 min very sad to hear one young man, aged 21, starved and desperate for survival with his family, talks about his fears and what was happening and what he was experiencing.


edit on 24-1-2012 by Skywatcher2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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I envy the Canadians right about now.Here in Britain he would of been given benefits and pampered beyond belief.



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by Viking9019
I envy the Canadians right about now.Here in Britain he would of been given benefits and pampered beyond belief.


He was given 16 years of benefits and pampering in Canada. I don't see your point? Aside from that, Canada is still under the rule of the British Monarchy, so technically it doesn't matter whether he resided in Britain or Canada, he would have been receiving the same treatment

edit on 24-1-2012 by Skywatcher2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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I can't wait to hear his sympathizers. You know he has some. IMO, he should be deported in his undies with a sign on his back and left in the middle of the street somewhere in his home country.

What do you think the sign on his back should say?



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by kimish
I can't wait to hear his sympathizers. You know he has some. IMO, he should be deported in his undies with a sign on his back and left in the middle of the street somewhere in his home country.

What do you think the sign on his back should say?


A good 'ol "Kick Me" sign is a start

edit on 24-1-2012 by Skywatcher2011 because: edit



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:32 PM
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How long before the victim card gets pulled out? It's almost inevitable.



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:42 PM
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I have a plan for the ones we can't deport. I think you'll like it.

It is even better because most of these people come from warm climates.

I think we pick a nice island in the Artic. Like Bryde Island.

maps.google.ca...,-100.745316&spn=0.059706,0.216637&t=h&z=12&vp6

Construct a nice outdoor prison for war criminals. Nice though, so that no one can complain too much about how inhumane it is.

There should be many wide spread stories about how terrible it is.

The occassional story about how unfortunate it is when a polar bear gets in and eats one of them. We feel real bad about it.


edit on 2012/1/24 by Aeons because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:47 PM
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reply to post by Aeons
 


Why not just depopulate the war criminals? Setting up a prison and harboring them there only costs tax payers money and does not do anything to compensate those families who have lost their loved ones in the genocide or other violent criminal acts. Just a thought



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:48 PM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 


No capital punishment, and even if there was the crimes were commited out of jurisdiction.



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by Aeons
 


I never said capital punishment. I said depopulate...see definition:


"To reduce sharply the population of, as by disease, war, or forcible relocation."

www.answers.com...



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 09:50 PM
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I know that in Montreal, ever since it was discovered that he was living around there, refugees suffered a double dose of anguish. I still remember an interview with a woman who suspected he was the same man she believed incited the genocide. Talk about having the cards stacked against any kind of smooth recovery from PTSD! I hope they will find some measure of peace now.

This business of endless appeals is a real embarrassment and is outright wrong. Enough is enough.



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